A Key to the Lock: Or, a Treatise Proving, Beyond All Contradiction, the Dangerous Tendency of a Late Poem, Entituled, The Rape of the Lock, to Government and Religion. By Esdras Barnivelt, Apoth

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Printed in the year, 1723 - 32 pages
 

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Page 17 - Of these am I, who thy protection claim, A watchful sprite, and Ariel is my name. Late, as I rang'd the crystal wilds of air, In the clear mirror of thy ruling star I saw, alas! some dread...
Page 21 - And strike to dust th' imperial tow'rs of Troy; Steel could the works of mortal pride confound, And hew triumphal arches to the ground. What wonder then, fair nymph! thy hairs should feel, The conqu'ring force of unresisted steel?
Page 27 - Or roll the planets through the boundless sky. Some less refined, beneath the moon's pale light, Pursue the stars that shoot athwart the night, Or suck the mists in grosser air below, Or dip their pinions in the painted bow, Or brew fierce tempests on the wintry main...
Page 16 - ... people made to drink her majesty's health. Sir Plume (a proper name for a soldier) has all the circumstances that agree with prince Eugene : Sir Plume, of amber snuffbox justly vain, And the nice conduct of a clouded cane, With earnest eyes 'Tis remarkable, this general is a great taker of snuff, as well as towns...
Page 14 - France, which he fatirically calls romances: hinting thereby, that thefe promifes and proteftations Were no more to be relied on than thofe idle legends. Of thefe he is faid to build an altar ; to intimate that the foundation of his fchemes and honours was fixed upon the French romances abovementioned g. A fan, a garter, half a pair of gloves.
Page 10 - It is a common and just observation, that, when the meaning of any thing is dubious, one can no way better judge of the true intent of it, than by considering who is the author, what is his character in general, and his disposition in particular.
Page 13 - On her white breast a sparkling cross she wore : alluding to the ancient name of Albion, from her white cliffs, and to the cross, which is the ensign of England. II. The baron, who cuts off the lock, or barrier treaty, is the E.
Page 17 - Or o'er the glebe distil the kindly rain; Others on earth o'er human race preside, Watch all their ways, and all their actions guide: Of these the chief the care of nations own, And guard with arms divine the British throne. 'Our humbler province is to tend the fair, Not a less pleasing, though less glorious care; To save the powder from too rude a gale, Nor let th...
Page 22 - The nymph, exulting, fills with shouts the sky, The walls, the woods, and long canals reply. Immediately upon which there follows a malicious insinuation, in the manner of a prophecy (which we have formerly...
Page i - A Key to the Lock; or, a Treatise, proving beyond all Contradiction the dangerous Tendency of a late Poem, entituled, The Rape of the Lock, to Government and Religion, by Esdras Barnevelt, Apothecary,

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