The Legitimacy of Truth: Proceedings of the III Meeting Italian-American Philosophy

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Riccardo Dottori
LIT Verlag Münster, 2003 - Philosophy - 439 pages
This volume contains the Proceedings of the Third meeting Italian/American Philosophy that took place in Rome in June 5-10, 2001. What is "Truth" in Analytic Philosophy after the linguistic turn? What can we say about "Truth" in Hermeneutics, after taking into account the so-called hermeneutical circle? According to Nietzsche: "Truth is that form of error without which human beings could not live." From this definition it follows: "The point is not the rightness of theory but its importance for human existence." Could we say the same from an epistemological point of view? Who (or what) could be the neutral arbiter among different conceptual schemes? Can an interpretative paradigm stand in as a substitute for traditional objectivity? The controversial problem of "Truth," however, must be discussed within the various fields of philosophy: Aesthetics, Logic, Epistemology, Ethics and Politics. In view of this, Hermeneutics and Analytic Philosophy converged to create the body of this meetin

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Contents

I
5
IV
11
V
21
VII
39
VIII
67
IX
79
X
111
XI
135
XXI
241
XXIV
265
XXV
271
XXVIII
303
XXIX
313
XXX
327
XXXI
333
XXXII
345

XIII
149
XIV
164
XVI
171
XVII
189
XVIII
201
XX
211
XXXIII
367
XXXV
377
XXXVI
403
XXXVII
427
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Page 138 - Wordsworth on the other hand, |was to propose to himself as his object, to give the charm of novelty to things of every day, and to excite a feeling analogous to the supernatural by awakening the mind's attention from the lethargy of custom and directing it to the loveliness and the wonders of the world before us; an inexhaustible treasure, but for which, in consequence of the film of familiarity and selfish solicitude, we have eyes, yet see not, ears that hear not, and hearts that neither feel nor...
Page 137 - For a multitude of causes, unknown to former times, are now acting with a combined force to blunt the discriminating powers of the mind, and, unfitting it for all voluntary exertion, to reduce it to a state of almost savage torpor. The most effective of these causes are the great national events which are daily taking place, and the increasing accumulation of men in cities, where the uniformity of their occupations produces a craving for extraordinary incident, which the rapid communication of intelligence...
Page 136 - Poems was to choose incidents and situations from common life, and to relate or describe them, throughout, as far as was possible in a selection of language really used by men, and, at the same time, to throw over them a certain colouring of imagination, whereby ordinary things should be presented to the mind in an unusual aspect...
Page 143 - Paradise, and groves Elysian, Fortunate Fields— like those of old Sought in the Atlantic Main— why should they be A history only of departed things, Or a mere fiction of what never was? For the discerning intellect of Man, When wedded to this goodly universe In love and holy passion, shall find these A simple produce of the common day.
Page 125 - We speak of understanding a sentence in the sense in which it can be replaced by another which says the same; but also in the sense in which it cannot be replaced by any other. (Any more than one musical theme can be replaced by another...
Page 140 - No more shall grief of mine the season wrong; I hear the Echoes through the mountains throng, The Winds come to me from the fields of sleep, And all the earth is gay; Land and sea...
Page 140 - What was so fugitive! The thought of our past years in me doth breed Perpetual benediction: not indeed For that which is most worthy to be blest; Delight and liberty, the simple creed Of Childhood, whether busy or at rest, With new-fledged hope still fluttering in his breast...
Page 94 - The problems arising through a misinterpretation of our forms of language have the character of depth. They are deep disquietudes; their roots are as deep in us as the forms of our language and their significance is as great as the importance of our language.
Page 145 - Standing on the bare ground, my head bathed by the blithe air, and uplifted into infinite space, all mean egotism vanishes. I become a transparent eyeball. I am nothing. I see all. The currents of the Universal Being circulate through me ; I am part and particle of God.

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