Michigan Alumnus Quarterly Review, Volume 53

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Alumni Association of the University of Michigan., 1946
Includes section: "Some Michigan books."

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Page 299 - The people that walked in darkness have seen a great light : they that dwell in the land of the shadow of death, upon them hath the light shined.
Page 2 - For, don't you mark ? we're made so that we love First when we see them painted, things we have passed Perhaps a hundred times nor cared to see; And so they are better, painted — better to us, Which is the same thing. Art was given for that; God uses us to help each other so, Lending our minds out.
Page 2 - For what? Do you feel thankful, ay or no, For this fair town's face, yonder river's line, The mountain round it and the sky above, Much more the figures of man, woman, child. These are the frame to?
Page 302 - Yet a little sleep, a little slumber, a little folding of the hands to sleep ; so shall thy poverty come as one that travelleth, and thy want as an armed man.
Page 272 - It is the common fate of the indolent to see their rights become a prey to the active. The condition upon which God hath given liberty to man is eternal vigilance \ which condition if he break, servitude is at once the consequence of his crime, and the punishment of his guilt.
Page 299 - And he shall judge among many people, and rebuke strong nations afar off; and they shall beat their swords into plowshares, and their spears into pruninghooks : nation shall not lift up a sword against nation, neither shall they learn war any more, But they shall sit every man under his vine and under his fig tree ; and none shall make them afraid: for the mouth of the LORD of hosts hath spoken it.
Page 302 - A merry heart doeth good like a medicine: but a broken spirit drieth the bones.
Page 50 - Of Heaven or Hell I have no power to sing, I cannot ease the burden of your fears, Or make quick-coming death a little thing, Or bring again the pleasure of past years, Nor for my words shall ye forget your tears, Or hope again for aught that I can say, The idle singer of an empty day.
Page 302 - And I turned myself to behold wisdom, and madness, and folly; for what can the man do that cometh after the king? even that which hath been already done. Then I saw that wisdom excelleth folly, as far as light excelleth darkness.
Page 364 - Here dead lie we because we did not choose To live and shame the land from which we sprung. Life, to be sure, is nothing much to lose; But young men think it is, and we were young.

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