A selection of moral lessons, natural history, Bible lessons, and poetry

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Page 124 - I would not enter on my list of friends (Though graced with polish'd manners and fine sense. Yet wanting sensibility) the man Who needlessly sets foot upon a worm.
Page 122 - See here thy pictured life; pass some few years, Thy flowering Spring, thy Summer's ardent strength, Thy sober Autumn fading into age, And pale concluding Winter comes at last, And shuts the scene.
Page 101 - And they told him all the words of Joseph, which he had said unto them: and when he saw the wagons which Joseph had sent to carry him, the spirit of Jacob their father revived.
Page 121 - Tis brightness all, save where the new snow melts Along the mazy current. Low the woods Bow their hoar head ; and ere the languid Sun, Faint from the west, emits his evening ray, Earth's universal face, deep hid, and chill, Is one wild dazzling waste, that buries wide The works of man.
Page 17 - A little neglect may breed great mischief; for want of a nail the shoe was lost ; for want of a shoe the horse was lost ; and for want of a horse the rider was lost,' being overtaken and slain by the enemy ; all for want of a little care about a horse-shoe nail.
Page 117 - And see where surly WINTER passes off, Far to the north, and calls his ruffian blasts : His blasts obey, and quit the howling hill, The shatter'd forest, and the ravag'd vale ; While softer gales succeed, at whose kind touch, Dissolving snows in livid torrents lost, The mountains lift their green heads to the sky.
Page 123 - Ever charming, ever new, When will the landscape tire the view ! The fountain's fall, the river's flow, The woody valleys, warm and low ; The windy summit, wild and high, "Roughly rushing on the sky ! The pleasant seat, the ruin'd tower, The naked rock, the shady bower ; The town and village, dome and farm, Each give each a double charm, As pearls upon an Ethiop's arm.
Page 18 - When you have bought one fine thing, you must buy ten more, that your appearance may be all of a piece ; but poor Dick says, ' It is easier to suppress the first desire than to satisfy all that follow it.
Page 119 - The careful hen Calls all her chirping family around, Fed and defended by the fearless cock; Whose breast with ardour flames, as on he walks, Graceful, and crows defiance.
Page 16 - What though you have found no treasure, nor has any rich relation left you a legacy. Diligence is the mother of good luck, and God gives all things to industry. Then plough deep while sluggards sleep, and you shall have corn to sell and to keep.

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