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Medicine, with many rare treatises on Botany, and other Baker

1 branches of Natural History. Students have the privi. Gardener and assistant

2 lege of usinz this splendid collection, while attending Keeper of West's painting. (a female,) 1 the Hospital practice; and a right to its use during life is Watchman

1 granted for the sum of twenty-five dollars. This library Ostler

1 fund amounts annually to 3 or 400 dollars; last year $576 Cow-keeper

1 62, were paid for books and binding. The Clerk is also Washer-women

2 Librarian.

Cooks.

2 The six physicians and surgeons having charge of the House-maids

3 medical and surgical departments, divide the year into Nurses in the women's wards three equal periods, one physician and one surgeon at

in the men's wards, two males and tending at the same time, and continuing in charge of

six females

8 their respective wards four months. The two physi. Female attendants on the Insane

8 cians having charge of the lying-in department, conti- Male attendants on the Insane nue in office six months each. In extraordinary cases, and before the performance of surgical operations, it is

44 usual for the gentleman in attendance to hold consulta- 17 men, and 27 women. —And 2 private servants of the tion with his colleagues.

Insane, whose board and wages are paid by the parties A physician to the Hospital must be 27 years of age The salaries and wages amount to about $5600 per before he can be elected.

annum. An extensive Anatomical Museum formerly belong

Mode of OBTAINING ADMISSION. ed to the Hospital, which was a few years since present- The usual mode of obtaining admission into the Hos ed to the Medical department of the University. pital is, by first applying to one of the physicians in at

The following is a list of the Physicians and Surgeons tendance; who, after examining the patient, gives a cerfrom the commencement of the institution.

tificate of the nature of the disease, and the propriety of Elected. Res'gd. Duration. its admission into the Hospital; this is addressed to the Lloyd Zachary

1751 1753 2 years. attending managers, who settle the terms of admission, Thomas Bond

1784 33 and grant their order, directing the Steward of the HosPhineas Bond

1774 23 pital to receive the patient. This course is only deThomas Grame

1753 2 parted from in two cases—that of seamen, who, by a Thomas Cadwallader

1777 26 special agreement, after receiving a certificate from the Saml. Preston Moore

1759

physician, have only to obtain the order of the Collector John Redman

1780 29 of the Port-and in cases of accident, it being a rule to Wm. Shippen

1753. 1778 25 receive, by day or night, every person who meets with Cadwallader Evans

1759 1774 15 an accident requiring surgical aid, without requiring any John Morgan

1774 1777 3 security of the parties who bring the patient to the Hos Charles Moore

1774 1775 1 pital;—provided the accident occurs in Pennsylvania, Adam Kuhn

1775 1781 6 and the sufferer is brought immediately or within twenWm. Shippen Jr.

1778 1779 1 ty-four hours. Thomas Parke

1777 1823

45 up'd. Overseers of the poor from the country, who bring a James Hutchinson 1777 1778 1 patient, must have a certificate signed by two magisJohn Morgan

1778 1783 5 trates, denoting that they are in office, and the pauper Gerardus Clarkson

1779 1779 1 proposed for admission resides in their district, or their Adam Kuhn

1782 1798 16 application will be rejected. John Jones 1781 1792 11

Persons with infectious diseases are not to be re-ceived. Wm. Shippen, Jr. 1792 1802 10

PATIENTS. Benjamin Rush 1784 1813 29

The charter of this institution provides, that no part John Foulke

1784 1793 9 of its income shæl be appropriated to any other purpose, James Hutchinson

1780 1793 13 than to the support of the sick and diseased poor, and Caspar Wistar

1794 1810 16 providing the necessary buildings for their accommodaPhilip Syng Physick 1794 1816 22 tion; and that those whose diseases render them proper Benjamin S. Barton 1798 1816 17 objects of the charity, shall be received from any part John R. Coxe

1802 1807 5 of Pennsylvania, without partiality or preference. Thomas C. James 1807

After the accommodation of as many poor patients as John Syng Dorsey 1810 1818 8 the state of their funds will justify, the Managers have Joseph Harthorne

