Page images
PDF
EPUB

“ The tribute of a free-will offering.”—Deut. xvi. 10.

THE TRIBUTE BOOK:

A RECORD OF THE

MUNIFICENCE, SELF-SACRIFICE, AND PATRIOTISM

OF THE

AMERICAN PEOPLE,

IN DEFENCE OF TIIEIR INTEGRITY AS A NATION, DURING THE W1!! FOR THE UNTOX.

ILLUSTRATED.

By FRANK B. GOODRICH,

Author of " Tue Court or NAPOLEON," &c.

Tue undersigned will publish, about October first, a book with the aboro title, the object of which is to preserve, in a permanent form, as large a portion as may be, of the names of those who have given of thoir means, or devoted their energies, to aid the Government in prosecuting tho war for the maintenance of the union of the States.

Tho work will thus be not only a record of those who have paid “tribute" to the cause, but will be itself a "tribute" to them.

The subject naturally falls under two hoads--the first comprising the spoptaneous gifts of money to aid in the raising of regiments, the equipment of troups, the outfit of officers, &c., upon the breaking out of the Rebellion; and the second -when this work had been assumed by the Government-chronicling the col. lecting, purchasing, forwarding, and distribution of supplios to promote the health, comfort, and efficiency of the army.

The first work was, of necessity, done without order or system; the second was accomplished by organized bodies, known as the Sanitary and Christian Commissions.

The book wilı in nowise be a mere list of names or catalogue of subscriptions, though in this respect it is intended to be as full as its limits will allow. In the first place, it will contain a general narrative of the events of the period connocted with the subject, enlivened by such incidents of personal effort and munificence (and the widow's mite will not be overlooked) as may properly find a place there, by authentic anecdotes, sketches of persons and places, &c., &c. ; and, secondly, it will be profusely illustrated by engravings upon wood, from designs by our first artists, executed in the best possible manner. The field for illustration is wide, and in this respect it is intended that the book shall not suffer by comparison with the finest issues of the American Press.

It is belioved that no record whatever exists of the largest and most interest ing portion of the free-will offerings of the American people, and it is the purpose of the publishers to supply this want. As an evidence that no expense has been spared, to produce a volume every way worthy of the subject, the pub. lishers beg to state, that the munificent sum of forty thousand dollars has been advanced by the projector of "The Tribute Book," George Jones, Esq., of the New York Times, for the first edition alone.

ILLUSTRATIONS, Five LAPGE DESIGNS, illustrating the Sanitary Commission, the Christian Commission, the

Western Sanitary Commission, the American Union Commission, and the National Freed.

men's Relief Association, and containing the Portraits of their Presidents. TWENTY-FIVE VIGNETTES and INITIAL LETTERS, for Comunittees of Sanitary Fairs. Four ILLUSTRATED PROGRAMMES of Entertainments for the Soldiers-Dramatic, Musical, School

and Amateur Theatricals. East Tennessee Scenery.

International Relief.-The George Griswold. Ruins of Chainbersburg.

Santa Claus lielping the Ladies of Cincinnati. Valley Forge.

Chrades and Tableaux Illustrated, Lake County Delegation Chicago Fair,

The Ideal Freedman. Waitresses at the Chicago Fair.

The Magic Lantern in the IIospital.
Front Stoop Fair.

An Aid Society's Rooms.
Six and Ninety-six Knitting for the Soldiers. Procession of ihe Nevada Sack.
Apple-Paring Bee.

The Farragut Fund.
Quilting Party.

The Kearsarge Fund. The Flag upon the Churches.

The Grant Fund. Minute Man of Kalamazoo.

Minnehaha. Bird's Nest Bank.

Mr. Murilock Reading in a Hospital. The First Subscription.

Patriot Orphan lompe. East Tennessee Reingees.

A Subscription on a Gunboat, Blackberrying for the Soldiers.

A Stage-Coach Concert. Cutting Wood for Soldiers' Widows.

The Everett Fund for East Tennessee. Making Shirts for Washington's Army.

A Soldier Dictating. Christian Commission in the Field.

A llospital Steamer. Barrelling Apples for the Soldiers.

One Day's Income, One Day's Lubor. Strawberry Festival.

The Soldiers' Thanksgiving. The Union Volunteer Refreshment Saloon. An Illustrated Bill of Fare. The Cooper-Shop Refreshment Saloon.

