The Pearl Necklace and the Scarlet Frock; with the Evening Walk. Tales for Children. By the Authoress of “A Year's Residence in the Country.” [Signing Herself E- W-.]

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Page 89 - Wisely regardful of th' embroiling sky, In joyless fields and thorny thickets, leaves His shivering mates, and pays to trusted man His annual visit. Half afraid, he first Against the window beats ; then, brisk, alights On the warm hearth ; then, hopping o'er the floor, Eyes all the smiling family askance, And pecks and starts, and wonders where he is : Till, more familiar grown, the table-crumbs Attract his slender feet.
Page 23 - Negro divers is obliged daily to deliver to his master a fixed number of pearls; so that when they have got the requisite number of oysters in their bag, they begin to open them, and deliver the pearls to the officer, till they have made up the number due to their master; and if the pearl be not formed, it is sufficient, without any regard to its being small or faulty.
Page 22 - These they send to the islands, where they have huts built for their lodgings, and boats which hold eight, ten, or twenty negroes, under the command of an officer. In...
Page 44 - I have mentioned; but its infant state is exposed to a variety of dangers, the violent blasts of the north wind sweep away the eggs from the foliage of the plant, and, what is equally fatal to their...
Page 28 - Negroes' bodies, that they may be upon their guard; many, on the divers being in danger, have thrown themselves into the water, with the like weapon, and...
Page 28 - The officers keep a watchful eye on thefe voracious creatures, and pn aifcovering them, fhake the ropes faftened to the Negroes bodies, that they may be upon their guard ; many, on the divers being in danger, have thrown...
Page 27 - America, every negro, to defend himself against these animals, carries with him into the water a sharp knife, which, if the fish offers to assault him, he endeavours to strike into its belly; on which it generally swims off. The officers who are in the vessels keep a watchful eye on these voracious creatures; and, when they observe them approach, shake the ropes fastened to the negroes, to put them on their guard.
Page 22 - On reaching the bottom, they take up an oyfier, which they put under the left arm ; the fecond they hold' in t.heir left hand, and the third in their right: with thefe three oyfters, and fometimes another in their mouth, they rife to breathe, and put them in a bag. When they have refted themfelves...
Page 46 - ... thofe being their natural habitation, and where they enjoy a plenty of delicious food ; for though they often remove from one leaf to another, they never quit the plant ; nor is it uncommon to fee the leaves entirely covered with them, especially when they are arrived at maturity. When they have been confined fome time in thefe pots, they are killed and put into bags.
Page 23 - ... oysters in their bag, they begin to open them, and deliver the pearls to the officer, till they have made up the number due to their master ; and if the pearl be but formed, it is sufficient, without any regard to its being small or faulty. The remainder, however large or beautiful, are the Negro's own property, nor has the master the least claim to them ; the slaves being allowed to sell them to whom they please, though the master generally purchases them at a very small price. These Negroes...

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