1811 1821 10 authority to receive pay patients; any profit derived John C. Olto 1814

from this source being devoted to increase the fund for Joseph Parrish 1816

the maintenance of the poor. The rates usually charged Thomas T. Hewson 1818

are from three to six dollars per week, according to the Saml. Calhoun

1816 1821 5 circumstances of the patient. The amount received last William Price

1821 1823 2 year for the board of patients was $21,328 62. Pay paJohn Moore 1820

tients are not admitted on a deposit of money, or on the John Wilson Moore 1821 1827 6 responsibility of strangers, the only security accepted, Samuel Emlen 1823 1828

is that of some respectable resident in Philadelphia. At John Rhea Barton 1823

their own desire, patients may be attended, excluJohn K. Mitchell 1827

sively, by either of the Hospital physicians they prefer, Benjamin H. Coates 1828

but in such cases it is expected that the affluent will pay Resident Physicians at this time-James A. Washing- the physicians as though attended elsewhere. ton, and George Fox.

The overseers of the poor of Pennnsylvania, and reApothecary–Newberry Smith, Jr.

ligious societies therein, who support the poor by their PERSOXS EMPLOYED ABOUT THE HOUSE.

own voluntary subscriptions, pay but three dollars a The officers and servants residing in this institution, week, which is about the first cost of one person's mainand receiving pay are,

tenance, including medicines and all charges, except Steward and Matron

2 clothing and funeral expenses. Matron of the Insane

1 As this institution is intended to be a hospital for the Clerk and Librarian

1 cure of disease, not a permanent asylum for poverty and Apothecary

1 decrepitude, the Managers can admit none on the chaGate-keeper

1 rity list, whose diseases are chronic and incurable, era

1

28 27 32 72 63 78 67 103 89 71 661

96

cept those affiicted with insanity; and it is imperative upon them to discharge all patients, who after a reason. able time of trial, may be deemed incurable.

The number at present received at one time on the charity, is one hundred, of whom thirty-three may be insane. It has been found necessary to limit the proportion of insane poor, on account of the length of time they frequently remain in the house.

The whole number of patients admitted into the Hospital, from its opening, l'ebruary 11, 1752, to April 26, 1828, was twenty-five thousand and seventy, of whom 12,752 were poor, and 12,318 pay patients. Of these have been dischargedCured

15,579 Relieved

3,027 Incurable

150 Removed by friends, or at their re. quest

1,460 Eloped and discharged for misconduct, 948 Pregnant women delivered safely

468 Infants taken out in health

437 Died

2,792

24,861 Remaining in the Hospital April 26, 1828

209

Admitted in 1789

1790 1791 1792 1793 1794 1795 1796) 1797 1798 1799 1800 1801 1802 1803 1804 1805 1806 1807 1808 18091 1810 1811 1812 1813 1814 1815 1816 1817 1818 1819 1820 1821 1822 18231 1824 1825 1826 1827 1828

49 51 73 107

87 170 107 113 114 101 60 80 106 176 217 214 231 241 338 288 419 216 281 373 376 307 235 500 483 468 474 457 414 300 346 363 353 368 416 427

701 731 87 881 89

98 115 121 141 152 171 172 145 140 159 181 201 170 243 292

771 47 781 46 105 52 179 64 150 63 248 71 174 72 216 69 20375 172 78 126 74 176 78 176 85 249 87 304 114 302) 113 320 103 339) 109 453) 129 409 122 5601 158 3681 127 452 138 545 150 521) 161 447| 163 394 147 681| 178 684200 638 199 717| 214 749 226 700 208 544 158 688 170 747 178 744 177 730 175 809) 183 887| 202

25,070

The following list shows the number of poor and pay patients that have been admitted from the commencement of the hospital to the present time, as also the average number in the house:

286

house.
No. in the
Average

244 342 384 391 362 383 460

Admitted from Fe.

bruary 11, 1752,
to April, 1753

1754
1755
1756
1757
1758
1759
1760
1761
1762
1763
1764
1765
1766
1767
1768
1769
1770
1771
1772
1773)
1774
1775
1776
1777
1778
17791
1780
1781
1782
1783
1784
1785
1786
1787
1788

24 14 13

71 13 29 25 32 40 29 46 50 45 56 38 54 321 49 44 44 46 63 60 42 109 31 16 10

Canada ....

40 39 60 61 68 85 102 105 113 128 194 272 261 283 307 337 353 336 338 349 315 374 361 393 268

96 107 118 103 42 23 47 35 25 30

64 53 73 68 81 114 127 137 153 157 240 322 306 339 345 391 385 385 382 393 361 437 421 435 377 127 123 128 121 111 106 203 168 138 138 110)

9

12,318/12,752 25,070
12
17 Of 1859 patients in the Hospital in 1826 & 1827, there
17

were from
17
United States...

