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Close of the Defence of Judge Prescott . . . Webster. 169

Character of Napoleon .

· Phillips. 175

Moral Desolation - -

N. E. W. Review. 176

Conclusion of a Speech in the Trial of W. S. Smith - Emmet. 177

Principles of the American Revolution . . . Quincy. 178

Practice of Religion a source of Enjoyment . .. Logan. 180

Patriotic Exhortation -

Hall. 181

Humorous account of English Taxes . . Ed. Review. 186

The Right of Discovery -

. . . Irving. 187

The Right of Cultivation .

. . . Ibid. 189

The Highlander to his Son . . . . . Scott. 197

Death of King Philip.

• Irving. 199

Swiss Deputy to Charles, Duke of Burgundy . . . Scott. 200

Defence of Mr. Stockdale • . . . . ""Erskine. 202

Pitt on American Affairs in 1775 - - - ... - 208

Property an Element of Society . . . . . Upshur. 210

Necessity of protecting Property . . . . Ibid. 211

Enterprise of New England Colonists • •

Burke. 213

Extract from Mr. Canning's Speech at Plymouth - .

214

Speech of Lord Cavendish on American Affairs - - 221

Influence of Literature and Divine Revelation . . . Wayland. 223

Lord Littleton's Speech on the Jew Bill” . - - - 225

Speech of a Creek Indian in' a Council of his nation - - 226

Extract from Mr. Mercer's Speech ; ;

. . 228

Contrast between Canning and Brougham

Magazine. 234

The same ... - - . . . . Ibid. 236

Character of Oliver Cromwell - - - - - - - Cowley. 238

Devastation of the Carnatic · · · · Burke. 239

Extract from a Speech in the Irish Parliamento - Curran. 246

Extract from a Speech on the Catholic Question . . Gratton. 247

Force of Talents - - - - - - Droight. 249

Atrocities of the French Revolution . . . Roland. 255

The same continued

.

. . Ibid. 256

Perpetual Progress of the Soul in Virtue . . . Logan. 258

Ruinous Consequences of unhallowed Pleasures

.. Ibid. 259

Aborigirals of New England . . .

Sprague. 263

Extract from a Speech on the Judiciary

Morris. 265

Extract from Mr. Everett's Oration at Plymouth 182

267

The Effects of Atheism . . .

Channing. 268

Claims of Africa . . . . . . Burges. 272

Delineation" of Missionary Objects - - o Chalmers. 273

Happiness . .

.

- Cotton. 274

Speech of Mac Briar to the Scotch Insurgents . . Scott. 284

Mr. Burke's Opinion of Junius - - - :

Specimen of the Eloquence of James Otis . - Miss Francis. 287

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. Mrs. Hemans. 23
Addison.

Cornwall.
- - Byron. 35

- - Barton. 48
. . Upham. 49

. . Anon. 50
. . . Croly. 58

. . Knowles. 59
· ·

Moore. 60
., Shakspeare. 67

Knight. 68
. Mrs. Hemans. 79
. . Pierpont. 80

Marco Bozzaris . . . . . Halleck. 90

Moonlight-and a Field of Battle

Shelley. 92

Manfred to the Sorceress -

- Byron. 108

The Sword -

Miss Langdon. 107

Spirit of Freedom . .

· Percival. 113

Parting of Douglas and Marmion

... Scott. 114

The Spirit firm and free .

." Anon. 122

What's Hallowed Ground .

. Campbell. 123

Absalom's Dream . . .

Hillhouse. 136

The Deluge

Bowles. 138

The Leper - - - -

Willis.

Counsel of Ahithophel to Absalom · · · · Hillhouse. 151

Counsel of Hushai .

. Ibid. 151

Speech of Raab Kiuprili .

· Coleridge. 152

Speech of William Tell

· Knowles. 158

Rienzi to the Romans .

. . . Moore. 158

Parody on Hamlet's Soliloquy · · · · Anon. 163

Tyrolese War Song . . . . . . Anon. 171

Leonidas . . .

. . Croly. 172

Duke of Milan to Charles V.

Massinger. 173

Burial of Sir John Moore . . . . . Wolfe. 183

The Star . .

. . : Read. 184

Warren's Address to the American Soldiers . . Pierpont. 185

Christ stilling the Tempest - . - - Mrs. Hemans. 185

Spectacles ! - -

Byrom. 190

Bernardo Del Carpio . . . . Mrs. Hemans. 191

Soliloquy of Wallenstein

Schiller. 196

The Eagle · · · · · · · Percival. 203

Cassabianca . . . . . . . Mrs. Hemans. 205

Regulus . . . . . . . Dale. 206

Dionysius to his Soldiers . . . . . Murphy. 216

Zanga's Reasons for hating Alonzo - . : : Young. 216

An Ode . . . . . . . · Hughes. 229

The Soldier's Dream . . . . . . Campbell. 231

Absalom . . . . . . . Willis. 231

The Newspaper . . . . . . . Cowper. 241

Night

. . Smith. 243

Stanzas . . . . . . . Watts. 250

Jacob's Dream .

• Anon. 252

Address of Alasco to his Countrymen . . . Shee. 253

Bishop of Carlisle's Speech in defence of Richard II. . Shakspeare. 254

Rienzi's Address to the Romans . . . Miss Mitford. 260

The Death of Leonidas . . . . . Croly. 261

Echoes · · · · · · Proctor. 262

Greece . . . . . . . Byron. 276

Landing of the Pilgrim Fathers . : Mrs. IIemans. 277

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THE

ACADEMICAL SPEAKER.

EXTRACT FROM A SPEECH OF PATRICK HENRY IN THE LEGISLA

TURE OF VIRGINIA, IN FAVOUR OF PERMITTING THE BRITISH REFUGEES TO RETURN TO THE UNITED STATES.

The personal feelings of a politician ought not to be permitted to enter these walls. The question before us is a national one, and in deciding it, if we act wisely, nothing will be regarded but the interest of the nation. On the altar of my country's good, I, for one, am willing to sacrifice all personal resentments, all private wrongs; and I flatter myself that I am not the only man in this house, who is capable of making such a sacrifice.

We have, Sir, an extensive country, without population. What can be a more obvious policy than that this country ought to be peopled? People form the strength and constitute the wealth of a nation. I want to see our vast forests filled up, by some process a little more speedy than the ordinary course of nature. I wish to see these states rapidly ascending to that rank, which their natural advantages authorize them to hold among the nations of the earth.

Cast your eyes, Sir, over this extensive country. Observe the salubrity of your climate; the variety and fertility of your soil; and see that soil intersected, in every quarter, by bold navigable streams, flowing to the East and to the West, as if the finger of Heaven were marking out the course of your settlements, inviting you to enterprise, and pointing the way to wealth.

Sir, you are destined, at some period or other, to become a great agricultural and commercial people: the only question is, whether you choose to reach this point by slow gra

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