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Houses in Frame for Australia --Emigrants-Blackwall Railway.

CHAPTER XXIV.- p. 317.

VAUXHALL GARDENS.

CHAPTER XXV.-p. 319.

ILLUMINATION OF LONDON,

Homage of the People to the Queen-Aspirations for her welfare

--Political Popularity uncertain.

CHAPTER XXVI.-p. 324.

WINDSOR CASTLE.

Splendour and Taste of George IV.—Private Apartments--State Apartments-Grandeur and Magnificence of St. George's Chapel-Immense value of the Plate Room.

CHAPTER XXVII. p. 342.

THE EAST INDIA HOUSE.

External Architecture-Short Account of the Company-Interior

--Museum-Encouragement to Talent and Genius in the Natives of the East.

CHAPTER XXVIII.p. 358.

STEAM MANUFACTORIES IN LONDON.

CHAPTER XXIX.-p. 362.

THE ROYAL INSTITUTION.

Evening Lecture, by Mr. Goddard-Daguerreotype Portraits.

CHAPTER XXX.-p. 365.

NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS.

Adoption of their opinions, laughable-Valuable as Journals of

Historical Facts—Changes in Politics—Inflammatory Language -Expenses–Opinions on different Papers--Advantages to Society-Anonymous Slander — Annuals -- Reviews -- Edinburgh -Quarterly, &c.

CHAPTER XXXI.—p. 385.

TOUR TO THE NAVAL ARSENALS AND PRINCIPAL

SEAPORTS,

Southampton Railway-Southampton-Portsmouth-Dock Yard

-Plymouth-Devonport-Bristol-Great Western Steam Ship Company-Gloucester-Birmingham-Liverpool-Niger Expedition-Glasgow-Pottery-Asylum for the Blind-GreenockReturn to London and Expense of Tour in Time and Money.

CHAPTER XXXII.-p. 451.

CUSTOMS, AND MANNERS, EDUCATION, &c.

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Salutations indicative of the Climate--Ice-Beautiful appearance

of Snow-Tulips-Fruits-Harvest—Christmas--Advice on Preservation of Health.

CHAPTER XXXV.-p. 487.

CONCLUDING OBSERVATIONS.

CHAPTER I.

VOYAGE FROM BOMBAY TO ENGLAND.

On the twenty-ninth of March the Buckinghamshire was announced to leave, and as the time drew near, we began to feel uneasy. The idea of leaving our homes, the happy island which gave us birth, the sacrifice of comforts we were about to make, and three years' absence from our wives, our parents, and relatives, made us very melancholy; however hope animated us and we reflected with what pleasure we should see them all on our return, and moreover what advantage our countrymen in Bombay would derive by our being acquainted with the resources of a country on which their life and property depended, and we hoped that it would be paving the way for them, and that by our communicating to them what we had seen of England, and her inhabitants, they would be actuated to visit her, and that by the frequent interchange of ideas and feelings much benefit would result to both.

B

On the morning of the twenty-ninth we bade adieu to our families and friends, and many were the tears of sorrow that flowed from all eyes at that critical hour. All were melancholy and sad ; many came on board the ship with us and remained there as long as they could, but oh! what words can paint the grief when we thus severed from each other?

The Captain gave orders to weigh the anchor, and the wide sails were now spread, and the noble ship stood out for sea.

Every soul on board except ourselves, and some native seamen, were full of joy, with the anticipated pleasure of seeing their native land and the associates of their younger days. Our case indeed was different, we were leaving our birth place for a strange country, and had exchanged homely comforts for the troubles of a long sea voyage. We gazed on the happy land we had just left till we could see it no longer.

We soon became reconciled to our lot and contrived means to amuse ourselves as well as we could. For three days and three nights we saw nothing but the wide ocean before, and the sky

over, us.

Our fellow passengers were mostly public servants, whose names would be of very little interest, suffice it to say, that there were upwards of sixty including the children, who were about fifteen in number.

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