Busy Fingers. Hospital Scenes.

Fire Ambulance of Philadelphia. Getting in Hay for Soldiers' Widows.

The Sugar Pendulum. Voting for the Sword.

The Fair Newspapers. Treating a kegiment to Doughnuts.

One Cent in the Treasury, The Soliters' llome at Memphis.

The National Sailors' llome. Christmas Trees.-The Kearny Cross.

Ornamental Dedication. The Vanderbilt.

Pictorial Tribute to Abraham Lincoln.

[blocks in formation]

THE TRIBUTE BOOK will contain five hundred and twenty pages royal octavo, printed on fine tinted paper, and will be illustrated by over one hundred and fifty engravings. It will be bound in Turkey morocco, gilt edges and sides, in the best style of workmanship.

The Ruok will be sold exclusively by subscription, at the reasonable price of TWENTY DOLLARS.

DERBY & MILLER, Publishers,

5 SPRUCE STREET, NEW YORK.

CARPENTER'S

GREAT NATIONAL PICTURE.

THE FIRST READING

OF THE

Emancipation Proclamation before the Cabinet,

By PRESIDENT LINCOLN.

It was the most critical period of the war. MCCLELLAN's campaign befora Richmond, apon which hung the hopes of the whole loyal North, had just resulted in disastrous failare. After the most stupendous perparations known in modern warfare, the great sacrifice of life had secon shed absolutely nothing in crushing tho Rebellion, which, flashed with success, Tas more defiant than ever. Universal depression and discouragement succeeded the first brilliant hopes engendered by tho great uprising of the North, which followed the bombardment of Fort Bumter.

Thus far had the war been prosecuted by tho Administration without touching SLAVERY IN any manner. The Proclamations of Freront and HUNTER, in Missouri and South Carolina, had been nullified at Washington.

At length, the demand for a change of policy, beginning with a few radical men, became too decided to be longer ignored. The Anti-Slavery party, largely in the minority at the outbreak of the Rebellion, numbered its converts by millions, so deeply seated had become the conviction that SLAVERY was the sole root and cause of the War,

The President could no longer hesitate. The last of July, 1862, the Orst draft of the Proclamation was prepared and a Special Cabinet Meeting was called; but the occasion of the summons was not made known. Tho President said he had “ fully decided to take tho responsibility of the act of EvANCIPATION, but that suggestions as to the subject-matter were in order." Nothing was offered that he had not already anticipated and carefully considered, until Mr. SEWARD spoke: “This matter is of so much importance," said be, "that I fear its effect at this juncture; it may be considered the last measure of an exhausted Government-a cry for help-'the Government stretching forth its hands to Ethiopia, instead of Ethiopia stretching forth its hands to tho Government. Therefore, Mr. President, I suggest that you postpone the issue of the Proclamation until it can be given to the country upon Union success rather than defeat." The result was, that the Proclamation was resorved, and first given to the world amid the acclamations which followed the battles of Soutie MOUNTAIN and ANTIETAN.

This is the moment of time seized by Mr. CarpentER in the composition of bis picture The President seems suddenly arrestod and impressed by the wisdom of the view of the Secretary of State. In truth, it was an aspect of the caso, as he in forined the artist, that ne had unu that

momont entirely overlooked. This marked face and figure aro turnod towards Mr. Seward, who is in the act of speaking. lIo grasps the Proclamation in his left hand, which has dropped upon the table at his side; the old lines of humor are all gone from his face, and in their stead is a strange blending of firmness and anxiety. Slightly in the rear of Mr. Lincoln is the Secretary of the Troasury, Mr. Chase, standing with arms closely folded over his breast. The President is supported on each hand by the Secretaries of War and the Navy, Mr. STANTON upon the right and Mr. Welles on the left; both of whom, together with Mr. Chase, are looking, with varying shades of expression, towards the speaker, Mr. SEWARD. At the end of the table, opposite the President, leaning forward upon his arms, is JUDGE Bates, the Attorney-General. Inmmediately at his right, standing, as if having but recently entered the room, is MONTGOMERY Blair, the Postmaster-General. In the background, also standing, is the late Caleb B. Suitu, then Secrotary of the Interior.

By invitation of Mr. Lincoln, Mr. CARPENTER occupied the State Dining Roomn of tho “White House" during the painting of the picture, which consumed about six months.

