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- - e • - 235
Contest between the House of Commons and Wilkes - - ib.
His popularity . - - e - - - - - 236
His expulsion . - - • - - - - - - 237
He is re-elected fox Middlesex . - - - - - - 238
Meetings and subscriptions in his favour . - - - 239
Mr. Dingley e - - • - - - ib.

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The Chatham and Rockingham parties . - e - - 271

Bill on Controverted Elections . e e - • - 272

Declining health of Grenville . - - - - - ib.

Affairs of America - e - - - e - - - 273

Recall of Sir Francis Bernard . - e - - - 274

Tarring and feathering - e • s - - - - 275

Motion of Lord North in the House of Commons . - * 277

His able speech . - e - - - - - - • ib.

Mr. Welbore Ellis and Lord Barrington . - - - 278

Affray at Boston . - - - - e - e - e 279

Three persons killed . - - - - • - - - ib.

Trial of Captain Preston . e - - • - - - 280

Defended by Mr. John Adams . - - • - - • ib.

“The Massacre”. - e e - - • - - - 281

Governor Hutchinson . e • - - e - - 282

Wilkes released from prison • - - • - 283

Address from the City of London - - - - - - ib.

William Beckford, Lord Mayor - - - - • e ib.

His death . - - - - - - - • - - 285

Alderman Trecothick • - - - • - - - ib.

Affairs of Ireland • - - - • • - - ib.

Deaths of Grenville and Granby - - - - - - 286

CHAPTER XLIX.

The Falkland Islands . - e e - - - - e 288

British settlements upon them . - - - • - - 289

Invaded by a Spanish force e e - - - - - ib.

Indignation in England e • - • • - - - 290

Press warrants . - • - - - - • • - 291

Advice of Chatham - - - • - - - - • ib.

Policy of Louis the Fifteent e e e - - • 292

Madame du Barry e - e - - - - - 293

Fall of Choiseul . - e - - - • - • - ib.

Concessions of the Court of Spain e e - - - 294

Peace confirmed . e - e - - s • - ib.

Altercation between the two Houses - - - - - 295

Colonel Barré . • e - - e - - ib.

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The first ten years of the reign of George the Third are marked by frequent change of ministers, and intricate evolution of parties. To thread the maze which these afford is not always a pleasant, nor always a profitable, task. The want both of great men and of great objects is too often painfully apparent. Chatham, but Chatham only at this time, like some lofty pine tree in the forest, soars high above the under-growth of Rockinghams and Hillsboroughs, while the creeping parasite plants — the Rigbys and the Dodingtons — trail along the ground.

A knowledge of the party changes during these ten years is indeed essential to the study of English politics. But before we again embark upon them it may be instructive to reflect how far less important they were to the well-being of the country, than some other not so striking events which History does not always deign to record. What are they to the gradual extension of our manufacturing and commercial greatness? What are they to the growth of s cities as Manchester and Glasgow? What are they to tha system of agricultural improvement under which so many a barren down has teemed with luxuriant harvests, H that system unknown to Virgil, which, leaving no fallow to the soil, loses no profit to the husbandman*... How little thought

Mahon, History, V, ~~~~. To

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