.1232
33
Ireland...

...407
34
England and Wales.

...88
40
Scotland ....

.....14
45
Germany..

......36
47
Sweden...

..23
73
France..

.21
101
West Indies..

.7
111
Denmark

7
119
Portugal.

.4
120
123
Italy....

.3
110
Africa.

.2
113

Spain. 118

Prussia.
117
China.

.
105
Corsica.

.1
117
Holland

.1
105

Norway.
89
Russia

2
67
39

1859
36

Foreigners 627 35

United States 1232 35 36

DISEASES OF THE PATIENTS. 37 The following table shows the number of cases of each 61

disease which have occurred from the establishment of 51 the hospital to the present time: 51 Abscess 111 Anasarca

38 54 Ague 37 Anchylosis

6 54 | Amenorrhæa 13 Anourism

13

18

69 83 156 133 113 108

78'

321

39

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.

Anus imperforate 2 Hydrothorax

14

CASES OF INSANITY. Apoplexia 8 Hydrophobia

1 Asthma

72 Hypochondriasis Burns and Scalds 146 Hysterics

38

Total Cancer 72 Jaundice

26 Caries 140 Insanity

3245 Cataract

79 Delirium Tremens or Catarrhus

2418

452 444 188 364 184 insanity caused by 242 Males,

601 37 intemperance

Females 1069 344 250 224 Cephalalgia

42 162 47 Cholera 14 Inflammations

298 Cholic 55 Leprosy

14 Chorea St. Viti 8 Measles

2

3487 1254 702 668 230 526 107 Constipation 9 Nephritis

10

It should be remarked, that a large proportion of the Contusions & wounds 1692 Obstructed viscera 122 deaths have been from old age, or diseases haying.no Convulsions

601

menses 77 Cramp 12 Ophthalmia

necessary connexion with insanity. A large proportion

216 of the elopements occurred before the wall was erected. Croup

2 Palsy

205 Cynanche Tonsilaris 24 of bladder

4

The LYING-IN DEPARTMENT. Deafness 16 Paraphymosis

3 A part of the third story is appropriated to this use. Debility 59 Paronychia

21 Ordinarily there are in it 50 per anm. During the last Diabetes 4 Pectoral and pulmo

year 28-children were born in the house. None but Diarrhæa

293 nary affections 285 married women, of respectable character, are admitted Diseased Bladder 24 Pneumonia

87 here; other classes being referred to the alms-house. Glands 4 Peripneumony

4 This ward is an extremely neat and beautiful set of rooms, Rectum 3 Pleurisy

222 with a fine exposure; and is a situation much sought afSpine

22 Phthsis Pulmonalis 314 ter by women of that description when in difficult cir. Spleen 3 Poisoned

11 cumstances. It owes its origin to a donation from the Testicles 32 Polypus

10 First Troop of Philadelphia City Cavalry. The history Uterus 10 Prolapsus Ani

7 of this donation is highly curious, and honorable to the Joints 314

Uteri 12 donors. After the termination of the war of the revo Heart

1 Pregnancy (cases of) 529 lution, in which this body acted, as is well known, as a Ears

9 Infants born in hospital 477 life-guard to Washington, and after many delays, they Eyes

238 Rheumatism 1962 received a sum of money as the amount of their pay Gutta Serena 48 Nervous affections 23 from the government for military services; this they first Dislocations 102 Scrophula

89 resolved to appropriate to the establishment of a found. Dropsy 558 Scurvy

212 ling hospital. After some time, it was proposed to deDysentery

440 Stone in the bladder 61 posit it in the charge of the managers of the Pennsyl. Dyspepsia 56 Strictures

79 vania Hospital for the same use. This body were, how. Dysury 12 Sprains

64 ever, disinclined to such a foundation, in consequence Epilepsy 109 Spasms

2 of the distressing accounts which were then transmitted Eruptions 143 Strangury

8 from Europe, of the mortality which took place in such Erysipelas 24 Syncope

4 institutions there. A law had been obtained authorising Exostosis 5 Small pox

38 the managers to institute a "Lying-in and Foundling Febris 1821 Surfeit

5 Hospital,but after several conferences between them Biliosa 26 Sore throat

8 and the representatives of the First Troop, it was finally Intermittens 781 Splenitis

