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Ap-Hazard. To be sure I have what's to Orville. Pay !-ten thousand pounds.

Ap-Hazard. Is that all ?-only ten thousand ! prha !-wheti a man's in luck, thousands are units -I'll pay it.

Orville. You !-ha!-ha!-how?
Tom. Ay; how ?-in paper or gold ?

Ap-Hazard. Neither-in lead ! (presents pistols) by shooting off the five fingers of the first hand that offers to touch kim---lay hold of my arm, brother hero—when I had bad luck, I made the bad share it, now I have good, the unfortunate shall partake of it; and there's such a charm about me at this moment, that only touch me, and you'll be invisible to all bailiffs, bullies, and black-legs.—1 behay'd ill to your wife, and you fought me

Tom. Mels! how's that ? did he fight for his wife?

Ap-Hazard. He did ; and I fought for her too fo here's a pair of us-keep off

Tom (standing before the stage door.) No--you don't--you shan't quit the room.

Orville standing by Tom.) No--that you shan't -Shall they, my friend?' Tom. Now for

you

shall my friend (to Orville) - look ye, fir; in my mother's absence, I am master of this house, and while I thought Şir Charles was no friend to my sister, I was none to him; but now I find I've been on a wrong tack, I'll stick to him, as long as the Thames Aows, and I'm Lord High Admiral of it !--so d'ye hear-cut--brushscud-set fail-hire off, or

Orville. Sir, I shall persist.
Ap-Hazard. Persift!-Oh!-he pushes his bad.

luck, F

1

luck, does he ?-here (putting money in bis hand,
and shutting it.)-odd or even for a hundred.
Tom. I tell you what

if you don't weigh anchor this moment, I'll force you and your Bailiffs into my long boat-heave you to leeward of the Sprightly Kitty, and open a broadside upon you, that Thall blow you all from Chelsea to the Red Sea.

Orville. Very well, sir,---you shall hear from me , depend on't---for you, Sir Charles, you are my prisoner to a certainty---to-morrow morning Sir Bamber marries Miss Union, and she'll take care

that neither you nor this booby shall ever fee one shilling of his property---so, now your luck's turn'd again.

[Exit. Sir Charles. How! after the affair at Mr. ApHazard's, will my uncle marry Miss Union ?

Tom. It's all owing to the Chaucerian Manuscript---to gain that he'll marry her, though it were as certain she'll steer him to Cuckold's Point, as that Columbus fish'd out America, and I won the Vauxhall Cup---She swore she came to your lodgings in search of Juliana, and as to the affignation, she threatens to have you hang’d for forging it.

Ap-Hazard. I forge it !---here it is---read--(gives then the letter).

Tom. Why this is in blackletter !-pooh !-this is more like my old boatswain's hand, than Miss Union's.

Sir Charles. That's her usual trick-she writes in a disguis'd hand to avoid detection---'sdeath! is there no way to put a stop to this marriage ? 'twill doom me to perpetual imprisonment, involve Mrs. Seymour, and break the heart of Juliana. Tom. There is no way-l'll bet ten to one--

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Ap-Hazard. I'll take any odds on any event, to any amount in fifties, hundreds, thousands, millions !

Sir Charles. You'll lose, I'll risk my life, fir.

Ap Hazard. Will you risk your money, sir!will you lay the long odds !—'twill be a noble hedge for you, and if each of you will bet me a hundred to ten

Tom. I'll bet you a hundred to ten, you don't upset the marriage.

Sir Charles. So will I.

Ap-Hazard. Done! done!-now then it's settled -Bam loses his wife, and I win the long odds. Farevell! follow me to old Blackletter's, and I'll shew you what's to pay, my boy! [Exit.

Tom. Brother, I hope you'll forgive me—I'm sorry I took part with that villain, for tho' not a salt-water sailor, I wish to be as like one as I canI make voyages and Neep in a hammock like a sailor, I drink grog and chew tobacco, though I hate it, like a failor ; I make love, tho' I'm not overfond of that, like a sailor ; I sing, dance, and spend my money foolishly, like a failor; and after copying them in all these things, shall I do a difhonourable action ?--No, dam’me, that wou'd not be like a sailor. [ Exit with Sir Charles.

SCENE.A Room, at Sir BAMBER'S. Enter Sir BAMBER and Miss Union, fellessed by

a SERVANT with a small green box.-Sit Bamber is trying to lay bold of the box, Miss Union preventing bim.

Sir Bambr. Do I behold thee?-does that an gelic little box contain my Trickarinda? F 2

luck, does he ?--here (putting money in bis hand, and shutting it. )-odd or even for a hundred.

Tom. I tell you what if you don't weigh anchor this moment, I'll force you and your Bailiffs into my long boat-heave you to leeward of the Sprightly Kitty, and open a broadside upon you, that shall blow you all from Chelsea to the Red Sea.

Orville. Very well, sir,---you shall hear from me , depend on't---for you, Sir Charles, you are my prisoner to a certainty ---to-morrow morning Sir Bamber marries Miss Union, and she'll take care

that neither you nor this booby shall ever fee one shilling of his property---so, now your luck's turn'd again.

[Exit. Sir Charles. How! after the affair at Mr. ApHazard's, will my uncle marry Miss Union ?

Tom. It's all owing to the Chaucerian Manuscript--to gain that he'll marry her, though it were as certain she'll steer him to Cuckold's Point, as that Columbus fish'd out America, and I won the Vauxhall Cup---She swore she came to your lodgings in search of Juliana, and as to the affignation, she threatens to have you hang'd for forging it.

Ap-Hazard. I forge it !---here it is---read-- (gives them the letter).

Tom. Why this is in blackletter !-pooh !-this is more like my old boatswain's hand, than Miss Union's.

Sir Charles. That's her usual trick—she writes in a disguis'd hand to avoid detection---’sdeath! is there no way to put a stop to this marriage ? 'twill doom me to perpetual imprisonment, involve Mrs. Seymour, and break the heart of Juliana.

Tom. There is no way~l'll bet ten to one--

Ap-Hazard. I'll take any odds on any event, to any amount in fifties, hundreds, thousands, millions !

Sir Charles. You'll lose, I'll risk my life, fir. Ap Hazard. Will you risk your money, sir ! will you lay the long odds ! -'will be a noble hedge for you, and if each of you will bet me a hundred to ten

Tom. I'll bet you a hundred to ten, you don't upset the marriage.

Sir Charles. So will I. Ap-Hazard. Done! done !-now then it's settled -Bam loses his wife, and I win the long odds. Farewell! follow me to old Blackletter's, and I'll shew you what's to pay, my boys ! [Exit.

Tom. Brother, I hope you'll forgive me—I'm sorry I took part with that villain, for tho' not a salt-water sailor, I wish to be as like one as I canI make voyages and neep in a hammock like a sailor, I drink grog and chew cobacco, though I hate it, like a sailor ; I make love, tho' I'm not overfond of that, like a sailor ; I sing, dance, and spend my money foolishly, like a sailor; and after copying them in all these things, shall I do a difhonourable action ?-No, dam'me, that wou'd not be like a sailor.

[Exit with Sir Charles.

SCENE.- A Room, at Sir Bamber's.

Enter Sır Bamber and Miss Union, followed by

a SERVANT with a small green box.Sir Bamber is trying to lay hold of the box, Miss Union preventing him.

Sir Bambr. Do I behold thee?-does that an gelic little box contain my Trickarinda? F 2

Miss

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