A Gazetteer of Massachusetts: Containing Descriptions of All the Counties, Towns and Districts in the Commonwealth; Also, of Its Principal Mountains, Rivers, Capes, Bays, Harbors, Islands, and Fashionable Resorts. To which are Added, Statistical Accounts of Its Agriculture, Commerce and Manufactures; with a Great Variety of Other Useful Information

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J. Hayward, 1846 - Electronic book - 444 pages

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Page 11 - God and one of another, covenant and combine ourselves together into a civil body politic, for our better ordering and preservation, and furtherance of the ends aforesaid ; and by virtue hereof to enact, constitute and frame such just and equal laws, ordinances, acts, constitutions, and offices, from time to time, as shall be thought most meet and convenient for the general good of the colony ; unto which we promise all due submission and obedience.
Page 129 - God wills us free ; — man wills us slaves. I will as God wills; God's will be done. Here lies the body of JOHN JACK, A native of Africa, who died March, 1773, aged about sixty years.
Page 257 - By shutting up the port of Boston, some imagine that the course of trade might be turned hither and to our benefit; but...
Page 205 - Producing change of beauty ever new. —Ah ! that such beauty, varying in the light Of living nature, cannot be portrayed By words, nor by the pencil's silent skill; But is the property of him alone Who hath beheld it, noted it with care, And in his mind recorded it with love!
Page 396 - Thou crownest the year with thy goodness ; and thy paths drop fatness. They drop upon the pastures of the wilderness : and the little hills rejoice on every side. The pastures are clothed with flocks ; the valleys also are covered over with corn ; they shout for joy, they also sing.
Page 246 - Sir, the circumstances of this audience are so extraordinary, the language you have now held is so extremely proper, and the feelings you have discovered so justly adapted to the occasion, that I must say that I not only receive with pleasure the assurance of the friendly dispositions of the United States, but that I am very glad the choice has fallen upon you to be their minister.
Page 247 - The king then asked me, whether I came last from France ? and upon my answering in the affirmative, he put on an air of familiarity ; and, smiling, or rather laughing, said, " There is an opinion among some people, that you are not the most attached of all your countrymen to the manners of France.
Page 246 - I have the honour to assure your majesty of their unanimous disposition and desire to cultivate the most friendly and liberal intercourse between your majesty's subjects and their citizens, and of their best wishes for your majesty's health and happiness and for that of your royal family.
Page 278 - They waste us — ay — like April snow In the warm noon, we shrink away ; And fast they follow, as we go • Towards the setting day, — Till they shall fill the land, and we Are driven into the western sea.
Page 247 - That opinion, sir, is not mistaken ; I must avow to your majesty I have no attachment but to my own country.

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