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quinine powders repeated. It is a grand tice? I was talking very recently with a thing to be able to practice medicine with- doctor nearly forty years in practice, and out prejudice against isms or remedies; and we agreed that there was no great change here I would mention “Comfort's Spiced for the better since the days of Meigs and Bitters," a good old Thompsonian com. Hodge. The asepsin or antisepsin treatpound, easy to administer and pleasant to ment of cases and care of instrument had take and always good in convalescence not been evident to our observation. He and debility with poor appetite, etc. had used the forceps scores of times,-in

While I am slow to admit that there has fact, I think he was maniacal in their use been much change for the better in practice, having often used them in three out of five there has been a wonderful change in sur

successive cases,-but his plea was, that gery. Many operations are performed his patients demanded their use to shorten successfully now that were very apt to be

their sufferings : and one finding such fatal then, and many more are successful

relief would, on the next occasion, request now that were hardly attempted then.

their use; and he had yet to see che first Still the knife is used most unquestionably

case where evil resulted therefrom. Plain too freely, and the love of the bistoury and

water and soap were his only aseptic scalpel is rife for mischief ofttimes in the agents, and he had never had a case of hands of the young surgeon:

Extremes prierperal fever or blood-poisoning, and will meet, hobbies will be ridden, and but

still continued the same course. one remedy can only be employed by

I have never used the forceps but in Cancer and malignant affections

three cases,-one a noted malformation: are still treated by the knife, though de

one in convulsions; and one at the suggesclared by our ablest surgical writers " to

tion of a consulting physician. I have be no remedy," and the constant failures never had but one case of child-bed fever, have driven thousands to the

brought on, I think, by imprudently washspecialists,” called by us, “ quacks," though ing and changing of the patient,-producthe most of them are duly educated physi- ing the chill,—and she died. Threatening clans, and are equal to the majority of us

cases have always been warded off, and I in intelligence, but who have taken up this

too, like my brother above alluded to, have special branch of surgery from necessity;

never used but the best soap and water from the simple fact that our surgeons and

at my command, and in many lowly habitawe who swear in verba magistrorum, will

tions, the former was very poor. We are not change our practice and treat them by

inclined to think that there is a great fuss escharotics, which treatment has been

made about asepsis that is more profitable shown and proven over and over again far

to the manufacturer than to the doctor or superior to and much more successful

his patient. Gelsemium, veratrum viride, than the knife. It is high time that every

the viburnums, aletris, helonias, etc., are doctor gave his attention to this subject,

valuable additions to obstetrical agents. and prepared himself to treat all cancerous

Laparotomy is a craze that should be affections within the scope of his own

condemned. practice, instead of permitting them, or shall I say, driving them away from home and home comforts to the cancer special

ANTI-NICOTINE CIGARS AND CIGAR

ETTES.-(SANITARY CIGARS). ists, who are springing up in every section of our country. Selections can be made to Editor Medical Summary : meet individual cases, from pure chromic Since the discovery of America, and acid; saturated solution chloride chrom

with it the use of tobacco, hundreds and ium ; arsenical paste, mixed with its anti- thousands of men have been killed by this dote; chloride zinc and sanguinaria, etc., plant, or rather by the poisonous action of etc. And yet these and all others will

the nicotine it contains, as the tobacco sometimes fail, as they have, most unfor

freed from this poisonous alkaloid is harmtunately, in my case.

less and by many considered a pleasant And what shall I say of obstetrical prac. luxury.

The above invention is a device by which the nicotine is kept in harness and absorbed by a certain medicated and sterilized material.

It is simple and harmless ; does not affect the smell or taste of the tobacco, does not spoil the shape of the cigar or cigarette, and adds but very little to the expense of their manufacture.

DR. ALEX. Rixa, 323 E. 86th St., New York.

OPIUM,-OOCAINE AND WHISKEY.

CO

It is therefore astonishing, that in all these centuries, none of our scientists, who have spent their lives in search for the health and welfare of their fellow-beings, ever thought of inventing a device, or some means to prevent the detrimental and deadly effects of tobacco, which, in the shape of cigars and cigarrettes, is so much indulged in by mankind.

The smoker who enjoys his weed does not know that with every whiff he inhales a deadly poison, and that in time, when it becomes habitual with him, it has the most detrimental effect on various vital organs of his body.

