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CONTINUATION

OF

Mr. R A P I N's

HISTORY

OF

ENGLAND;

From the REVOLUTION to the

Present Times.

By N. TINDA L, M. A.
Re&tor of ALVERSTOKE, in HAMPSHIRE, and
Chaplain of the Royal Hospital at GREENWICH.

ILLUSTRATED WITH
MAPS, GENEALOGICAL Tables, and the Heads

and MONUMENTS of the KINGS.

VOL. XXI. IXb of CONTINUATION.

LONDON:
Printed, by Aflignment from Mr. KNAPTON, for
T. OSBORNE, J. ROBINSON, H.WOODFALL, W.STRAHAN,
J. RIVINGTON, J. WARD, R. BALDWIN, W. OWEN, W. John-
STON, J. RICHARDSON, P. Davey and B. Law, T. LONGMAN,
T.FIELD, T. CASLON, S. Crowder and Co. H.WOODGATE,
M. COOPER, and C. WARE.

MDCCLIX,

226.1.758.

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Affairs of the North— Marriage of the princess Louisa

to the prince royal of Denmark-Naval affairs-in
the Mediterranean-in America-Domestic affairs
Parliament meets-Great debates about the Hanover
troops-Mr. Pelbam at the bead of the treafury-Mo-
tion for taxing places and pensions-For repealing the
septennial ažt-Great expence this year--- Account of
the negotiation between the French and the pretender
His son comes to France The French attempt to in-
vade EnglendThey are disappointed-Discovery of a
plot in England-War declared Bill enlarging the
time for the penalties of Treason---suspended.

T

HE princess Elizabeth of Ruffia, daughter to Peter Geo. II. the great, had by an unparalleled exercise of cou

1743 rage and prudence, advanced herself from being

the prisoner of the court, to be the sovereign of Affairs bes the country. The great dutchess, the prince of Brunswick tween Swea her husband, and the emperor Ivan, a child in the cradle,

? Ruffian were put under arrest. The counts N'unich, Osterman, and otbers who had been most instrumental in their elevation, were seized, tried, and condemned; but after being brought to the scaffold, their sentence of death was changed into that of perpetual banishment and imprisonment. The duke

den and

Geo. II. of Holstein, whose grandmother was the eldest sister to the 1743. late king of Sweden, and who consequently was lineal heir

to that crown, and whose mother was the daughter of Czar Peter the Great, was invited to Petersburgh, and having embraced the Greek religion, was, by the empress, declared publickly to be the heir of her dominions, which gave some uncasiness to the court of Denmark on account of the dutchy of Sleswick, his hereditary dominion, which that king possessed. The arts of France, during the late reign in Russia, had embroiled her with the crown of Sweden ; but a suspension of arms having taken place for three months, the Swedes des pending upon the unsettled state of the Russian government, demanded a restitution of great part of the places taken from them by the czar Peter. This demand being rejected with some scorn, the war between the two powers broke out afresh, greatly to the disadvantage of Sweden, who lost FredericIham, all their magazines, some of their best troops, and were driven out of Finland, which submitted to her Russian majesty. The French then offered their mediation by their ambassador Chetardie ; but as they were known to be the fomenters of the war, it was rejected by the court of Peters

burgh. Successors The affair, however, of the fucceffion to the crown of appointed to Sweden, gave an opportunity for the two powers to make

peace. The question about the succession was moved for in crowns,

the senate of Sweden, and the candidates were reduced to two, the duke of Holstein, who, as has been observed, had a lineal right to the crown, and prince Frederic of Hesse, nephew of the reigning king. The former carried it in the senate by a majority of two voices only. The.court of Great Britain had interested itself for the latter. A deputation being ordered to acquaint the duke of his election, they found that he had been declared heir to the empire of Rumia, and had embraced the religion of the Greek church, which incapacitated him from succeeding to the crown of Sweden. He, however, recommended to their choice the bishop of Lubeck, his uncle, who was every way unexceptionable ; and hopes were given by the Ruffian ministry, that if he was chosen, a good understanding might be restored between Russia and Sweden, which the latter greatly desired. The competitor against the bishop of Lubeck was the prince of Depmark, no party now appearing for the prince of Hesse. But the court of Petersburgh making the election of the bishop of Lubeck the price of its friendship, he was chosen. The Swedes having suffered greatly by the mismanagement of their gene

sals

botla those

rals and minifters in their late war with Ruffia, an enquiry Geo. II. into their conduct was set on foot; and the popular refent- 1743. ment was so high against Lewenhaupt, that he was beheaded merely to still the clamour of the people and senate, as was lieutenant general Badenbroke, against not only all justice but all evidence. The conferences at Abo, in which the peace between Russia and Sweden was restored, were in a great measure owing to his Britannic majesty's good offices; but the court of France, ever studious to embroil the princes of the North, endeavoured once more to throw them into confufion. His Danish majesty had been brought to refuse the renewal of the subsidiary treaty with Great Britain, and to conclude one with France. This last power suggested to him, that two princes of the house of Holstein being now declared fucceffors to two monarchies, it was more than probable that he might be disturbed in his poffeflion of the dutchy of Sleswick; and the French minister urged so much on that head, that the king of Denmark made great preparations, both by sea and land, to support the election of his son to the succession of Sweden. He was favoured by an insurrection of the Dalecarlians, the most warlike people in Sweden, in favour of the prince of Denmark, who was beloved by the commonalty all over the kingdom.

The late government of Russia being in the hands of Ger- Affairs of mans, had been in a great measure overturned by the in- Rulla. trigues of Le Chetardie, the French ambassador, on account of its attachment to the house of Austria. The queen of Hungary, therefore, could not help interesting herself in the fate of the princess Anne, late regent of Russia, the prince of Brunswick her husband, and their children, then confined in Fort Dundamond by order of the court of Petersburgh. She gave orders to the marquis de Botta, her minister there, to do ail he could with the empress to obtain their liberty. The French agents about the person of the empress had address enough to infinuate to her, that de Botta wanted not only the deliverance, but the restoration, of the prisoners. This infinuation received some colour from a plot that was discovered, or pretended to be discovered, at the same time, in favour of the exiled family, and some women and other persons who had been punished for the same, had named the mar. quis de Botta as the fomenter of it. De Botta, who appears to have been innocent, denied the charge, and insisted upon bis being recalled, that he might be put upon his trial. His mistress took his part, and the empress of Ruffia was

A 3

angry

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