Page images
PDF

A

SMALLER MANUAL

OP

MODERN GEOGRAPHY.

PHYSICAL AND POLITICAL.

By JOHN KICHARDSON, M.A.,

AUTHOR OF "A SCHOOL MANUAL OF MODERN' GEOGRAPHY" (SIXTH THOUSAKC).

C •'■ \

. MAR ff8l -I

LONDON:

JOHN MURRAY, ALBEMARLE STREET.

1880.

[2V*« Eight of Trantlation it retcrved.]

201. i. 2il.

By the same Author (500 pp.), post $vo. 5s.

A SCHOOL MANUAL OF MODERN GEOGRAPHY;

PHYSICAL AND POLITICAL.

This work has been drawn up for Middle Forms in Public Schools, Ladies' Colleges, Training Colleges, Assistant and Pupil Teachers, Middle Class and Commercial Schools, and Civil Service Examinations.

*' After a careful examination of Mr. Richardson's manual, we are bound to say that it is the most comprehensive, accurate, and methodical geography with which we are familiar, and bears on every page unmistakable traces of careful and industrious research. We have been surprised at the amount of new information which we have found."—School Guardian.

"This work has many admirable features, the facts are classified and arranged on a distinct and consistent method throughout. Illustrative, historical, and other remarks are both numerous and interesting. The definitions of terms are clear, these invariably, and individual names frequently, being accompanied with etymologies."—Educational News.

PREFACE.

This " Smaller Manual of Modem Geography" has been compiled at the urgent request of many Teachers who have been using the Author's "School Manual of Modern Geography." They have represented to him that they need a smaller book, drawn up on the same plan as the "School Manual," which they can put into the hands of their junior classes.

This work is therefore intended to supply this demand, and it is hoped that it may be found to meet to the fullest extent tho requirements of those for whose use it has been prepared.

The necessities of pupils who are beginning to acquire the chief facts of General Geography, have been constantly borne in mind, and no pains have been spared in the selection, verification, and arrangement of such facts to render the task of learners as easy and as pleasant to them as the nature of the subject admits of. Accuracy as to details also has been unremittingly striven after, in order that young students who shall have mastered what is here set before them, may have a solid and safe foundation for their future studies in the advanced branches of the Science.

In structure and general appearance this book bears a strong resemblance to the larger one, but it is by no means a mere abridgement of that work, for while, on the one hand, much is here omitted which finds its appropriate place in the " School Manual," on the other, much has been added here which would have been superfluous there. But in all which relates to the Geography of the manifold parts of the British Empire, the greatest fulness of detail consistent with the limits of the work has been maintained.

It is earnestly recommended that the book should always be studied with Atlas in hand, that the facts uamed in the one may be verified by constant reference to the other, so that they may become indelibly fixed in the memory. And in order to test themselves as to whether they know their task, young Students cannot do better than draw from memory rough maps of those portions of any country which they may have been studying, and fill in, also from memory, all those details to which the book has drawn their attention. This process, at first, may seem to be slow and very laborious. But Map-drawing is an exercise which soon grows fascinating to those who practise it regularly and intelligently, and its ultimate effects on the progress of Students are such as can be attained by no other means.

« PreviousContinue »