4 concluded to omit the foundling establishment, and the Remittens 233 Tetanus

14 lying-in rooms were opened as at present.
Flava
10 Tinea Capitis

18 Physicians Thomas C. James, and John Moore. Fistula 138 Tumors

304

(To be Concluded.) Fluor Albus

6 Ulcers

2402 Frosted 161 Urine, suppression of 8

THE LEIPER CANAL Fractures

Incontinence of 3 The late Thomas Leiper, Esq. of this city, contem Gangrene 32 Vertigo

36 plated, in 1790, a canal along his estate in Delaware Gunshot wounds 56 White swellings 37 county, in order to complete an easy communication Hair lip 6 Worms

1 between his quarries on Crum creek, and the DelaHemorrhage 11 Wounded soldiers and ware.

comprehended by Hemoptysis & Hemoptoe 71| sailors Hemorrhoids

52 Wounded Hessians 26 in his attempt. In 1807 he caused a rail road--the first Hepatitis

66 Sick continental soldiers 104 in this country-to be constructed from his quarties to Hernia

102 wives of do 7 Ridley creek. In 1825, since the death of Mr. Leiper, Humoralis

8 children of do 4 his son Geo. G. Leiper, Esq. revived the idea proposed Hydrocele 43

by his father-and on Saturday the 16th inst. the corVaricose veins

17

25070 ner stone of the canal was laid, by Wm. Strickland, Esq. Venereal disease 29781

with an appropriate address from Professor Patterson, of CASES OF INSANITY.

this city. A large concourse of citizens, as we gather Of these there have been in the above mentioned pe, whom was Mrs. Elizabeth C. Leiper, the aged widow of

from the Upland Union, attended the ceremony, among riod, 3487. Of which about 240 are designated as caused the gentleman who had proposed the canal.-U. S. Gez. by intemperance. The number of insane patients in the house is gene

Printed every Saturday morning by William F. Gedrally about 110.

des, No. 59 Locust street, Philadelphia; where, and at Cases of Insanity, from Februury 11, 1752, to April the Editor's residence, No. 51 Filbert street, subscrip26, 1828.

tions will be thankfully received. Price five dollars per The following table, the result of a very careful ex. annum--payable in six months after the commencement amination of the Hospital records, exhibits the number of publication—and annually, thereafter, by subscribers of insane patients of each scx, together with the propor- resident in or near the city-or where there is an agent. tion cured, relieved, &c.

Other subscribers pay in advance.

991

}38 the legislature at that time, and he found himself foiled

DEVOTED TO THE PRESERVATION OF EVERY KIND OF USEFUL INFORMATION RESPECTING THE STATE.

EDITED BY SAMUEL HAZARD, NO. 51, FILBERT STREET.

VOL. II.-NO. 7.

PHILADELPHIA, AUGUST 30, 1828.

NO. 35.

PENNSYLVANIA HOSPITAL-COXCLUDED. Out-patients attended and supplied with medicine from the
Lying-IN DEPARTMENT.

Dispensary of the Pennsylvania Hospital, whose cases

were not proper to be admitted into the said Hospital on -1 Statement of all the Cases admitted into the Lying-in account of infectious diseases and for other reasons, from

Department of the Pennsylvania Hospital, from its es- April 4, 1797 10 tablishment in 1803, to April 26th, 1828.

