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" What judgment I had, increases rather than diminishes; and thoughts, such as they are, come crowding in so fast upon me that my only difficulty is to choose or to reject, to run them into verse or to give them the other harmony of prose... "
The Critical and Miscellaneous Prose Works of John Dryden: Now First ... - Page 593
by John Dryden - 1800 - 662 pages
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The poets of Great Britain complete from Chaucer to Churchill, Volume 21

John Bell - 1807
...of it, I have no great reason to complain. What judgment I had, increases rather than diminishes ; and thoughts, such as they are, come crowding in so fast upon me, that my only difficulty is to chuse or to reject ; to run them into verse, or to give them the other harmony of prose. I have so...
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The Works of John Dryden: Now First Collected ...

John Dryden, Walter Scott - English literature - 1808
...of it, I have no great reason to complain. What judgment I had, increases rather than diminishes ; and thoughts, such as they are, come crowding in so fast upon me, that my only difficulty is to chuse or to reject, to run them into verse, or to give them the other harmony of prose : I have so...
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The Works of John Dryden: Now First Collected in Eighteen Volumes ..., Volume 11

John Dryden - English literature - 1808
...of it, I have no great reason to complain. What judgment I had, increases rather than diminishes ; and thoughts, such as they are, come crowding in so fast upon me, that my only difficulty is to chuse or to reject, to run them into verse, or to give them the other harmony of prose : I have so...
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The Works of the English Poets, from Chaucer to Cowper: Including ..., Volume 9

Alexander Chalmers - English poetry - 1810
...more of it, I have no great reason to complain. What judgment 1 had increases rather than diminishes ; and thoughts, such as they are, come crowding in so...studied and practised both, that they are grown into i habit, and become familiar to me. In short, though I may lawfully plead some part of the old gentleman's...
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The Works of the English Poets, from Chaucer to Cowper;: Dryden, Smith, Duke ...

Samuel Johnson - English poetry - 1810
...more of it, 1 have no great reason to complain. What judgment 1 had increases rather than diminishes ; and thoughts, such as they are, come crowding in so...verse, or to give them the other harmony of prose. I hare so long studied and practised both, that they are grown into a habit, and become familiar to me....
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The Works of the English Poets, from Chaucer to Cowper: Including ..., Volume 9

Alexander Chalmers - English poetry - 1810
...of it, 1 have no great reason to complain. What judgment 1 liad increases rather than diminishes ; and thoughts, such as they are, come crowding in so...only difficulty is to choose or to reject ; to run I In in into verse, or to give them the other harmony of prose. I have so long .studied and practised...
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The Works of John Dryden: Now First Collected in Eighteen Volumes, Volume 11

John Dryden, Walter Scott - 1821
...of it, I have no great reason to complain. What judgment I had, increases rather than diminishes ; and thoughts, such as they are, come crowding in so fast upon me, that my only difficulty is to chuse or to reject, to run them into verse, or to give them the other harmony of prose : I have so...
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The London Encyclopaedia: Or, Universal Dictionary of Science, Art ..., Volume 7

Thomas Curtis - Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1829
...Was then a knave, but in diminutive. Cotton, What judgment I had, increases rather than diminishes ; and thoughts, such as they are, come crowding in so fast upon me, that my only difficulty is to chose orto reject. Drydeğ. The light of man's understanding is but & short, diminutive, contracted...
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The London encyclopaedia, or, Universal dictionary of ..., Part 2, Volume 10

Thomas Curtis (of Grove house sch, Islington)
...Eaayt. The royal evil to malignant grtnet, Nothing the dire contagion can oppose. HaneU. Verne, or the other harmony of prose, I have so long studied and practised, that they are grown into a habit, and become familiar to me. Dryden. The trespasses of people are grown...
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The Poetical Works of John Dryden, Volume 3

John Dryden - 1832
...of it, I have no great reason to complain. What judgment I had, increases rather than diminishes ; and thoughts, such as they are, come crowding in so fast upon me, that my only difficulty 1s to choose or to reject ; to run them into verse, or to give them the other harmony of prose. I have...
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