History of England from the Peace of Utrecht to the Peace of Versailles: 1713-1783

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Page 493 - Then he instructed a young nobleman, that the best poet in England was Mr. Pope (a Papist), who had begun a translation of Homer into English verse, for which he must have them all subscribe. 'For' says he, 'the author shall not begin to print till I have a thousand guineas for him'.
Page 137 - The Earl of Oxford was removed on Tuesday, — " the Queen died on Sunday! What a world is " this, and how does Fortune banter us !" says Bolingbroke.* * Letter to Swift, Aug.
Page 14 - That, in case the Crown and imperial dignity of this realm shall hereafter come to any person not being a native of this kingdom of England, this nation be not obliged to engage in any war for the defense of any dominions or territories which do not belong to the Crown of England without the consent of Parliament.
Page 276 - ... if he was disappointed in us, we were tenfold more so in him. We saw nothing in him that looked like spirit. He never appeared with cheerfulness and vigour to animate us. Our men began to despise him ; some asked if he could speak. His countenance looked extremely heavy. He cared not to come abroad amongst us soldiers, or to see us handle our arms or do our exercise. Some said the circumstances he found us in dejected him ; I am sure the figure he made dejected us ; and, had he sent us but five...
Page 14 - Crown and imperial dignity of this realm shall hereafter come to any person, not being a native of this kingdom of England, this nation be not obliged to engage in any war for the defence of any dominions or territories which do not belong to the Crown of England, without the consent of Parliament. 3. That no person who shall hereafter come to the possession of this Crown shall go out of the dominions of England, Scotland, or Ireland, without consent of Parliament.
Page 120 - My Lords, I have many children, and I know not whether God Almighty will vouchsafe to let me live to give them the education I could wish they had ; therefore, my Lords, I own I tremble when I think that a certain divine, who is hardly suspected of being a Christian (meaning, as we read in the annals, Dr. Swift,) is in a fair way of being a bishop, and may one day give licence to those who shall be intrusted with the instruction of youth.
Page 407 - Walpole was, however, fond of perusing and quoting Horace, to whom, in his private character, he might, perhaps, not unaptly be compared. He was good-tempered, joyous, and sensual, with an elegant taste for the arts; a warm friend, an indulgent master, and a boon companion. We are told of him, that whenever he received a packet of letters, the one from his gamekeeper was usually the first which he opened. To women he was greatly addicted, and his daughter by his second wife was born before their...
Page 99 - ... owed gratitude to Steele for having repelled in the Guardian a libel on his sister, and he rose to make his maiden speech in defence of her defender.
Page 55 - that it was true he had a great hand in making the " Union : that the chief reason that moved him to it was " the securing the Protestant Succession, but that he was " satisfied that might be done as well now if the Union " were dissolved ; and that, if it were not, he did not " expect long to have either property left in Scotland or "liberty in England!"* It does not appear that Bolingbroke — undoubtedly the greatest orator of the time — took any part in the debate.
Page 15 - Commissions be made Quamdiu se bene gesserint, and their salaries ascertained and established ; but upon the Address of both Houses of Parliament it may be lawful to remove them.

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