Its first and earliest symptoms are nausea and vomiting, as most smokers can testity, but toleration is soon establishedas in all poisons.

In time the habitual smoker will become a dyspeptic by the slow action of the nicotire, and he will also develop a diffused granular irritation of the pharynx. An affection of the spine is in some cases speedily followed by muscular relaxation and paralysis in consequence of nicotine poisoning.

Tobacco is a most powerful depressant of the heart's action.

Nicotine, the active principle of tobacco, is one of the most powerful poisons. One drop is sufficient to kill the strongest dog.

Nicotine produces functional disorder of the heart, which may result in hypertrophy, dilatation and organic diseases.

Smoker's cancer, of which nicotine is the cause, has ĉestroyed many a valuable life. Of the latest known victims we will only mention General Grant and Emperor Frederic of Germany.

The great havoc which excessive cigarette smoking has caused amongst the youths of our country, has brought about legislative action in some states, forbidding, under severe penalty, the manufacture and sale of cigarettes.

Now, the great invention of our age is the anti-nicotine cigar and cigarette, which robs this poisonous but highly enjoyable plant of its deadly fangs, and renders the most excessive smoking harmless, as every cigar and cigarette contains a nicotine absorber, which will not permit any poison to enter into the system by inhalation.

Opium should never be used for any other purpose than a medicine, and then always prescribed by a physician. In case of severe pain and inflammation it is nearly indispensable, but even in these conditions we should be guarded in its use, as a habit is easily formed. It is perhaps easier to form the habit of opium using, than it is of any other drug. Just as soon as we can dispense with its use in any case we should do so, for I have seen the habit produced from only four successive days' use of the drug. In fact I believe there is no medicine we should use with more care than opium. Cocaine is nearly as bad, and I believe just now is being used altogether too extensively. Unfortunately a high authority in medicine, a few years ago pronounced cocaine harmless. The statement published by this noted physician, had done an immense sight of harm, so far as the use of cocaine is concerned. I find a cocaine habit is very easily formed. I have a patient, who I am satisfied comes for treatment of her throat, simply from the pleasurable effect produced. She insists upon the cocaine being used, and very well knows if I attempt to deceive her. To all intents and purposes she has obtained a cocaine habit.

Both opium and cocaine have a very deleterious effect upon the nervous system, and to a certain extent they destroy the intellect.

They destroy reliability and veracity; you cannot depend upon any thing they say so far as their use is concerned. They will tell you they are not using them at all, when perhaps ten minutes before, they have pawned their wedding ring to pro

cure the opium. No woman is strictly dermically, if the stomach is not irritable. moral and virtuous, who has become an There are but few patients who cannot extensive opium eater. Opium destroys be cured of the whiskey habit, provided to a great extent sexual passion, but if they we can induce them to continue the treatcan procure it by selling their chastity, ment three or four weeks. they will not hesitate in doing so. The In regard to a return to the use of sexual congress may even be disgusting whiskey depends altogether upon the paand offensive to them, yet to enable them tient. He can let it alone, or he can use it to get the opium they would even cut off again just as he wills; so far as any treattheir right arm.

ment, or so-called cure of the whiskey I am satisfied we can use means to cure habit being permanent, it is all folderol. the drunkard, but I am not so certain in No treatment will perpetually destroy regards to the opium and cocaine habits. the desire for the use of a stimulant. The

Strychnine, in the form of nitrate, is al- good sense of the patient governs that most a specific for the whiskey habit. The matter entirely. chloride of gold, the so-called Keeley If he wills not to drink again, he will be treatment, is of no account.

permanently cured, but unless he so wills, In connection with the nitrate of strych- he most assuredly will not. If he again nine, I use fd. ext. cinchona, gentian, and tastes whiskey, he will more than likely lactopeptine. Sometimes it is necces

become a drunkard again. sary to use the bromides and chloral. I

Geo. J. MONROE, M. D., believe we had better not use them if we

442 W. Walnut Street, Louisville, Ky. can get along without. When I use any bromide, I generally resort to soda bromide. I only use this until I get my pa

NOTES FROM PRACTICE. tient quieted. I usually find a good mercurial action accomplishes a great deal.

