Science Lectures for the People: Science Lectures Delivered in Manchester. 1866-[1880]. 1st-[11th] series, Part 1

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John Heywood, 1866 - Science
 

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Page 236 - ... upon the shore, at his feet. The wreck, even to my unpractised eye, was breaking up. I saw that she was parting in the middle, and that the life of the solitary man upon the mast hung by a thread. Still, he clung to it He had a singular red cap on, — not like a sailor's cap, but of a finer...
Page 244 - The two Newfoundland dogs coming to meet me with the usual carriage and the usual driver, and beholding me coming in my usual dress out at the usual door, it struck me that their recollection of my having been absent for any unusual time was at once cancelled. They behaved (they are both young dogs) exactly in their usual manner ; coming behind the basket phaeton as we trotted along, and lifting their heads to have their ears pulled — a special attention which they receive from no one else. But...
Page 18 - That the quantity of heat produced by the friction of bodies, whether solid or liquid, is always proportional to the quantity of force expended. And, 2nd. That the quantity of heat capable of increasing the temperature of a pound of water (weighed in vacuo, and taken at between 55 and 60) by 1 Fahr.
Page 236 - Ham watched the sea, standing alone, with the silence of suspended breath behind him, and the storm before, until there was a great retiring wave, when, with a backward glance at those who held the rope which was made fast round his body, he dashed in after it, and in a moment was buffeting with the water ; rising with the hills, falling with the valleys, lost beneath the foam ; then drawn again to land.
Page 236 - Some eddying fragments I saw in the sea, as if a mere cask had been broken, in running to the spot where they were hauling in. Consternation was in every face. They drew him to my very feet — insensible — dead. He was carried to the nearest house ; and, no one preventing me now, I remained near him, busy, while every means of restoration was tried ; but he had been beaten to death by the great wave, and his generous heart was stilled...
Page 236 - ... round his body, he dashed in after it, and in a moment was buffeting with the water; rising with the hills, falling with the valleys, lost beneath the foam; then drawn again to land. They hauled in hastily. He was hurt. I saw blood on his face from where I stood; but he took no thought of that. He seemed hurriedly to give them some directions for leaving him more free — or so I judged from the motion of his arm — and was gone as before. And now he made for the wreck, rising with the hills,...
Page 236 - Consternation was in every face. They drew him to my very feet — insensible — dead. He was carried to the nearest house ; and, no one preventing me now, I remained near him, busy, while every means of restoration were tried ; but he had been beaten to death by the great wave, and his generous heart was stilled for ever. As I sat beside the bed, when hope was abandoned and all was done, a fisherman, who had known me when Emily and 'I were children, and ever since, whispered my name at the door....
Page 247 - ... and that I had never known them apart from you. " It is a difficult thing for a man to speak of himself or of his works. But perhaps on this occasion I may, without impropriety, venture to say a word on the spirit in which mine were conceived. I felt an earnest and humble desire, and shall do till I die, to increase the stock of harmless cheerfulness.
Page 236 - I stood; but he took no thought of that. He seemed hurriedly to give them some directions for leaving him more free — or so I judged from the motion of his arm — and was gone as before. And now he made for the wreck, rising with the hills, falling with the valleys, lost beneath the rugged foam, borne in towards the shore, borne on towards the ship, striving hard and valiantly. The distance was nothing, but the power of the sea and wind made the strife deadly. At length he neared the wreck. He...
Page 147 - ... to show you that we now have the Railway Commission of Canada actually considering the question as to whether it will, in virtue of its general powers and general jurisdiction over the operation of the railways, do the very thing which we are asking Parliament to authorize by definite legislation. From what I have said, I think you will agree with me that I am correct in the statement that at last we are getting to pretty 'close grips...

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