The Commissariat of Enlightenment: Soviet Organization of Education and the Arts Under Lunacharsky, October 1917-1921

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Cambridge University Press, Jun 6, 2002 - History - 408 pages
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A study in the formation and development of a Soviet government institution after the Revolution of October 1917. The commissariat - which was responsible both for education and the arts - was the main channel of communication between the government and Bolshevik party on the one hand, and the Russian intelligentsia on the other. The commissar, Anatoly Vasilyevich Lunacharsky, was, in his own words, 'a Bolshevik among intellectuals and an intellectual among Bolsheviks'; his closest colleagues were Lenin's wife Krupskaya and the historian Pokrovsky.
 

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Contents

Lunacharsky
1
The establishment of Narkompros
11
School Education
26
Technical and higher education
59
Proletkult
89
The arts
110
Towards reorganization of Narkompros
162
Reorganization
188
Narkompros after reorganization
210
Narkompros and the New Economic Policy
256
Budgetary expenditure on Narkompros estimates
291
Biographical notes
293
Notes
329
Bibliography
362
Index
375
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About the author (2002)

Sheila Fitzpatrick is an Australian historian, born in 1941 in Melbourne Australia. She earned her BA from the University of Melbourne and received her PhD from St Antony's College, Oxford University. She is the a Professor in the Department of History at the University of Sydney, and Emerita Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago. She is the author of numerous books, articles, and book reviews. Her first book was The Commissariat of Enlightenment: Soviet organization of education and the arts under Lunacharsky, 1917-1921 (1970). Her recent work includes My Father's Daughter (2010), A Spy in the Archives (2013), and On Stalin's Team: The Years of Living Dangerously in Soviet Politics. Princeton University Press (2015) for which she was a joint winner of the Prime Minister's Literary Awards 2016, Nonfiction.

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