Page images
PDF
EPUB

1

The shop-keeping hoard,
The tenant and Lord,

And the merchants, * are excellent prey:
At our cannon's first thunder,
Rape, pill age, and plunder

The Order shall be of the day.

French fortunes and lives,
French daughters and wives,

Have five honest men to defend 'em,
And Barras and Co.
When to England we go,

Will kindly take John's in commendam.

* AtLyons, Jabogues, the second murderer (the actor being the first), in his speech to the Democratic Society, used these words—« Down with the edifices raised for the profit or the “pleasure of the rich ; down with them all. COMMERCE " and Arts are useless to a warlike people, and are the de“ struction of that subLIME EQUALITY which France is deter“ mined to spread over the globe.”

Such are the consequences of RADICAL REFORM!!! Let any merchant, farmer, or landlord : let any husband or father consider this, and then say,

Shall we or shall we not contribute a moderate sum, IN PROPORTION TO OUR ANNUAL EXPEN“ DITURE, for the purpose of preserving ourselves from the fate

of Lyons, La Vendé, and Nantz.”

66

STYPTIC.

No. XI.

Jan. 22. We have said in another part of our Paper of this day, that though we shall never begin an attack, we shall

always be prompt to repel it.On this principle, we could not pass over in silence, the

Epistle to the Editors of the Anti-Jacobin, which appeared in the Morning Chronicle of Wednesday, and from which we have fortunately been furnished with

a Motto for this day's Paper. We assure the Author of the Epistle, that the Answer

which we have here the honour to address to him, contains our genuine and undisguised sentiments upon

the merits of the Poem. Our conjectures respecting the authors and abettors of

this performance may possibly be as vague and unfounded as theirs are with regard to the Editors of the Anti-Jacobin. We are sorry that we cannot satisfy their curiosity upon this subjectbut we have little anxiety for the gratification of our own.

TO THE AUTHOR OF THE EPISTLE TO THE EDITORS OF THE

ANTI-JACOBIN.*
Nostrorum sermonun candide judex !
Bard of the borrow'd lyre! to whom belong
The shreds and remnants of each hackney'd song ;

* It is hardly to be expected, that the character of the Epistle should be taken on trust from the Editors of this Volume : it thought best, therefore, to subjoin the whole performance as it originally appeared : a mode of hostility obviously the most fair, and in respect to the combatants in the cause of Jacobinism, by much the most effectual. They are always best opposed by the arms which they themselves furnish. Jacobinism shines by its own light.

To the respectable names which the author of the following Address has thought proper to connect with the “ ANTIJACOBIN,” no apology is made for thus preserving this other. wise perishable specimen of dullness and defamation. He who has been reviled by the enemies of the “ Anti-Jaco“ Bin,” must feel that principles are attributed to him, of which he need not be ashamed : and when the abuse is conveyed in such a strain of feebleness and folly, he must see that those principles excite animosity only in quarters of which he need not be afraid.

It is only necessary to add, what is most conscientiously the truth, that this production, such as it is, is by far the best of all the attacks that the combined wits of the cause have been able to muster against the “ Anti-Jacobin.”

EPISTLE

TO THE
EDITORS OF THE ANTI-JACOBIN.

Hic Niger est ; hunc tu, Romane, caveto.
To tell what gen’rals did, or statesmen spoke,
To teach the world by truths, or please by joke ;

Whose verse thy friends in vain for wit explore,
And count but one good line in eighty-four !
To make mankind grow bold as they peruse,
Judge on existing things, and-weigh the news;
For this a PAPER first display'd its page,
Commanding tears and smiles through ev'ry age!

Hail, justly famous! who in modern days
With nobler flight aspire to higher praise ;
Hail, justly famous ! whose discerning eyes
At once detect MISTAKES, MIS-STATEMENTS, LIES;
Hail, justly famous ! who, with fancy blest,
Use fiend-like virulence for sportive jest ;
Who only bark to serve your private ends-
Patrons of Prejudice, Corruption's friends!
Who hurl your venom'd darts at well-earn'd fame-
Virtue your hate, and Calumny your aim!
Who'er ye are, all hail !-whether the skill
Of youthful C–nn-g guides the ranc'rous quill,
With powers mechanic far above his age
Adapts the paragraph and fills the page,
Measures the column, mends whate'er's amiss,
Rejects that letter, and accepts of THIS;
Or H-mm-d, leaving his official toil,
O'er this great work consume the midnight oil
Bills, passports, letters, for the Muses quit,
And change dull business for amusing wit :
His life of labour at one gasp is o'er,
His books forgot-his desk belov'd no more !
Proceed to prop the Ministerial cause ;
See consequential M-p-th nods applause ;
In ev'ry fair one's ear at balls and plays
The gentle Gr-nv-le L-v-mn whispers praise :-
Well-judging Patrons, whom such works can please ;
Great works, well worthy Patrons such as these !
Who heard not raptur'd, the poetic Sage
Who sung of Gallia in a beadlong rage,

Whoe'er thou art, all hail ! thy bitter smile
Gilds our dull

page,

and cheers our humble toil!

And blandly drew with no uncourtly grace
The simple manners of our English race-
Extolld great Duncan, and supremely brave,
Whelm’d Buonaparte's pride beneath the wave?
I swear by all the youth's that M-Im-sbmry chose,
By Ells' sapient prominence of nose,
By M-rp-th's gait important, proud, and big-
By L-s-nG --w'r's crop-imitating wig,
That could the pow'rs which in those numbers shine,
Could that warm spirit animate my line,
Your glorious deeds, which humbly I rehearse
Your deeds should live immortal as my verse;
And, while they wonder'd whence I caught my flame,
Your sons should blush to read their father's shame!

Proceed, great men !- your office is not done;
Proceed with what you have so well begun:
Load Fox (if you by Pitt would be preferrd)
With ev'ry guilt that Kenyon ever heard-
Adult'rer, gamester, drunkard, cheat, and knave,
A factious demagogue, and pension'd slave!
Loose, loose your cry, with ire satiric flash;
Let all the Opposition feel your lash,
And prove them to these hot and partial times
A combination of the worst of crimes !

But softer numbers softer subjects fit:
In liquid phrases thrill the praise of Pitt:
Extol in eulogies of candid truth
The Virgin Minister-the Heav'n-born Youth;
The greatest gift that fate to England gave,
Created to support and born to save ;
Prompt to supply whate'er his country lacks-
Skillful to GAG, and knowing how to TAX!
With him companions meet in order stand-
A firm, compact, and well-appointed band.

E

« PreviousContinue »