From the New York Tribune “ It is, by all odds, next to Trumbull's Picture of the Declaration of Independence-a ploture worth all the rest in tho Capitol put together, the best work of this class that has been palnted in America."

From the Pittsburg Chronicle. AUTOGRAPOS.—The order-book for copies of the ongraving of Carpenter's great picture of the "Cabinet Council concerning the Emancipation Proclamation" contains some very valuable and interesting autographs. On the first page are the orders of all tho distinguished men whose portraits are on the canvas, and also of Secretaries Fossenden, Dennison, Cameron, and McCulloch. The first page of the Boston orders bears thu namo of Everett, Gov. Andrew, Sumner, Garrison, George Thompson, &c. Others are scattered throughout its pages, ainong which wo noticed those of Lieutenant-General Grant, Major-General Sherman, Senator E. D. Morgan, Frederick Douglass, Gerrit Smith, and many moro of cqual note

A MAGNIFICENT STEEL PLATE ENGRAVING

From this Picture is now being executed by the celebrated Artist,

A. H. RITCHIE.

The Size of the Engraving will be 21 inches by 32 inches, on

large and heavy Plate Paper.

SIZE OF THE PAINTING, 141 FEET BY 9 FEET.

PRICES. Artist's Proofs (signed), $50; India Proofs, $25; Prints, $10.

ADDRESS

DERBY & MILLER, Publishers,

5 SPRUCE ST., N. Y. THE ENGRAVING WILL BE SOLD BY SUBSCRIPTION ONLY.

Ageuts Wanted in every County.

THE

NEW YORK TIMES.

Daily, Semi-Weekly, and Weekly.

A POLITICAL, LITERARY, AND MISCELLANEOUS NEWSPAPER,

Edited by HENRY J. RAYMOND,
AUTHOR OF THE “LIFE, PUBLIC SERVICES, AND STATE PAPIRS OF ABRAUAN LINCOLN," ETG

1

THE NEW YORK TIMES is now in the fifteenth year of its publication, and is widely known as one of the most firmly established and successful newspapers in the United States. Throughout the recent war against the Rebellion it maintained, with unfaltering trust in the people, the cause of the Union and the Constitution, and gave to President Lincoln and his Administration a cordial, energetic, and effective support. It sustained the Proclamations of Emancipation, the various acts of Congress designed to strengthen the arm of the Government in its contest with rebellion, and the amendment to tho Constitution forbidding the existence of slavery within the limits or jurisdiction of the United States.

Now that the war is closed, the Times gives to the Administration of President Johnson a hearty support, in its efforts to reorganize Republican governments in the Rebel States, and to renew their constitutional relations with the National authority. It will urge the adoption of all just and proper measures for consolidating the peace and prosperity of the wholo country, upon the basis equal and cxact justice to all men of every section, without distinction of class or color. In the future, as it has in the past, it will insist upon intelligence and morality as the only just and proper foundation of Republican Institutions, and will advocate, with whatever ability it can command, the institutions of Education and Religion, by which these principles are to be instilled into the public mind and heart.

While a due share of its space is devoted to the discussion of Political topics, the Times aims also to give all proper attention to the Literature, Science, and Social topics of the day. It seeks to discuss every thing with candor, and with a view rather to the attainment of practical results than to the defence and propagation of special theories. It enjoys, in every department, the aid of experienced and accomplished writers, who are familiar with the subjects they treat, and who bring to the TIMES the benefit of a warm interest in its reputation and success.

Special attention is given to Congressional 'Reports, to Agriculture and Coun. merce, and to an accurate and intelligent record of the financial movements of the day.

The price of the New York Tives (Daily) is Four Cents, To Mail Subscribers, per annum

$10

THE WEEKLY TIMES. Including Sunday morning edition. $12.

One copy, 1 year...

Three copies, 1 year.
THE SEMI-WEEKLY TIMES.

Fresh names may at any time be added to One copy, 1 year..

$3 Clulis, both of the WEEKLY and SENI-WEEKL), Two copies. 1 year...

5 at Club rates Parents invariably in avance. We hare no authorized travelling Agents. Remit in necks or Post office money-orders whererer it can be done. Address, H. J. RAYMOND & CO., Publishers,

NEW YORK

« PreviousContinue »