Cured. Died.
1798 220 167

19
1799
302 224

17
1800 256 185

9 Date

1801 188

120

3
1802 162 158
1803

41

28

1804 315 266 1803 2 11

1

1805 234 180 1804 3 1

1 1

1806 753 636 24 1805

7 6

1
1807 800 697

21 1806 3

3 2
1808 830 690

19 1807 5

1 5 5

1809 1233 1031 37 1808 5 4

41 2

2
1810 1216 1088

66 1809

5
1811 1616 1255

81 1810

1
1812 1366 1013

44
1811
1

1813 1064 849 61 1812 8 7

8 7

1

1814 1232 998 114 1813 4 4

5l 4 1

1815 1132 891 138 1814 7 6

5

3

1816 1194 895 116 1815 17 17

17) 13 1 3
1817 1909 1669

63 1816 14 10 | 1

1 3 14| 11

2 1817 17 10 2 11 11

16,063 13,040 847 1818 18 171

13 11

2 The residue were convalescent-eloped, removed of 1819 26 24 1

22 19

continued under care at its close. 1820 50 46

2
50 44
4

TREATMENT OF PATIENTS. 1821 48 42

4 44 43

2

The improvements in the condition of the deranged 1822 33 32

1 31] 32

1 are among the most interesting crcumstances: 1823 48 38 3 1

5 42 39

1 The greater part of the patients sleep in separate 1824 43 33 6

35 32

1 cells many of the men, however, pass the night in 1825 41 43 3

37 41

large rooms, in company with each other, and with at1826 30 27 2 1

27/ 25

1 tendants. At an early hour, they are taken to a com1827 38 35

1 37) 32

mon breakfast, and they then repair, if the weather bo 1828 48 42 4 1

42 39

4 suitable, to their court-yard, if otherwise, to the day.

room, where they continue, with the exception of meals, Total. | 529 468 26 6 3 20|| 477437 2 35 till sun set, when they are reconducted to their sleep

ing rooms. The sexes, throughout the whole day, are Remaining in the Hospital April 26th, 1828.

kept separate. We here speak only of the ordinary Women 6 Children 3.

patients. Some are permitted the liberty of the whole of the above women 5 had twins-4 wete discharged portion of the house, devoted to patients of this class tvith their children in health, but in the other instance and of a separate yard, denominated the convalescent both the children died.-C. M. was delivered on the 10th yard--a small number of others, being selected from of April 1819 of 3 children, 2 of whom were still born among those who are supposed the most to regard and and the other died shortly afterwards--the same woman be bencfitted by such an indulgence, have a separate was again admitted in the early part of the year 1821 table, at which the female superintendant of this departand was delivered of one child, which was discharged ment prseides. This is found to be both highly gratiin health.-It is impossible to ascertain the exact nuin fying to their feelings, and beneficial in redacing their ber of still-born children, as these cases have not been minds to a more tranquil state. recorded (except occassionally,) I have only found no

Much pains have been taken at different times, to tices of 11.

W. G. M.

obtain suitable and sufficient employment for the pa. Our PATIENTS.

tients of this description—but the situation of the bos

pital prevents this being done to the same extent that it We have said on page 91 that out patients were sup might if the establishment were in the country. Con plied with medicines and attended by the Hospital phy. veniences in this respect are among the most important sicians gratuitously. This continued to be the case un advantages of a country situation. Some of the men til May 1817, when the practice was discontinued in con- are employed, however, about the business of the house, sequence of the establishment of the northern and thus all the ordinary carpenter's work which is no incon. southern dispensaries. The following table shows the siderable amount, was, till lately performed by a patient. number of patients attended from 1798 to that period. It is in the feinale department, however, that this design is The accounts kept of them previously are irregular most completely fulfilled, nearly all who are capable of Vol. II.

14

1

it being employed, during a portion of the day, atence for support has ever been upon the generous beneedle-work.

nevolence of private citizens. The use of metallic chains is forbidden-the substi- The only fixed revenue of the institution is the intertute for them, employed when necessary, being compo- est of the capital stock loaned to various individuals on sed of links of strong bend-leather, with Sellers and bonds and mortgages, and invested in ground renta. Pennock's patent hose rivets, an extremely well con- This amounts to about ten thousand dollars per annum. trived apparatus—the large strait-jacket is almost uni. The following statement derived from the published acversally replaced by several ingenious substitutes-and

counts for 1827, will exbibit the different sources of visiters are excluded, except those of a suitable class,

its receipts; although from various circumstances these and these accompanied by proper conductors.

must differ every year: Personal confinement, in the Pennsylvania Hospital, Balance on hand 1826,

222,17 when necessary, is generally by means of straps, buck. Board of pay patients, 21,328,62 ling over the arms, of sleeves inclosing the whole hand, Clothing,

1750,46 and loosely fastened at the end to a waistband, so as in Funeral expenses,

158,05 both instances to admit of as great freedom of motion Articles destroyed,

66,88 as possible; and of the improved leather chains, men; Servants wages repaid,

222,00 tioned above. The comfort of the individual confired Sundries

39,85 is greatly increased by these simple contrivances, espe.

