The three colonies of Australia: New South Wales, Victoria,South Australia, their pastures, copper mines & gold fields

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Contents

II
19
III
22
IV
29
V
37
VI
55
VII
63
VIII
84
IX
95
XV
197
XVI
212
XVII
223
XVIII
257
XIX
295
XX
321
XXI
323
XXII
329

X
133
XI
141
XII
166
XIII
173
XIV
181
XXIII
346
XXIV
357
XXV
374
XXVI
381
XXVII
417

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Page 426 - That plenary powers of legislation should be conferred upon and exercised by the Colonial Legislature for the time being, and that no bills should be reserved for the signification of Her Majesty's pleasure, unless they affect the prerogatives of the Crown or the general interests of the Empire.
Page 82 - Beside the bed where parting life was laid, And sorrow, guilt, and pain, by turns dismay'd, The reverend champion stood. At his control, Despair and anguish fled the struggling soul ; Comfort came down the trembling wretch to raise, And his last falt'ring accents whisper'd praise.
Page 95 - ... support were given, as required, to every one of the three grand divisions of Christians indifferently, and the management of the temporalities of their Churches left to themselves, I conceive that the Public Treasury might in time be relieved of a considerable charge ; and, what is of much greater importance, the people would become more attached to their respective Churches, and be more willing to listen to and obey the voice of their several Pastors.
Page 95 - I would observe that, in a new country, to which persons of all religious persuasions are invited to resort, it will be impossible to establish a dominant and endowed Church without much hostility, and great improbability of its becoming permanent. The inclination of these Colonists, which keeps pace with the spirit of the age, is decidedly adverse to such an institution ; and I fear the interests of religion would be prejudiced by its establishment.
Page 73 - The commercial regulations of the colony have in many instances been so impolitic as much to discourage mercantile speculation; for many years a maximum price was imposed by the Governor upon all imported merchandize ; and at this price, often too low to afford a fair profit to the trader, the whole cargo was distributed amongst the civil and military officers of the settlement, who alone, had liberty to purchase; and articles of the first necessity were afterwards retailed by them, at an enormous...
Page 393 - A few days ago an educated aboriginal formerly attached to the Wellington Mission, and who has been in the service of WJ Kerr, Esq., of Wallawa about seven years, returned home to his employer with the intelligence that he had discovered a large mass of gold amongst a heap of quartz upon the run whilst tending his sheep. Gold being the universal topic of conversation, the curiosity of this sable son of the forest was excited, and provided with a tomahawk he had amused himself by exploring the country...
Page 107 - The question, I would beg leave to submit, is simply this: How may this Government turn to the best advantage a state of things, which it cannot wholly interdict?
Page 77 - The land here is level, and the first met with unencumbered with timber. It is not of very considerable extent, but abounds with a great variety of herbs and plants, such as would probably highly interest and gratify the scientific botanist. This beautiful little valley runs north-west and south-east between hills of easy ascent thinly covered with timber. Leaving Sidmouth Valley, the country becomes again hilly, and in other respects resembles very much the country to the eastward of the valley...
Page 106 - The proprietors of thousands of acres already find it necessary, equally with the poorer settlers, to send large flocks beyond the present boundary of location to preserve them in health throughout the year. The colonists must otherwise restrain the increase, or endeavour to raise artificial food for their stock. Whilst nature presents all around an unlimited supply of the most wholesome nutriment, either course would seem a perverse...
Page 78 - River, takes a winding course through the plains, which can be easily traced from the high lands adjoining, by the particular verdure of the trees on its banks, which are likewise the only trees throughout the extent; of the plains. — The level and clean surface of these plains gives them at first view very much the appearance of lands in a state of cultivation.

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