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Lavish (taking cane from Frank). Only to help your memory.—Look!-(Jhaking it) - were you ever at Newmarket?

Alltrade (bowing). Yes, I was, Sir.
Lavish. And you'll oppose me in pursuing
Alltrade. No, believe me, Sir.
Lavish. And if you knew which road she took-
Alltrade. I'd tell you, upon my honour, Sir.

Lavish. Then retire-begone this inftant. And d'ye hear, if you're not satisfied with this treatment, call again, and I'll give you a warmer reception-(thaking his cane, ALLTRADE exit). And now for Juliana-now for the idol of my soul! -Frank, get the curricle: no, I shall only hurry and lame my own horses-get a chaise and four.

Frank. Chaise and four!-is this the way to retrench ?--and consider, Sir, Mits Sutherland has no money; and you always said you'd never marry any woman who had less than ten thousand pounds.

Lavish. I did: but that's an aukward lum: a woman with ten thousand pounds expects houses, horses, carriages-in short, to spend double her own income, and her husband's too. But a woman without a farthing; she manages the house, mends the linen, nurses the children, scolds the servantsmom Oh! that's the real rich wife--and the poor" Juliana will be the best bargain I ever made.-So go, do as I tell you : and observe, I'll marry her if I Tacrifice my whole fortune in the pursuit.

Frank. Sacrifice your whole fortune, Sir ! Lavish. Ay, I will, if I save it a thousand ways.

[Exeuni.

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SCENE--Outside of Lavish's House.

Enter Mrs. DAZZLE-ber hat and cloak on.

Mrs.Dazzle. So, now to enter this perfidious Captain's house. Not only love and jealousy urge me to separate him and Juliana; but as I know he don't mean to marry her, it is my business to get her once more into Alltrade

power :-yes, Miss Juliana; let me recover m husband's hundred thousand pounds, and I'll warı inc I'll recover my Captain. He, like the rest of the world, won't visit virtue in a cottage, but place me in a magnificent house,-ay, there's the secret :- 017-a-days people visit the building, not the owner of t; and on the size of the rooms, and the number of the entertainments, we may not only calculate our friends and admirers, but also the good and bad opinion of the whole fashionable world!

[Exit into Lavish's boufe.

Enter Worry and JULIANA.

Juliana. Look out; we are pursued :-I'm sure they were Mrs. Dazzle's servants.

Worry. They were! but we've outrun them.

Juliana. Yes: but if they come up with us, I shall be forced back and endure encreased persecu. tion:-Oh! I wish we were safe at this Mr. Mist's house.

Worry. So do I:--though you see what a strange gentleman he is !-he left us to examine the first now waggon we met; but don't despond, madam :-I won't leave youno, l'll die firft.

D 3

Juliana.

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Lavish (taking cane from Frank). Only to help your memory. -Look!-(Jhaking it) – were you ever at Newmarket?

Alltrade (bowing). Yes, I was, Sir.
Lavish. And you'll oppose me in pursuing
Alltrade. No, believe me, Sir.
Lavish. And if you knew which road she took
Alltrade. I'd tell you, upon my honour, Sir.

Lavish. Then retire-begone this inftant.And d’ye hear, if you're not satisfied with this treatment, call again, and I'll give you a warmer reception- (shaking his cane, ALLTRADE exit). And now for Juliana-now for the idol of my soul! ---Frank, get the curricle: no, I shall only hurry and lame my own horses--get a chaise and four.

Frank. Chaise and four!-is this the way to retrench ?--and consider, Sir, Miss Sutherland has no money; and you always said you'd never marrý any woman who had less than ten thousand pounds.

Lavish. I did: but that's an aukward sum: a woman with ten thousand pounds expects houses, horses, carriages-in short, to spend double her own income, and her husband's too.

But a woman without a farthing; she manages the house, mends the linen, nurses the children, scolds the servants--Oh! that's the real rich wife—and the poor" Juliana will be the best bargain I ever made.-So go, do as I tell you : and observe, I'll marry her if I Tacrifice my whole fortune in the pursuit.

Frank. Sacrifice your whole fortune, Sir !
Lavish. Ay, I will, if I save it a thousand ways.

[Exeuns.

SCENE-Outside of LAVISH's House.

Enter Mrs. DAZZLE-ber bat and cloak on.

Mrs.Dazzle. So, now to enter this perfidious Captain's house.--Not only love and jealousy urge me to separate him and Juliana; but as I know he don't mean to marry her, it is my business to get her once more into Alltrade's power :--yes, Miss Juliana ; let me recover my husband's hundred thousand pounds, and I'll warranc I'll recover my Captain. He, like the rest of the world, won't visit virtue in a cottage, but place me in a magnificent house,-ay, there's the secret :-now-a-days people visit the building, not the owner of it; and on the size of the rooms, and the number of the entertainments, we may not only calculate our friends and admirers, but also the good and bad opinion of the whole fashionable world !

[Exit into Lavish's house.

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Enter WORRY and JULIANA.
Juliana. Look out; we are pursued :-I'm sure
they were Mrs. Dazzle's servants.

Worry. They were! but we've outrun them.

Juliana, Yes : but if they come up with us, I shall be forced back and endure encreased persecution:-Oh! I wish we were safe at this Mr. Mist's house.

Worry. So do I:- though you see what a strange gentleman he is !-he left us to examine the first now waggon we met; but don't defpond, madam :-I won't leave you--no, l'll die firft.

D 3

Juliana.

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Juliana. Kind-generous ! but I cannot bear to involve you : remember you have a wife, and

Worry. Remember ! I shall never forget it !

Juliana. Nay: but a husband is of lo much consequence to his family

Worry. Bless you, I'm of no consequence ; nobody ever wants me:-if any body leaves a card, it's for Mrs. Worry :-if any body sends an invitation, it's for Mrs. Worry :-- if an invitation is sent in return, it's still Mrs. Worry: nobody calls or asks after the husband, except indeed the trader. people ! --they are kind enough now and then to notice me: but like other great married men, I'm obliged to be out when they call: so, curse me if I've even the pleasure of being at home to a dun! but we waste time, let us proceed to Mr. Mist's house.

Juliana. Ay: for Heaven's fake dispatch

Alltrade (without). You take that side of the road, I'll take this :- he cannot escape then.

Juliana. There, 'tis Mr. Allerade's voice !-and both sides of the road are guarded by enemies.

Worry. Yes: it's all over- we're between two 'fires.- Which way shall we go?-(Peinting to Lavish's door:) that door ftands most invitingly open, luppose we enter it.

Juliana. Do-instantly: why, what's the matter? you were quite valiant just now!

Worry. I was: but I fancy my courage is more like a new acquaintance than an old friend, -profelles a great deal at first, but generally sneaks off in the hour of danger: however, lead on-and let us hope to receive from strangers that protection which friends have denied us.

[Exeunt into Lavish's houss.

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