Editor Medical Summary : Alcohol produces a sluggish liver and

I hope the readers of the SUMMARY will indigestion.

not laugh and call me foolish when I make Calomel in divided doses until about

the assertion that soot tea, made from eight grains are used, (I always combine

wood soot, is as valuable in persistent sincalomel with bicarb. soda); this followed

gultus, (hiccough), as musk at $1.00 per by one or two tablespoonfuls of castor oil.

dose, and in the case of the man who had This makes the patient very sick, and

this trouble forty-two days, it was wood while so sick he does not want the alcohol.

soot tea that cured him. This remedy has Good results follow. I keep my patient for

been tried in other cases with beneficial several days on milk soups and broths.

effect, but it was not given by the physi. Lime water added to the milk aids in

cians who attended these cases; but by overcoming the nausea. I push the strych- laymen. This treatment is exceedingly nine as rapidly as I can. While the stom- useful in cholera infantum in its early ach remains irritable I give the strychnine stages and is used much in the rural dishypodermically, but as soon as the nausea tricts. It stops both vomiting and diarrhea subsides I give it by the mouth. There is

by its antiseptic qualities. It should be nothing in the hypodermic injections, given weak. For the continued sore throat unless it may be the impression upon the at this time of the year, when the soreness mind of the patient..

appears to exist more in the muscles of the When a patient has to visit a doctor three neck than in the throat itself; an effervestimes a day, or more, and has an injection cent preparation of acid salicylic in a submade into the arm, he is forcibly reminded stantial dose, every two hours is invaluable. something is going on, this sore arm When the urine in a case of Bright's diswhich almost invariably results, keeps his

ease remains at a sp. gr. of 1009 to 1011, attention to a certain extent away from there is in all probability contracted kidthe whiskey; otherwise there is nothing to neys, which will prove fatal. qe gained by using the strychnine hypo- Alkalinity of the urine is essential in Bright's disease, and if this cannot be ac- sively in these cases; but hot water is just complished by the use of the sodium, and as good, if it has been sterilized by boiling. lithium salts, the case forebodes a fatal Cleanliness is the great remedy to prevent termination. The potash salts should never puerperal peritonitis and septicæmia. be used.

I think that I know of one patient who When one man says that he would rather was greatly damaged by too strong injechave ghonorrhea than a hard cold, I have tions of carbolic acid into the vagina after found ten other men who have said that confinement and the liability in using they would rather have the hard cold ; ex- these strong agents is to do damage if the perience is a good teacher. A solution of the nurse makes a mistake, and they often will peroxide of hydrogen, one part, to five or six if they can. of distilled water is best for the first stage,

W. V. Wilson, M. D., and for the second, corrosive sublimate, gr. j, West Haven, Conn. to Oj of distilled water, for an injection, two or three times a day. As a rule injections

DR. JOHN H. SPURGEON'S CASE OF PERare the cause of a vast amount of mischief

SISTENT DEVELOPMENT OF GENERby being too strong. In the third stage, AL DROPSY, AND ABNORMAL

GROWTH IN THE UTERUS arg. nitrate, gr. j to 3j; or act zinc, gr. j

DURING GESTATION. to 3 ij of water.

The bicarbonate of sodiuin is a most Reply from the stand-point of Dosimetrics. valuable remedy in croup. It is found in almost every house and a mixture for a •She was at that time, (time called) child two years old, that I make is as fol- quite dropsical and also afflicted with lows:

asthma." B. Fid. ext. ipecac, gtt xviij. Iodide pot- The reader will recall that this woman assium, gr. x tc xx; soda bicarb., a tea- was in the third month of gestation, that spoonful; sugar syrup, 24 teaspoonfuls, or the serous fluid was easily removed, but a half of a tumbler. To this may be added soon returned, evidence of serious retroone or two drops of tr. aconite, and ten to grade movement. thirty drops of the tincture of lobelia Anasarca or general infiltration of the Dose one teaspoonful every hour, or half cellular tissue when spontaneous or idiohour; and the dose to be more or less ac- pathic is dependent upon or associated cording to the impression made. Large with deterioration of the blood or an albudoses of quinine are very useful in these

minous condition known by the presence of cases.

