How Benjamin Franklin, the printer boy, made his mark

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Gall & Inglis, 1875 - 264 pages
 

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Page 37 - Seest thou a man diligent in his business? he shall stand before kings ; he shall not stand before mean men...
Page 253 - Resolve to perform what you ought; perform without fail what you resolve. 5 FRUGALITY Make no expense but to do good to others or yourself; ie, waste nothing. 6 INDUSTRY Lose no time; be always employed in something useful; cut off all unnecessary actions.
Page 240 - And again, Pride is as loud a beggar as Want, and a great deal more saucy. When you have bought one fine thing, you must buy ten more, that your appearance may be all of a piece ; but Poor Dick says, It is easier to suppress the first desire than to satisfy all that follow it.
Page 9 - Don't give too much for the whistle
Page 264 - I have lived, sir, a long time, and the longer I live the more convincing proofs I see of this truth — that GOD governs in the affairs of men. And if a sparrow cannot fall to the ground without His notice, is it probable that an empire can rise without His aid? We have been assured, sir, in the Sacred Writings, that ' except the Lord build the house, they labor in vain that build it.
Page 35 - Industry all easy, as Poor Richard says; and He that riseth late must trot all Day, and shall scarce overtake his Business at Night; while Laziness travels so slowly, that Poverty soon overtakes him...
Page 35 - But dost thou love life, then do not squander time, for that is the stuff life is made of, as Poor Richard says.
Page 110 - In short, the way to wealth, if you desire it,. is as plain as the way to market. It depends chiefly on two words, industry and frugality ; that is, waste neither time nor money, but make the best use of both. Without industry and frugality nothing will do, and with them every thing. He that gets all he can honestly, and saves all he gets (necessary expenses excepted), will certainly become rich — if that Being who governs the world, to whom all should look for a blessing on their honest endeavors,...
Page 55 - Good," which, I think, was written by your father. It had been so little regarded by a former possessor that several leaves of it were torn out, but the remainder gave me such a turn of thinking as to have an influence on my conduct through life; for I have always set a greater value on the character of a doer of good than on any other kind of reputation ; and if I have been, as you seem to think, a useful citizen, the public owes the advantage of it to that book.
Page 252 - Attending duly the public worship. 4. Partaking of the Sacrament. 5. Paying a due respect to God's ministers. These might be all good things; but, as they were not the kind of good things that I expected from that text, I despaired of ever meeting with them from any other, was disgusted, and attended his preaching no more. I had some years before...

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