23,565,86 cially by the last, which prevents the distressing sound Articles sold and live stock,

655,42 of iron chains. The only punishment, es sufo require Medical fund studenticaiekets and } 442,00 confinement by chains, or on whom clothes cannot be Life right to library and fines, 27,75 kept, is extremely small indeed; frequently only one or

469,75 two being in the former, and none in the latter predica- West's painting visitors 822, pamphlets 31,96, 853,96 ment.

From the gate 474,75, manager's fines 10 484,75 A carriage and pair of horses are kept for the use of Donations $15, Contributions 240,

255,00 the patients; money for their purchase and support hav: A Legacy,

100,00 ing been bequeathed by Dr. Samuel Cooper, formerly Rent and ground rents,

1,219,70 a resident physician in the Hospital. Another horse is

Interest,

7630,52 kept for the marketing and other necessary uses of the Dividends on stock,

417,75 establishment; and twelve cows for a supply of milk to Sale of real estate,

4769,25 the patients: these derive the principal part of their A sum to be returned if called for

865,06 support from the adjacent lots, the property of the in-. Principal of bonds paid in,

2000,00 stitution. The provisions furnished to the inmates of the Hospi

$43,509,09 tal are of the best quality; the common diet is plain but nutritious, and in necessary cases, delicacies and wines

By some it may be supposed that the Pennsylvania are freely administered, on their prescription by the Hospital is sufficiently wealthy; but these should reflect physicians. It being a recognized maxim that, while that the buildings would yet accommodate many poor nothing may be administered merely to pamper the ap- patients and that this is their primary destination-add petite, nothing shall be spared which can contribute to to this that the managers of the institution have long bad the recovery of health.

in view, the necessity of providing funds for the erecEvery patient on the first and the upper floor has a tion of a separate asylum for the insane. drawer, in a bureau, for his clothes, the use of a rug by While this important object remains unaccomplished, the bed side, and a comfortable bed and bedding. Cur it is hoped that the wealthy and charitable will not, in tains are not employed, from a fear of their impeding the disposition of their estates, pass by the Pennsylvathe circulation of air and harbouring dirt and insects. — nia Hospital; or, considering it as already independent, The custom of the country being also against it, it is a leave it but a testimonial of their respect. The want of luxury which few or none of the patients have ever pre- an asylum for the insane, founded upon a liberal seale, viously possessed in the course of their lives. The with the advantage of the increased light which modern foors of these rooms, as of the whole house, are cover- science has shed on the history of the human intellect, ed with white sand; and when this is done, as is often is more urgent than any one who has not deeply investithe case, in ornamental figures, it produces a peculiarly gated the subject, can imagine. And those who shall neat effect. Machine beds, with improvements, have lay its foundation under the benign auspices of the charbeen, for many years, in constant employment for all ter of this noble charity, will rank deservedly high, not the patients with fractures of lower extremities, some- merely among the contributors to the Pennsylvania Hostimes to the number of five or six at a time. There are pital, but on the roll of distinguished benefactors to their also other conveniences for the patients, on which we countrymen and species. shall not enlarge. • An amputation of a limb is not to be performed, un- corporate name, viz. to *c The Contributors to the Penn

It is necessary that legacies should be given in the less the patient consents to it; nor then, unless the phy- sylvania Hospital.". sicians agree to it, after a consultation on the case. Contributions and donations are received by Samuel

The sick, especially the stranger, finds it his interest N. Lewis, Treasurer, No. 135 south Front street. to prefer the hospital to any tavern, or boarding-house,

EXPENDITURES. for many reasons: First, because the physicians are of the most eminent. however, a considerable outlay on behalf of patients

The total expenditure of the establishment, including, Secondly, the nurses, are the most experienced. Thirdly, the apartments are the most convenient.

(for clothing, &c.) which is repaid by their friends, Fourthly, the price of board is lower than any indi- amounts to about twenty-seven thousand dollars per anvidual can take; and

Lastly, the patient has the satisfaction to know, if there The following sums were paid out last year per the is any profit it is given to the poor.

published accounts:
RECEIPT.
Medical department, medicines, &c.

1321,86 Household expenses-provisions,

8011,61 Although this institution has received considerable aid Bedding, clothing, furniture, fuel, &c. 6678, 25 towards the erection of its buildings, from the legisla. For live stock, &c.

1542,10 ture of the state of Pennsylvania, its principal depe d. Repairs and improvements, &c.

2800,18

num.

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