Page images
PDF
EPUB

follows the most decided wishes of the people of Ireland. We are clear, we have been so from the first, that His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales ought, and must be the Regent ; but we are also clear, that he should be in. vested with the full regal power-plenitude of royal power.

6 The limitations which the Member purposes to impose, are suggested with a view to preserve a servile imitation of the proceedings of another country—not in the choice of a Regent, whicha iş a common concern, but in the particular provisions, and limitations, which are not a common concern, and which ought to be, “and must be, governed by the particular circumstances of the different countries. The bill, or instrument which he calls a bill, is suggested on an opinion that an Irish act of Parliament might pass with ont a King, in a situation to give the Royal assent, and without a Regent appointed by the Irish Houses of Parliament to supply his place. The idea of limitation, I conceive to be an attack on the necessary power of Government; the idea of his bill iş, an attack on the King of Ireland. We have heard the Castle, dissenting, as we must, from their suggestion. It remains for us to take the business, out of their hands, and confide the custody of this

documents, by which, when the House should be perfectly informed of the manner of proceeding in! England, they would be better able to form their determination, and to preserve entire the unity of the executive Government. -. * *. y dud

To this delay, Mr. Grattan, Mr. Ponsonby, and Mr, Connolly objected, as degrading to the Irish Parliament, and to the free constitution of their country.

; 'i ..! :IH 920you ou

4 .'1! !0;

8 9.1000 The Clerk having read the examination of the Physiciaps, relative to the state of the King's health

"Ili9103 . P. 1899702

Los "191911:3 Mr. GRATTAN rose, and spoke to the follow ing purport;

. .. 19 1024 plu3:22

. . 43 : 1 / 6 MR. SPEAKER, .. . Info T .6 The Right Honorable Secretary has stated the plan of the Castle, which it seems is limi: tation and a bill. He proposés to name, for the Regency of this realm, his Royal Highness the Prince of Wales ;-in this we are perfectly agreed ;-but I must in this add, that he only

follows othea most decided wishes of the people of Ireland. We are clear, we have been so from the first, that His - Royal Highness the Prince of Wales ought, and must be the · Regent gudo but we are also clear, that he should be in: vested with the full regal power-plenitude of royal power.

6 The limitations which the Member purposes to impose, are suggested with a view to preserve a servile imitation of the proceedings of another country—not in the choice of a Regent, which is a common concern, but in the particular provisions and limitations, which are not a common concern, and which ought to be, 'and must be, governed by the particular circumstances of the different countries. The bill, or instrument which he calls a bill, is suggested on an opinion that an Irish act of Parliament might pass with out a King, in a situation to give the Royal assent, and without a Regent appointed by the Irish Houses of Parliament to supply his place. The idea of limitation, I conceive to be an attack on the necessary power of Government; the idea of his bill is, an attack on the King of Ireland. We have heard the Castle dissenting, as we must, from their suggestion. It remains for us to take the business out of their hands, and confide the custody of this

great and important matter to men more constitutional and respectable. The Lords and Commons of Ireland, and not the Castle, should take the leading part in this great-duty. The country gen. tlemen, who procured the Constitution, -should nominate the Regent. I shall submit the proceed. ings we intend in the discharge of this great and necessary duty. * “ We propose to begin by a resolution declaring the incapacity of the King, for the present, to i dis. charge the personal functions of the regal power. It is a most melancholy truth, but a truth nota withstanding so fully proved and so generally admitted, that no man who does not proceed on the principle of affected stupidity, can entertain a doubt of it; the recovery of the Sove. reign, however the object of every man's wishes, is that uncertain event on which no m'an will presume to despair or to decide. Having then by the first resolution ascertained the deficiency in the personal exercise of the regal power, the next step which I shall submit is, the supply of that deficiency: This melancholy duty falls on the two Houses of the Irish Parliament ; whether you consider them as the only survive ing estates capable of doing an 'act, or as the highest formed description of his Majesty's peo ple of Ireland. The method whereby I propose

[graphic]

these great assemblies shall supply this deficiency is, by address. There are two ways of proceeding to these august bodies perfectly familiar; one is by way of legislation ; the other by way of address. When they proceed by way of legis, lation, it is on the supposition of a third in a capacity to act; but, address is a mode exclusively their own, and complete without the interfe, rence of a third estate ; : it is that known parliamentary method by which the two Houses exercise those powers to which they are jointly competent ;, therefore, I submit to you, that the mode by address, is the most proper for supply, ing the present deficiency; and though the ad, dress shall, on this occasion, have all the force and operation of law, yet still that force, and operation arise from the necessity of the case, and are confined to it. We, do not profess to legislate in the ordinary forms, as if legislation was your ordinary province; we propose to make an efficient third estate in order to legis. late, not to legislate in order to create the third estate, the deficiency: being the want of an effi. cient a third estate. The creation of such an estate is the only act that deficiency makes in dispensable ; so limiting your act, you part with your present extraordinary power the mo: ment you exercise it, and the very nature of

« PreviousContinue »