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OF

OPERATIVE DENTISTRY.

BY

THOMAS FILLEBROWN, M.D., D.M.D.,

PROFESSOR OF OPERATIVE DENTISTRY IN THE DENTAL SCHOOL OF HARVARD UNIVERSITY;
MEMBER OF THE AMERICAN DENTAL ASSOCIATION, AMERICAN

ACADEMY OF DENTAL SCIENCE, ETC.

WRITTEN BY INVITATION

OF THE

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF DENTAL FACULTIES.

THREE HUNDRED AND THIRTY ILLUSTRATIONS.

PHILADELPHIA:
P. BLAKISTON, SON & CO.,

IOI2 WALNUT STREET.

Copyright, 1889, by P. BLAKISTON, SON & Co.

PRESS OF WM., F. FELL & Oo.,
1220-24 SANSOM ST.,

PHILADELPHIA.

5501

Fq8g

PREFA C.E.

For many years the author has felt that there was need of a text-book on Operative Dentistry, that should be confined more especially to the descriptions of the manual operations required for the preservation of the natural teeth.

This volume is the result of this feeling, quickened by the invitation of the National Association of Dental Faculties to undertake the work.

With what success it is accomplished, the future will determine. The author hopes that it may at least serve as one step toward the production of something that shall serve the purpose fully. The effort has been made to avoid unnecessary detail and to leave out all that could be dispensed with, consistently with clearness.

Hence History has not been attempted, and only enough of definitions, etiology and symptoms of diseases given to make clear the description of the operation to be performed. While intending to include the principles involved in all ways of performing each operation, repetitions under the heads of different methods have been avoided, and authors' names have been generally omitted from the text.

The work is not intended as a substitute for larger works, but as an epitome of the practical application of the principles discussed at length in more extensive volumes, and to these the student is referred for exhaustive discussion.

The most advanced nomenclature has been adopted as far as professional sentiment would sustain the author.

Canine has been left for dogs and cuspid constantly used. Tartar has been discarded as unscientific, and calculus substituted. Hypercementosis seems to fully express the con

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