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III Scared at thy frown terrific, fly

The morals (antiquated brood) Domestic Virtue, Social Joy,

And faith that has for ages stood ; Swift they disperse, and with them go The Friend sincere, the gen'rous Foe.Traitors to God and Man avow'd, By thee, now raised aloft, now crush'd beneath the

crowd.

IV.
Revenge, in blood-stain'd robe array'd,

Immersed in gloomy joy profound;
Ingratitude, by guilt dismay'd,

With anxious eye wild glancing round, Still on thy frantic steps attend : With Death, thy Victim's only friend, Injustice to the truth severe, And Anguish, dropping still the life-consuming tear.

V.
Oh swiftly on my country's head,

Destroyer, lay thy ruthless hand,
Not yet in Gallic terrors clad,

Nor circled by the Marseilles Band, (As by the initiate thou art seen) With thund’ring cannon, Guillotine, With screaming horrors funeral cry, Fire, rapine, sword, and chains, and ghastly Poverty.

VI.
Thy sophist veil, dread Goddess, wear,

Falsehood insidiously impart;
Thy philosophic train be there,

To taint the mind, corrupt the heart; The gen'rous Virtues of our Isle, Teach us to hate and to revile ; Our glorious Charter's fault to scan, Time-sanction’d Truths despise, and preach The

Rights of Man.

AN ENGLISH JACOBIN.

No. XXI.

April 2. WB

B premised in our Sixteenth Number, that though we should not proceed regularly with the publication of the Didactic Poem, the PROGRESS OF Man,—a work which, indeed, both from its bulk, and the erudite nature of the subject, would hardly suit with the purposes of a Weekly Paper ;-we should, nevertheless, give, from time to time such Extracts from it, as we thought were likely to be useful to our Readers, and as were in any degree connected with the topics or events of the times.

The following Extract is from the 23d Canto of this admirable and instructive Poem;-in which the Author (whom, by a series of accidents, which we have neither the space, nor indeed the liberty, to enumerate at present, we have discovered to be Mr. Higgins, of St. Mary Axe) describes the vicious refinement of what is called Civilized Society, in respect to Marriage ; contends with infinite spirit and philosophy against the factitious sacredness and indissolubility of that institution; and paints in glowing colours the happiness and utility (in a moral as well as political view) of an arrangement of an opposite sort, such as prevails in

H

countries which are yet under the influence of pure and unsophisticated nature.

In illustration of his principles upon this subject, the Author alludes to a popular production of the German Drama, the title of which is the “ Reform'D HouseKEEPER,” which he expresses a hope of seeing transfused into the language of this country.

THE PROGRESS OF MAN,

CANTO TWENTY-THIRD.

CONTENTS.

ON MARRIAGE.

MARRIAGEbeing indissoluble,the cause of its being so often

unhappy.- Nature's Laws not consulted in this point.-Civilized Nations mistaken.-OTAHEITE.Happiness of the Natives thereof-Visited by Captain Cook, in his Majesty'sShip Endeavour-Character of Captain Cook. -Address to Circumnavigation.- Description of his Majesty's Ship Endeavour-Mast, Rigging, Sea-sickness, Prow,Poop,Mess-room, Surgeon's Mate-History of one.- Episode concerning Naval Chirurgery.Catching a Thunny Fish.- Arrival at Otaheite.-Cast Anchor-land-Natives astonished.-Love-Liberty -Moral--Natural--ReligiousContrasted with European Manners - Strictness -- Licence.- Doctor's Commons Dissolubility of MARRIAGE recommended -Illustrated by a Game at Cards-Whist-Cribbage -Partners changedWhy not the same in Marriage? Illustrated by a River.Lovefree.-Priests, Kings.German Drama.--KOTZEBUE'S Housekeeper Reformed.Moral Employments of Housekeeping described.-Hottentots sit and stare at each other-Query WHY ?-Address to the Hottentots.--History of the Cape of Good Hope. - Resumé of the Arguments against Marriage.-Conclusion.

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