International Law Studies

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1903 - International law
 

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Page 37 - No ship of war or privateer of either belligerent shall hereafter be permitted, while in any port, roadstead, or waters subject to the territorial jurisdiction of her Majesty, to take in any supplies, except provisions and such other things as may be requisite for the subsistence of her crew, and except so much coal only as may be sufficient to carry such vessel to the nearest port of her own country, or to some nearer destination...
Page 39 - Upon the conclusion and signing of this protocol, hostilities between the two countries shall be suspended, and notice to that effect shall be given as soon as possible by each Government to the commanders of its military and naval forces.
Page 42 - The same act which transfers their country transfers the allegiance of those who remain in it; and the law, which may be denominated political, is necessarily changed, although that which regulates the intercourse and general conduct of individuals remains in force until altered by the newly created power of the State.
Page 42 - An Act temporarily to provide for the administration of the affairs of civil government in the Philippine Islands, and for other purposes...
Page 40 - But the boundaries of the United States, as they existed when war was declared against Mexico, were not extended by the conquest ; nor could they be regulated by the varying incidents of war, and be enlarged or diminished as the armies on either side advanced or retreated. They remained unchanged. And every place which was out of the limits of the United States, as previously established by the political authorities of the government, was still foreign ; nor did our laws extend over it.
Page 40 - Philippine islands becomes immediately necessary, and the military government heretofore maintained by the United States in the city, harbor and bay of Manila is to be extended with all possible dispatch to the whole of the ceded territory.
Page 38 - V. The port of Manila, and all other ports and places in the Philippines which may be in the actual possession of our land and naval forces, will be open, while our military occupation may continue, to the commerce of all neutral nations as well as our own in articles not contraband of war, and upon payment of the prescribed rates of duty which may be in force at the time of the importation.
Page 32 - It may therefore be justly laid down as a general proposition, that all persons and property within the territorial jurisdiction of a Sovereign, are amenable to the jurisdiction of himself or his *Courts : and that the exceptions to this rule are such only as, by common usage and public policy, have been allowed, in order to preserve the peace and harmony of nations, and to regulate their intercourse in a manner best suited to their dignity and rights.
Page 37 - The United States is not only a Government, but it is a National Government, and the only government in this country that has the character of nationality.
Page 62 - Having no common superior to judge between them, they stand in precisely the same predicament as two nations who engage in a contest and have recourse to arms.

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