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Ennis "Abbey," or Franciscan Convent—Canopy of Inchiquin Tomb, .. 150

,, Foliage on Inchiquin Tomb, .. .. .. ., ,. 151

„ Corbels of Belfry 152

,, Screen and Details, .. .. ., .. .. .. it.

Figure of St. Francis 153

,, "EcceHomo," ib.

Early Pavement Tiles in Ireland :—

•Figs. 1- 4, Floral Designs, to fat* 171

• „ 5- 8, „ „ 172

• „ 9-12, ,. 173

. ( ,, 13-14, „ \ 174

\ ,, 15-16, Geometric Designs, j

• „ 17-21, „ 175

Flint Spear-head of Danish Origin, found at Scarriff, 177

Origins of Prehistoric Ornament in Ireland :—

Figs. 36. Funeral Dm found in Crete, .. .. .. .. .. 204

„ 37, 38. Bronze Sword-hilts—Hungary, 205

„ 39-44. Details Spiral Ornament—Denmark, &c., 206

„ 45-48. Details Half-circle Ornament, 207

49. „ „ 208

„• 50-51. Urns 209

„ 52. Urns 210

„ 53. Details, ib.

Goad-Spur found near Tinahely, .. .. .. .. 212

Heel-guard of Spur. Pattern in Niello work, 213

One-piece Boat found at Maghery, 224

Carrick Castle, Elizabethan Front, 232

Tory Island—St. Columba's Cross, Church, and Tower, 240

,, Doorway of Round Tower, .. .. .. .. ..241

Clare Island, from the Mainland, .. 244

,, Crania Uaile's Castle, ib.

Tomb of O'Maille 245

Aran Islands:—

Diagram of Inishmore, .. ., .. .. .. .. .. 250

Inscribed Stone, "VII. Romani," 251

Inscription—" Bran The Pilgrim," .. .. .. .. .. 252

Inscribed Stone, " Ci Brecani," .. .. ib.

Cross at Temple Brecan, 253

Temple Brecan—General View, .. .. .. .. .. .. ib.

,, Cross, now prostrate, .. .. .. .. .. 254

,, St. Brecan's Bed 255

Clochan-na-Carraige, .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 256

Dun JEngus—Chevaux de frise, 257

„ General View, ib.

Doorway, 258

Temple mac Duach, .. 259

„ Doorway, 260

Sketch Plan of Primitive Stone Houses at Baile-na-Sean, .. ..261

Holed-stone, 262

Arkin Castle, Killeany Bay 263

Map of Iararna, • • • • 265

Plan of Dun Conor, Middle Island, 267

Aran Islands:— Paok

Kilcananagh Doorway, .. .. .. .. .. •. •. 268

,, General View from East, .. .. .. .. ib.

,, East Window 269

View from West 270

Teampull Choemhain 273

„ Doorway, ..

View of Corcomroe in 1837, 281

Oughtmama, .. ,. .. .. .. .. .. .. • • .. 283

Roscam Round Tower, .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 285

„ ,, Doorway, .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 286

,, Holed-stone, '*

Clare Galway Priory in 1870 287

Church of St. Nicholas, Galway, in 1870, 293

Franciscan Friary and Castle, Athenry, .. .. .. .. .. .. 297

Dominican Friary, Athenry, from S.E., 298

N.E., 299

S.W a.

Loughcrew Hills:—

Inscribed Stones in Cairn " L," 307

"T," 309

Fragments of Earthenware Urns from Caim R2, .. .. .. ..312

„ of Pegs made from Tines of Antlers, .. .. .. .. 313

Objects from Slieve-na-Caillighe .. .. 315

Clonmore Castle, Co. Louth, .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 318

Roch Castle, Co. Louth, 320

Tower of Franciscan Convent, Dundalk, .. .. 321

Seal of Theobald de Verdon, 324

Tombstone of George Verdon at Kilmallock, 327

Tombstone in Ardfert Priory Church, .. .. .. .. .. .. 331

"Floreat Rex " Coinage 339

Kilkenny Confederate Coinage, .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 341

Tower of Abbey Church of SS. Peter and Paul, Selskar, 372

St. Patrick's Church, Wexford 373

St. Mary's Church, Wexford, 374

Glonogra Church—East Window 378

Urn found in Cairn on Forth Mountain, near Wexford, .. .. .. 384

Augustinian Monastery, Fems, .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 404

Crosses at Ferns, .. .. .. .. .. .. 405

Ferns Castle, 406

THE JOURNAL

OF

THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF ANTIQUARIES

OF IRELAND,
FOR THE YEAR 1895.

