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IX.

BOOK the burn on the great willow; from the great willow along

the lake on the pool above Crocford; from the head of this pool right to the elder; from the elder right on the military street; along the street to Curten-staple; from Curten-staple along the street to the hoar-thorn; from the thorn to the oak tree; from the oak tree to the three hills ; from the three hills to the Sihtran ; from the sithren to the limitary brook; from the limitary brook to Exlæpesburn; from Exlæpesburn to the hoar maple; from the hoar maple to the three trees; from the three trees along the deep brook right to the Wallgate; from the Wallgate to the clear pool; from the clear pool to the foul brook ; from the foul brook to the black willow; from the black willow right to the Wallgate, and along the Thames to the other part of Mixten-ham in the water between the hill island and Mixten-bam, and along the water to Nettle-island; from that island and along the Thames about Oxlake to Bere-hill, and so forth along the Thames to Hamen-island; and so along the middle of the stream to the mouth of the Way.

In 743 these boundaries occur : “ First from Turcan Spring's head and along the street on Cynelms-stone on the mill-way, then and along the ridge on Hart-ford ; thence and along the streams on the city ford on the fosse on the speaking place; thence on Turcan-valley on the seven springs, midward of the springs to Bale’s-hill, south, then on the chalkwall; thence again on Turcan-valley, and along again on the Turcan Spring's lead.”s

“ First from Thames mouth and along the Thames in Wynnabæce's mouth; from Wynnabæce to Woodymoor ; from Woodymoor to the wet ditch ; from the wet ditch to the beach, and from the beach to the old dike; from the old dike to the sedge-moor; from the scdge-moor to the head of the pool, and along to Thorn-bridge; from Thorn-bridge to Kadera-pool; from Kadera-pool to Beka-bridge; from

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IV.

Beka-bridge to the forepart of the Hipes-moor'; from that CHAP. moor within Coforth-brook ; from the brook within the hedge; after the hedge to the hillock called Kett; from Kett to the barrows; from the barrows to Lawern ; from Lawern into the ditch; and after the ditch to the Ship-oak; and from the Ship-oak to the great aspen, and so in to the reedy slough ; from the slough within the barrows; from the barrows to the way of the five oaks, and after that way within the five oaks; from the oaks to the three boundaries; from the three boundaries to the bourn of the lake; from that bourn to the milestone; from that stone to the hoar apple-tree; from that apple-tree within Doferie; after Doferie to Severn, and along the Severn to the Thames mouth.

In one of the boundaries a wolf-pit occurs.'

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CII A P. V.

Some Particulars of the Names of Places in Middlesex

and London, in the Saxon Times. BOOK IT appears from Domesday-book that in the Saxon times,

the county of Middlesex had been divided into hundreds, which were distinguished by the names that they now bear, with small variations of pronunciation or orthography.

Domesday Names for the
Hundreds of Middlesex.

Modern Names.
Osuluestone,

Ossulston.
Gara,

Gore.
Helethorne,

Elthorne.
Spelethorne,

Spelthorne.
Adelmetone,

Edmonton.
Honeslaw,

Hounslow.
Among the places mentioned in the county in Domesday-
book, we may easily discern the following ancient and modern
names to correspond:
Holeburne,

Holborn.
Stibenhede,

Stepney.
Fuleham,

Fulham.
Tueverde,

Twyford.
Wellesdone,

Wilsdon.
Totehele,

Tothil.
Scepertone,

Shepperton.
Hochestone,

Hoxton.
Neutone,

Newington.
Pancrass,

Pancrass.
Draitone,

Drayton.
Hamestede,

Hamstead.
Stanes,

Staines.
Sunneberie.

Sunbury.

Greneforde,
Greenford.

C H A P.

V.
Hanewelle,

Hanwell.
Covelie,

Cowley.
Handone,

Hendon.
Hermodeswarde,

Harmondsworth.
Tiburne,

Tyburn.
Haneworde,

Hanworth.
Hardintone,

Harlington.
Hillendone,

Hillingdon.
Ticheham,

Twickenham.
Leleham,

Laleham.
Exeforde,

Uxbridge.
Bedefunt,

Bedfont.
Felteham,

Feltham.
Stanmere,

Stanmore.
Northala,

Northall.
Adelmetone,

Edmonton.
Eneffelde,

Enfield.
Rislepe,

Ruislip.
Chingesberie,

Kingsbury.
Stanwelle,

Stanwell.
Hamntone,

Hampton.
Hergotestane,

Hestone.
Cranforde,

Cranford,
Chelched,

Chelsea,
Chenesita,

Kensington.
Iseldone,

Islington.
Toteham,

Tottenham,
Hesa,

Hayes.
The local denominations by which the various places in
England are now known, seem to have been principally
imposed by our Anglo-Saxon ancestors. Most of them, in
their composition, betray their Saxon origin ; and whoever
will take the trouble to compare the names in Domesday-
book, which prevailed in the island during the time of the

IX.

BOOK Confessor, with the present appellations of the same places,

will find that the greatest number of them correspond. The hundreds in the county of Sussex were sixty-three, and still remain so ; of these, thirty-eight bore the same names as now: and of the villæ or maneria, which are about three hundred and forty-five, there are two hundred and thirty with appellations like their present.

The following list will shew the correspondencies, between
the ancient and modern names of the counties, which occur
in Domesday-book :
Chenth.

Midelsexe.
Sudsexe.

Hertfordscire.
Sudrie.

Bockinghamscire.
Hantescire.

Oxenefordscire.
Berrochescire,

Glowecesterscire.
or

Wirecesterscire.
Berchescire.

Herefordscire.
Wiltescire.

Grentebrigescire.
Dorsete.

Huntedunscire.
Sumersete.

Bedefordscire.
Devenescire.

Northantonescire.
Cornvalgie.

Ledescestrescire.
Warwicscire.

Roteland,
Staffordscire.

Eurvicscire.
Sciropescire.

Lincolescire.
Cestrescire.

Exsessa,
Derbyscire.

Nordfolc.
Snotinghamscire. Sudfolc.
London is mentioned in Bede as the metropolis of the East
Saxons in the year 604, lying on the banks of the Thames,
6 the emporium of many people coming by sea and land.”:

In a grant, dated 889, a court in London is conveyed " at the ancient stony edifice called by the citizens hwæt

Bede, 1. 2. c. 3.

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