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Sixthly—We the head-men, for ourselves and people, do promise to apprehend and secure any negro or other slave, which shall runaway from any of the English settlements to our nation, and to carry them either to this town, or Savannah or Palachuckola garrison, and there to deliver him up to the commander of such garrison, and to be paid by him four blankets or two guns, or the value thereof in other goods; provided such runaway negro or other slave, shall be taken by us or any of our people on the farther side of Oconee river; and in case such negro or runaway slave, shall be taken on the hither side of the said river, and delivered to the commanders aforesaid, then we understand the pay to be one gun or the value thereof; and in case we or our people should kill any such slave for resistance or running away from us in apprehending him, then we are to be paid one blanket for his head, by any trader, for carrying such slaves head unto him. Lastly—We promise with stout hearts and love to our brothers the English, to give no encouragement to any other white people but themselves, to settle amongst us, and that we will not have any correspondence with the Spaniards or French, and to show that we both for the good of ourselves, our wives and children, do firmly promise to keep the the talk in our hearts, as long as the sun shall shine or the waters run in the rivers. We have each of us set the marks of our families.

Schedule of the prices of goods agreed on, annexed : . Two yards of stroud, . Five buck-skins. One yard of plains, . . . One ditto. White blanket, . . . . Five ditto. Blue ditto, . . . . Three ditto. A gun, . . . . . Ten ditto. A pistol, . . . . . . Five ditto. A gun lock, . . . . . Four ditto. Two measures of powder, One ditto. Sixty bullets, . . . . Ditto ditto. One white shirt, . . . Two ditto. , . One knife, . . . . . One doe-skin. Eighteen flints, . . . . One buck-skin. Three yards of cadiz, . . . One doe-skin. Ditto ditto of gartering, Ditto ditto. One hoe, . . . . . . Two buck-skins. One axe, . . . . . . Ditto ditto. One large hatchet, . . . Three doe-skins. One small ditto, . . . One buck-skin. Brass kettles per lb. . . Ditto ditto. Doe-skins were estimated at half the value of the bucks. And whereas the said trustees are greatly desirous to maintain and preserve an inviolable peace, friendship and commerce between the said head-men of the lower nation of Creeks, and the people of the said trustees, have sent and shall send to inhabit and settle in the province of Georgia aforesaid, to endure to the worlds end. Now know ye, that we the said trustees for Y 2

establishing the colony of Georgia in America, do by these presents, ratify and confirm the said articles of friendship and commerce, between the trustees for establishing the colony of Georgia in America, and the chief men of the lower Creeks, and all and every of the articles and agreements therein contained, and also the rates and prices of goods above mentioned, settled and agreed upon before the said head-men, and annexed to the said treaty of trade and friendship. In witness whereof the common council of the said trustees for establishing the colony of Georgia in America, have to these presents made fast the common scal of the corporation of the said trustees, the eighteenth day of October, in the seventh year of the reign of our sovereign lord, George the second, by the grace of God, of Great-Britain, France and Ireland, king, defender of the faith, &c. and in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and thirty-three. By order of the said common council. BENJAMIN MARTYN, Secretary,

JNo. 3.-Refer to page 141.

Proceedings of the assembled estates of all the lower Creek nation, on saturday, the eleventh day of August, one thousand seven hundred and thirty-nine.

BY powers from his most sacred majesty George the second, by the grace of God, king of Great-Britain, France and Ireland, &c. General James Oglethorpe being appointed commissioner, was present in behalf of his majesty, and opened the assembly by a speech. There was also present at the said assembly of estates, Mico or chief king of the Coweta town, Chickeley Nenia Mico, of the said town, Malatche Mico, son of Brim, late emperor of the Creek nation, and the chiefs and warriors of the Coweta town, and the Mico or king of the Cusetas, and Schishel go Mico, next to the king of the Cusetas; Iskegio, third chief man of the Cusetas, a d the other chief men and warriors of the said town; and also Ochaohapko, one of the chief men of the town of Palachuckolas : Killatee, chief war captain, and

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other chief men and warriors, being deputies

sent with full powers to conclude all things for the said town—'I'owmawme Mico of the Ufawles, with several other chief men and warriors, beig deputies sent with full powers to conclude all things for the said towns—Matalcheko was captain of the Echeetees, with several other chief

men and warriors, being sent with full powers to conclude all things for the said town—Neathaklo, chief man of the Owichees, with several other chief men and warriors, being deputies sent with full powers to conclude "all things for the said town—Occullaviche, chief man of the Chehaws, with several other chief men and warriors, being deputies sent with full powers to conclude all things for the said town—Hewanawge Thaleekeo, chief man of the Oakmulgee, with several of the chief men and warriors, being deputies sent with full powers to conclude all things for the said town—The Mico, king of the Oconees, with several chief men and warriors, having full powers to conclude all things for the said town— Neachackelo, second chief man of the Swagles, with several other chief men and warriors, being deputies sent with full powers to conclude all things for the said town. The said estates being solemnly held in full convention, by general James Oglethorpe, on behalf of the trustees of the one part, and the kings, chiefs and warriors aforesaid, on the other part, according to the forms, religion and customs, transmitted down by their ancestors. The whole estates declared by general consent, without one negative, that they adhered to their ancient love to the king of Great-Britain, and to their agreement made in the year 1733, with the trustees, for establishing the colony of Georgia in America, a counterpart of which agreement was

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