PAPERS AND PROCEEDINGS-PART I. FIRST QUARTER, 1895.

ON AN OGAM INSCRIPTION LATELY DISCOVERED NEAR
GORTATLEA, COUNTY KERRY.

By The RIGHT REV. CHARLES GRAVES, D.D., M.R.I.A.,
Bishop Op Limerick, Ardpbrt, And Aghadob, Vice-president.

In the autumn of 1893 a stone bearing an Ogam inscription was discovered in the outer ring of a rath on the land of Mr. J. B. M'Quinn, about a quarter of a mile from the Gortatlea station on the railway between Tralee and Killarney. (Ordnance Survey, Kerry, Sheet 39.) When found, it was projecting inwards from the western side of the embankment. But there is every reason to suppose that it originally stood upright. I was not informed of its existence until the summer of 1894, when Dr. Frazer kindly drew my attention to it. I lost no time in visiting the monument, and received in the examination of it valuable assistance from Mr. M'Quinn, near whose house it had been placed. Since then my friend the Rev. Patrick Sweeny has furnished me with a pen-drawing, an excellent rubbing, and paper casts, which enable me to pronounce a decided opinion upon the reading of the inscription.

With the exception of a small portion of the stone broken off at the top, which may have contained characters representing, at the most, three or four letters, the inscription is complete and perfectly legible, except a

JOUR. K.8.A.I., VOL. V., FT. I., OTh sek. B

single stroke about which some doubt might be entertained. It consists of two lines written from the bottom upwards, which are to be read thus:—

1. NIOTTACOBRANORA . . .

2. DUMELI MAQI GLASICONA8.

The second line is complete. The first may, perhaps, want a few characters following the one which I have set down as A, but which may have been any other vowel. There would have been room on the edge of the stone for about ten strokes between that A and the final s of Glasiconas. The vowel preceding the second a may have been an A.

I now proceed to deal with the first line of the inscription, after calling the reader's attention to a point in the transliteration which deserves his notice. I allude to the duplication of the T in Niotta. This is in accordance with a practice not uncommon in Ogam writing, the doubling of a consonant generally denoting, according to my view, that it was to be modified in some way. Thus the name Carthach might be spelt as CAeTTAC. So again Tooittacc would be the Ogamic representation of Toigthach.

Niotta appears to have been equivalent to the later Irish Nia, or Niadh, or Niath, explained in dictionaries and glossaries as—(a) meaning a hero or champion, and also used (J) as an adjective with the signification fierce, strong. We find it, moreover (c), as a proper name, e.g. Nia, son of Cucongalt,1 Nia, son of Cormac," and (rf) as an element in compound proper names, e.g. in Nia Sedhamain,3 Crimhthann Niadhnair,1 Enna Niadh,5 Nia Mor,6 and in a form closely resembling Niotta, in Niothfruich,1 Niothfer.8

In the form Neta or Netta it occurs in six other Irish Ogam inscriptions, viz. :—

Neta Segamonas (Ardmore).
Neta Segemon (Island).
Neta Ttrenalugos (Monataggart).
Netacari Netacagni (Castletimon).
Nettacu (Topped Mountain).

To these should be added the Bridell (Welsh) inscription, which contains the name Nettasagru.*

We are not in a position to discuss the question whether the person commemorated by this monument was a professional champion. I find in M. de Jubainville's article in the Revue Celtique10 no mention of

1 Annals of the Four Masters, A.d. 771. 1 lb., A.d. 178. s lb., A.m. 4881.

4 lb., A.m. S193. s lb., A.d. 241. 6 Book of Ballymote, fol. 142.

'Book of Armagh, fol. 15. b. 1; Stokes, Trip., p. 331.

8 Book of Armagh, fol. 14. a. 1; Stokes, Trip., p. 325.

• Reading very doubtful. See Hiibner, Inscr. Brit. Christ., p. 37.

10 Vol. vu., pp. 11-20.

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