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Page 51 - ... charged with collecting and diffusing information, and enabled by premiums, and small pecuniary aids, to encourage and assist a spirit of discovery and improvement. This species of establishment contributes doubly to the increase of improvement, by stimulating to enterprise and experiment, and by drawing to a common centre the results everywhere of individual skill and observation, and spreading them thence over the whole nation. Experience accordingly has shown, that they are very cheap instruments...
Page 100 - By shutting up the port of Boston, some imagine that the course of trade might be turned hither and to our benefit; but...
Page 101 - The legislature shall, as soon as conveniently may be, provide, by law, for the establishment of schools throughout the State, in such manner that the poor may be taught gratis.
Page 168 - ... and the rural cottage. It is the solitude and freedom of the family home in the country which constantly preserves the purity of the nation, and invigorates its intellectual powers. The battle of life, carried on in cities, gives a sharper edge to the weapon of character, but its temper is, for the most part, fixed amid those communings with nature and the family, where individuality takes its most natural and strongest development.
Page 199 - That the preparation of long fibre for scutching is effected in less than one day, and is always uniform in strength, and entirely free from colour, much facilitating the after-process of bleaching, either in yarns or in cloth.
Page 52 - Mount Vernon, whose soil was once tilled by the hands and is now consecrated by the dust of the Father of his country, should properly belong to the nation, and might with great propriety become, under its auspices, a model farm to illustrate the progress of that pursuit to which he was so much devoted. CENSUS. Shortly after the passage of the act of 23d...
Page 199 - That the fibre, to be mixed with cotton, or spun alone on cotton machinery, is so completely assimilated in its character to that of cotton, that it is capable of receiving the same rich opaque color that...
Page 226 - Professor Low, writing in 1840 in relation to the Short-horn breed, says that at a period "near our own times, it appears that cattle were frequently brought from the opposite continent and mingled with the native Varieties. They were chiefly imported from Holland, the cows of which country were the...
Page 168 - That family, whose religion lies away from its threshold, will show but slender results from the best teachings, compared with another where the family hearth is made a central point of the Beautiful and the Good. And much of that feverish unrest and want of balance between the desire and the...
Page 48 - ... group within ; nothing is to be seen but the conflict of the elements, nor heard but the raving of the storm ; then they all kneel around him, while he recommends them to the protection of Heaven ; and though their little hymn of praise can scarcely be heard even by themselves, as it mixes with the roar of the tempest, they never fail to rise from their devotions with their spirits cheered and their confidence renewed, and go to sleep with an exaltation of mind of which kings and conquerors have...

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