The Power of Woman: The Life and Writings of Sarah Moore Grimke

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Mercer University Press, 2003 - Biography & Autobiography - 216 pages
Sarah Moore Grimke (17921873) wanted to become "a useful member of society," a goal she met through her impressive contributions to American social reform during the 1830s. The issue that loomed largest during that decade was slavery, and Sarah became a spokeswoman for and a leader in the abolition movement. As a Southern gentlewoman, her contributions were unique in that she critiqued the institution based on personal experience.But Sarah did more than fight for the rights of slaves. Perhaps her greatest contribution was as an advocate of women's rights. Her feminist beliefs are set forth in her Letters on the Equality of the Sexes (1838). In this collection of letters, she implemented a new hermeneutic to interpret biblical verses traditionally considered to subject women to the tyranny of men. She confronted the subjugation of women based on divine authority and rejected patriarchal interpretations of Scripture. Based on her interpretation of Scripture, Sarah advocated full equality for women in education, vocation, politics, and finances. She became a role model for many women who later became leaders in the suffrage movement, and is still a role model for many today. Sarah Moore Grimke confronted racism and prejudice within church, society, and herself. Most books and articles dealing with the Grimke sisters focus on Angelina, and no biography has been written of Sarah. This is the first book-length treatment of Sarah's life and work, and as such is indispensable reading for those interested in women's studies, racism, suffrage history, and religious history.

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Contents

The Importance of Sarah GrimkÚ
2 The Formative Years and Experiences of Sarah GrimkÚ
7
Sarah GrimkÚs Search for Justice for Slaves and Women
33
Sarah GrimkÚs Commitment to Combat the Institution of Slavery
71
Sarah GrimkÚs Understanding of Gender Equality
115
6 The Latter Years and Contributions of Sarah GrimkÚ
173
Bibliography
191
Index
205
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Page 98 - And Noah awoke from his wine, and knew what his younger son had done unto him. 25 And he said, Cursed be Canaan; A servant of servants shall he be unto his brethren. 26 And he said, Blessed be the LORD God of Shem; And Canaan shall be his servant.
Page 93 - Therefore said he unto them, The harvest truly is great, but the labourers are few : pray ye therefore the Lord of the harvest, that he would send forth labourers into his harvest.
Page 21 - That all and every person and persons whatever, who shall hereafter teach or cause any slave or slaves to be taught to write, or shall use or employ any slave as a scribe in any manner of writing...
Page 7 - Then I said, I will not make mention of him, nor speak any more in his name. But his word was in mine heart as a burning fire shut up in my bones, and I was weary with forbearing, and I could not stay.
Page 140 - Let the woman learn in silence with all subjection. But I suffer not a woman to teach, nor to usurp authority over the man, but to be in silence.
Page 98 - Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth. And the fear of you and the dread of you shall be upon every beast of the earth, and upon every fowl of the air...
Page 100 - That all petitions, memorials, resolutions, propositions or papers, relating in any way, or to any extent whatever, to the subject of slavery, or the abolition of slavery, shall, without being either printed or referred, be laid upon the table, and that no further action whatever shall be had thereon.
Page 107 - Is it not forgetting the great and. dreadful wrongs of the slave in a selfish crusade against some paltry grievance of our own?
Page 48 - The Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery, and for the Relief of Free Negroes Unlawfully held in Bondage, and for Improving the Condition of the African Race," incorporated by Act of Assembly passed the 8th day of December, AD 1789, of which Dr.

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