The New sporting magazine, Volume 60

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Page 409 - Horatio, what a wounded name, Things standing thus unknown, shall live behind me. If thou didst ever hold me in thy heart, Absent thee from felicity awhile, And in this harsh world draw thy breath in pain, To tell my story.
Page 165 - Where thou wilt, lad, I'll make one ; an I do not, call me villain, and baffle me.* P. Hen. I see a good amendment of life in thee ; from praying, to purse-taking. Enter POINS, at a distance. Fal. Why, Hal, 'tis my vocation, Hal ; 'tis no sin for a man to labour in his vocation.
Page 442 - Can'st thou, O partial sleep ! give thy repose To the wet sea-boy in an hour so rude ; And in the calmest and most stillest night, With all appliances and means to boot, Deny it to a king? Then, happy low, lie down ! Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.
Page 331 - NOVEMBER'S sky is chill and drear, November's leaf is red and sear : Late gazing down the steepy linn, That hems our little garden in, Low in its dark and narrow glen, You scarce the rivulet might ken, So thick the tangled greenwood grew, So feeble...
Page 373 - O! many a shaft at random sent Finds mark the archer little meant! And many a word at random spoken May soothe or wound a heart that's broken!
Page 251 - Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness ! Close bosom-friend of the maturing Sun ! Conspiring with him how to load and bless With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eaves run ; To bend with apples the moss'd cottage-trees...
Page 42 - And sic a night he taks the road in As ne'er poor sinner was abroad in. The wind blew as 'twad blawn its last; The rattling...
Page 215 - PRISONER OF CHILLON. MY hair is gray, but not with years, Nor grew it white In a single night, As men's have grown from sudden fears: My limbs are bow'd, though not with toil, But rusted with a vile repose, For they have been a dungeon's spoil, And mine has been the fate of those To whom the goodly earth and air Are bann'd, and barr'd — forbidden fare...
Page 251 - Then came the Autumn all in yellow clad, As though he joyed in his plenteous store, Laden with fruits that made him laugh, full glad That he had banished hunger, which to-fore Had by the belly oft him pinched sore.
Page 170 - ... minds the necessity of paying the strictest attention to the breed, both as regards the purity of blood, and field qualifications. " A good strain," if once hit upon, ought to be preserved ; and it is alone to be attained by paying the greatest attention to the forms and qualities of both parents.

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