An Antiquarian Ramble in the Streets of London: With Anecdotes of Their More Celebrated Residents, Volume 2

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R. Bentley, 1846 - Literary landmarks - 465 pages
 

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Page 140 - Your infants in your arms, and there have sat The live-long day with patient expectation To see great Pompey pass the streets of Rome...
Page 94 - Fleet Ditch with disemboguing streams Rolls the large tribute of dead dogs to Thames, The king of dykes ! than whom no sluice of mud With deeper sable blots the silver flood.
Page 421 - ... for whose sake I am now as I am, whose name I could some good while since have pointed unto ; your Grace being not ignorant of my suspicion therein. " But, if you have already determined of me, and that not only my death, but an infamous slander, must bring you the enjoying of your desired happiness, then I desire of God, that he will pardon your great sin therein, and likewise...
Page 54 - The true genius is a mind of large general powers, accidentally determined to some particular direction.
Page 20 - There when they came whereas those bricky towers The which on Thames' broad aged back do ride. Where now the studious lawyers have their bowers, There whilom wont the Templar knights to bide, Till they decayed through pride...
Page 421 - You have chosen me, from a low estate, to be your queen and companion, far beyond my desert or desire. If then you found me worthy of such honour, good your grace let not any light fancy, or bad counsel of mine enemies, withdraw...
Page 421 - I no sooner received this message by him, than I rightly conceived your meaning ; and if, as you say, confessing a truth indeed may procure my safety, I shall with all willingness and duty perform your command.
Page 212 - Little Britain was a plentiful and perpetual emporium of learned authors ; and men went thither as to a market. This drew to the place a mighty trade ; the rather because the shops were spacious, and the learned gladly resorted to them, where they seldom failed to meet with agreeable conversation. And the booksellers themselves were knowing and conversible men, with whom, for the sake of bookish knowledge, the greatest wits were pleased to converse.
Page 134 - All good people, pray heartily unto God for these poor sinners, who are now going to their deaths, and for whom this great bell doth toll.
Page 371 - ... of all sorts, and tents erecting to shelter both people and what goods they could get away. Oh the miserable and calamitous spectacle...

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