Essays

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W. Scott, 1888 - 314 pages
 

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Page 74 - Saturn laugh'd and leap'd with him. Yet nor the lays of birds , nor the sweet smell Of different flowers in odour and in hue, Could make me any summer's story tell, Or from their proud lap pluck them where they grew : Nor...
Page 74 - Such seems your beauty still. Three winters cold Have from the forests shook three summers...
Page 69 - All sadness but despair: now gentle gales, Fanning their odoriferous wings, dispense Native perfumes, and whisper whence they stole Those balmy spoils. As when to them who sail Beyond the Cape of Hope, and now are past...
Page 298 - ... by indulging some peculiar habits of thought was eminently delighted with those flights of imagination which pass the bounds of nature, and to which the mind is reconciled only by a passive acquiescence in popular traditions. He loved fairies, genii, giants, and monsters; he delighted to rove through the meanders of enchantment, to gaze on the magnificence of golden palaces, to repose by the waterfalls of Elysian gardens.
Page 31 - Hath deckt their rising cheeks in red, Such as on your lips is spread. Here be berries for a queen, Some be red, some be green ; These are of that luscious meat The great god Pan himself doth eat : All these, and what the woods can yield, The hanging mountain, or the field, I freely offer, and ere long Will bring you more, more sweet and strong ; Till when, humbly leave I take, Lest the great Pan do awake, That sleeping lies in a deep glade, Under a broad beech's shade.
Page 163 - She said; then raging to Sir Plume repairs, And bids her beau demand the precious hairs: (Sir Plume of amber snuff-box justly vain, And the nice conduct of a clouded cane...
Page 6 - Receive them free, and sell them by the weight; Bags of fiery opals, sapphires, amethysts, Jacinths, hard topaz, grass-green emeralds, Beauteous rubies, sparkling diamonds, And seld-seen costly stones of so great price, As one of them indifferently rated, And of a carat of this quantity, May serve, in peril of calamity, To ransom great kings from captivity...
Page 74 - When daisies pied, and violets blue, And lady-smocks all silver white, And cuckoo-buds of yellow hue, Do paint the meadows with delight...
Page 144 - I therefore pray thee, Renny dear, That thou wilt give to me, With cream and sugar soften'd well, Another dish of tea. " Nor fear that I, my gentle maid, Shall long detain the cup, When once unto the bottom I Have drunk the liquor up. " Yet hear, alas ! this mournful truth, Nor hear it with a frown ; — Thou canst not make the tea so fast As I can gulp it down.
Page 152 - Care-charming Sleep, thou easer of all woes, Brother to Death, sweetly thyself dispose On this afflicted prince. Fall like a cloud In gentle showers: give nothing that is loud Or painful to his slumbers: easy, light, And as a purling stream, thou son of Night, Pass by his troubled senses: sing his pain Like hollow murmuring wind, or silver rain. Into this prince, gently, oh gently slide; And kiss him into slumbers, like a bride.

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