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THE

ASTOR, LENOX AND
TILDEN FINAIINA.

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CONTENTS.

Our complaints against England,..197 Rebel States, ......

Forecast of Reformers,............202 True key to the Rebellion,.......218

Foreign discrimination in our case, 204 Moral character of the Rebellion, 219

Belligerent rights to rebels,........206 Southern demoralization,........219

Friendship of nations, .............208 Object of our Rebellion,.........220

War-Logic,....................... 209

....209 Rebel requitals of our lenity,.....221

Leaders, ..........................210 Rebel piracy,...

Independent of circumstances,.....210 The pirate Alabama,......... ...221

Reduction of war expenses in Eu- What our Rebellion costs,.... .... ..222

rope,...........................211 Sacrifice of life in 1862,............223

Separation impracticable,..........212 Military bounties, ................223

President Lincoln's Message,..... 213 | How England taxes,............ .224

Finances,.......... ......213 | Drunkenness in the army,........224

Question of Separation,.........213 The war of opinion,........,

Increase of Population, ..........214 Moral guaranties of Peace, . ...... 225

Emancipation Proclamation, .......215 Selfishness of nations,.............226

War decides nothing, .............215 | Barbarities in China, ..............226

Increase of our wealth, ............215 Big guns,.................... ... 226

Civil Law suspended in War,......216 Increase of the British Navy,......226

Jeliorations of War,..............217 | Peril of future wars, ..............227

Treatment of Surgeons, ..........217 How long will the Rebellion last?..228

Treatment of Chaplains,.........217 What do Peace-men think now?...228

The feeling in battle...............217 Aid to our cause, ..................228

Spirit of war,.....................218

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THE

ADVOCATE OF PEACE.

JANUARY AND FEBRUARY, 1863.

OUR COMPLAINTS AGAINST ENGLAND.

The English, surprised at the altered tone of feeling among our people towards them, ask what they have done to provoke or excuse our displeasure. It is certainly a fair question; and we will attempt an answer by glancing at what we conceive to be the chief grounds of complaint.

1. It seems to our people, then, that England has departed in this case from her lately proclaimed policy of Non-Intervention. Her treatment of us, whatever name she may give it, has clearly been a direct interference against our government in aid and encouragement of our rebels. No impartial observer can view it in any other light. We have never asked her help; we should have been quite content if she had let us entirely alone ; but, instead of this, she has from the start practically abetted the rebellion in every way she safely coulil. Well aware that its leaders were looking to her for countenance, she gave it in hot haste under circumstances which showed that she was only too glad of the chance. This idea, so patent now to every eys, is rooted in the minds of our people too deeply to be eradicated soon, if ever.

2. We think, moreover, that England has in this matter violated, in spirit, if not in the letter, her treaty obligations to us. These obligations, fairly and honestly interpreted, required her, in all her official conduct, to ignore the rebellion, and treat our rebels as we did hers in Canada, Ireland and India. What was that treatment ? Always as

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