albumin in the urine and serous fluids, or I kno v how hard it is to manage cases

effusions, and exist in both the acute and in the country away from a drug store, but

chronic conditions. molasses and soda is almost always at

In the first instance it is an albuminous hand and can be given freely in cases of fever and sometimes passes into the chroncroup, and with good results. Lard and ic state. sugar, or goose oil and molasses, are old In the chronic form, it is a symptom of fashioned remedies and not to be despised parenchymatous nephritis. in emergencies when one is caught with- It may have had its cause in syphilis, out the usual remedies. A cathartic of

chronic malaria, chronic mercurialism, or calomel often plays an important part in

some other poison. It usually has a gradthe recoveries. It is also diaphoretic, and ual onset, seldom noticed until the appeardiuretic,

ance of dropsy begining under the eyes and Hot water at about the temperature of in the face; extending all over the body, 100° having been sterilized by boiling and causing dyspnea, (“asthma"). then allowed to cool is as good a douche The urine under the microscope reveals after confinement as if carbolic acid or casts, granular epithelium etc., I lately corrosive sublimate had been added; and treated a case of similar kind, had its oriwith the knowledge that it will do the pa- gin in anemia, but there was a history of tient no harm. Creolin is now used exten- Bright's disease on both sides of her fam

ily. I was called to her about the sixth Many years ago one of my preceptors month of utero-gestation, found her with delivered a woman at full term of a small dyspepsia, anemia, puffed under the eyes, child and two fleshy moles, the largest was swollen ankles and feet, scanty, dark nrine, about the size of a man's fist and the other short breathing and constipation.

the size of a hen's egg. About an hour Treatment. To reconstitute the blood after the delivery of the placenta which she was given the arseniate of strychnine, was firm, sound and whole, the woman iron phosphate and dosimetric sedlitz salt. suddenly died from hemorrhage during his

To improve the condition of the utero- temporary absence. He arrived just in genital system she was given the uterine time to see her breathe her last. tonic, (see formula on page 330 February Meddlesomeness and disregard of orders number this journal), and to remove drop- to keep the patient quiet on the part of sical effusions through aiding the circula- the woman left in charge, was, partly at tion and the kidneys, the sparteine sul- least, the cause of the fatal event. phate and apocynin were employed.

The presence of tumors impair the tonic The first three as the dominant treat- power of the womb and thereby favor unment, the fourth as a specific to the geni

due relaxation thereof. The presence of talia etc., and the last two, as variant or these growths cannot be detected during symptomatic remedies.

gestation and is only relieved by parturiFrom this improvement in the qual.cy of tion. The unpediculated ones may be susthe blood gradually took place and pari pected by the irregular shape of the abpassu albumen and the dropsy, thanks to dominal protuberance, etc. dosimetric management, slowly but surely Polypi may be made known by frequent subsided.

hemorrhages and sometimes by their proTo the eliminating power of the sedlitz trusion during gestation or at the time of salt and the specific quality f the sparteine labor. as a cardiac tonic and diuretic, much cred- Of the Placenta.-It frequently occurs it is due.

that the placenta is diseased, and from Sparteine and apocynin act without in various causes. Calcarious deposits have any way disordering the stomach. The been found in the substance of the placenlatter, however, when given in dosimetric ta, and even ossification has been observed doses improves its condition.

at the time of birth. Both are forms of Under the method of treatment adopted degeneration. she p ssed through her confinement "with- Furthermore the placenta being an oront a ripple" and in the course of six gan of exhalation, the recremental matter months she had quite recovered in every produced in the circulation of the fætus way and was quite strong.

and being disposed of through the walls of As to the rotten placenta," and abnormal the placental vessels, no doubt, under dia: rowth in the uterus:

thetic or diseased condition of the mother, this growth was most probably a fibroid, causes degeneration of the placental mass. may have been a mole or hydatid; perhaps The system of the mother may become a polypis.

affected, thereby become both cause and Fibroids complicate pregnancies fre

effect. quently. Simpson gives four cases, two of But of all the prolific sources of such which recovered after parturition and two mischief, the one cause; disordered innerdied.

vation, or want of equilibrium between inPolypi do the same, but are less serious nervation and nutrition produces most morthan the fibrous tumors, their long pedicle bid changes in the mother, placenta, and allows of their escap from the cavity and

fætus. First in the mother by excessive render their excision possible.

nutrition, second in the placenta, and third, Moles and Hydatids are occasionally de

in the fætus by mal nutrition or blood poiveloped with the fætus in utero, but inter

soning. fere less with gestation than either of the There is little room for doubt, that variother,

ous defomities of the child, as well as dis.

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