Historical and Descriptive Anecdotes of Steam-engines, and of Their Inventors and Improvers, Volume 1

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Wightman and Cramp, 1829 - Inventors

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Page 51 - ... to keep them sweet, running through several streets, and so performing the work of scavengers, as well as furnishing the inhabitants with sufficient water for their private occasions...
Page 308 - Mr. Wilkinson has bored us several cylinders almost without error ; that of 50 inches diameter, which we have put up at Tipton, does not err the thickness of an old shilling in any part.
Page 34 - Or if neither of these ways will serve, yet I do seriously, and upon good grounds, affirm it possible to make a flying chariot, in which a man may sit, and give such a motion unto it, as shall convey him through the air. And this perhaps might be made large enough to carry divers men at the same time, together with food for their viaticum, and commodities for traffic.
Page 188 - I intend, in many cases, to employ the expansive force of steam to press on the pistons, or whatever may be used instead of them, in the same manner as the pressure of the atmosphere is now employed in common fire engines. In cases where cold water cannot be had in plenty, the engines may be wrought by this force of steam only, by discharging the steam into the open air, after it has done its office.
Page 47 - A century of the names and scantlings of such inventions, as at present I can call to mind to have tried and perfected...
Page 50 - I have seen the water run like a constant fountain stream forty feet high ; one vessel of water rarefied by fire driveth up forty of cold water. And a man that tends the work is but to turn two cocks, that one vessel of water being consumed, another begins to force and re-fill with cold water, and so successively, the fire being tended and kept constant, which the self-same person may likewise abundantly perform in the interim between the necessity of turning the said cocks.
Page 51 - ... but unanimously, and with harmony agreeing they all augment and contribute strength unto the intended work and operation: And therefore I call this A Semi-omnipotent Engine, and do intend that a Model thereof be buried with me.
Page 50 - I have taken a piece of a whole cannon, whereof the end was burst, and filled it three quarters full of water, stopping and screwing up the broken end, as also the touch-hole ; and making a constant fire under it, within twenty-four hours it burst, and made a great crack...
Page 51 - Diameter, so naturally, that the work will not be heard even into the next Room; and with so great ease and Geometrical Symmetry, that though it work day and night from one end of the year to the other, it will not require forty shillings reparation to the whole Engine, nor hinder ones day-work.
Page 202 - If it should be said that this is not a new invention, because I make use of the same power to drive my machine that others have made use of to drive theirs for other purposes, I answer, The application of this power is no more than the application of any common or known instrument used in mechanism, for new invented purposes.

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