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to cool down or grow stale or | Ingine, n. [Form of engine.] unexciting; fresh, recent.

4 fA contrivance, device. 5. 1. 2. 4. 35.

Inlargo, v. [Form of enlarge.] To Humor, n. 1. Fancy, whim, ca- speak at large, expatiate. price. 2. 6. 97. 2. Disposition,

5. 10. temper. 1. 1. 6; 1. 1. 23; 1. In orthodoxe, phr. In a proper or 1. 42; 2. 6. 113; 2. 6. 122 ; 3. conventional manner. 3. 2. 9. 5. 50.

Instant, a. Pressing, urgent. 4. Humour, n. Strong personal in- 5. 20.

clination [to do something). Insufficiencie, n. fUnfitness, in3. 3. 90.

capacity. 3. 5. 120.

Intaile, v. [Form of entail.] To I, interj. Ay, yes. Ind. 37 ; bestow or confer as if by entail ; I. 56.

to cause to descend to a desigIllustrate, v. To shed light upon, nated series of possessors. illumine. 1. 5. 69.

6. 102. Impertinent, a. Meddling with

what is beyond ones province; Jack, n. (As a common noun.) intrusive; behaving without fA man of the common people; proper deference to superiors. å lad, fellow; a low-bred or I. 5. 45.

ill-mannered fellow.

I. Ch. Impertinent, n. An intrusive, 32.

presumptuous person. 3. 5. 42. Jewell, n. A costly ornament. Imploy, v. [Obs. form of employ.) In the general sense, obs. †To send on a special errand or

7. 24. commission. Ind. 41.

John à Noke, (or Nokes.) A Imprest, a. fof money : Lent or fictitious name for one of the

paid in advance. 4. 3. 14; 4. parties in a legal action (usu3. 35.

ally coupled with John-a-Stiles Inchant, v. [Form of enchant.] as the name of the other);

fTo attract, as if by magic. 2. hence sometimes used inde2. 3.

finitely for any individual perIncumbent, a. fImpending, im

2. Ch. 17. minent. 3. 5. 133.

John a Style, See John à Noke. Indifferent, a. *Having a neutral

2. Ch. 17. quality between excess and Juggle, v. † To amuse or enterdefect; of medium quality. I tain people by stories, songs, Ch. 76.

jesting, buffoonery etc. Induction, n. An introduction. 26.

Ind; 3. 5. 67. Infused, ppl. a. Imparted by Kallygraphy, n. [Form of calli

divine influence. 3. 5. 174. graphy.] Handwriting, penIngage, v. [Form of engage.] 1. manship. 3. 5. 12.

To pledge, to guarantee. Ind. Karlin, n. [Form of carline, or 52.

son.

I. Ch.

carling. (Northern M. E. ker. 2. To attract, charm, fascinate. ling.)] A woman, esp. an old Now rare. 2. 5. 30.

one; often implying contempt Ingenious, a. High-minded; or disparagement. I. 5. 23. honest, frank. 2. 5. 27

Kind, Phr. kind of, ' An indiIngenuity, n. fIntellectual capa- vidual that is, or may be, incity ; quickness of wit. Ind. cluded in the class in question,

though not possessing its full

49.

I.

I.

2. 29.

characteristics.' NED. I. teacher; authoritative. I. I. 7. 3.

13. Knowne, ppl. a. Having had Maiden-head, n. A represen. sexual intercourse. Arch.

4.

tation of the head or bust of 3. 27.

Virgin Mary as an ornamental

bearing om a shield. 5. 2. 27. Lack, v. †To need, stand in Maime, n. A wound or injury. need of. Salesman's cry, 'What Obs. or arch.

3. 3. II. d'ye lack.' Ind. 1; 2. 2. 49. Maine, a. Very great or consiLady, Phr. My Lady. The derable. 1. 3. 6; 1. I. 67.

Virgin Mary. 2. 2. 49. Maniple, n. A handful. 7. 1. 12. Landresse, n. (Form of laundress.) Marke, n. fi. The quarry of a 4. 7. 30.

hawk. Ind. 116. Lay, v. To prevent (a spirit) from 2. ‘A money of account, oriwalking.' 4. 4. 49.

ginally representing the value Lease, n. With reference to the of a mark weight of pure silver.

permanence of occupation gua- In England after the Conquest, ranteed by a lease. Fig. the ratio of 20 sterling pennies 4. 49.

to an ounce was the basis of Levitick, a. [Form of Levitic.] computation; hence the value

Pertaining to the book of of a mark became fixed at 160 Leviticus. Levitic Law, the pence=135. 4d. or 3 of the collections of ritual laws found £ sterling.' Obs. exc. hist. in the book of Leviticus.

NED. 4. 6. 27.

Marke, v. To observe; to watch. Lie, v. Of immaterial things : Now poet. 3 Ch. 16; 5. 5. 7.

To exist. Fig. 3. 5. 96. Mary, interj. The name of the Ligature, n. Ligament. 3. 4. 34. Virgin Mary used as an oath Light, a. 1. Deficient in weight; or an ejaculatory invocation.

below the legal standard. 3. 2. 10; 5. 10. 8o. Frivolous, unthinking. Play |Marsupium, n. The scrotum. these two meanings. 3. 3. 4. 35.

*Mas, A vulgar or jocular shorLight, v. To alight, settle, des- tening of master. 3. 1. 24. Ind. 122.

Mate, n. A suitable associate; Lights, n. pl. Pieces of informa- an equal in eminence or dignity.

tion or instruction; facts, dis- Arch. 2. Ch. 4.
coveries.
5. 5. 20.

Matter, n. Ground, reason, or List, v. To wish, desire, choose. cause for doing something. 3. Arch. 2. 3. 6.

3. 93 Livery, a. A distinguishing dress Maturely, adv. With full delibof servants. 5. 7. 70.

eration, after mature considLoam, n. Earth, soil, moistened eration.

2. 5. 20. clay. Arch. 1. 4. 16.

Maturity, n. fMature consideLord paramount, n.

ration; due deliberation. rior ; over lord. 4. 2. 14.

2.

on

6. 19.

cend upon.

Lord supe

2. 2.

5. 21.

Meane, v. To purpose, intend, Mad, a. 1. Extravagantly or design.

I. 4. 47 wildly foolish; frenzied. 1. 5. Meanely, adv. 111, badly. 29. 2. Angry. I. 5. 30.

126. Magisteriall, a. [Form of magist- Mend, v. To cure, reform (of a

erial.] Proper to a master or fault.) Arch. or dial. 3. 5. 86.

2. 6. +Art, craft, trade. minced form of God, in exI. 2. 29.

Mere, adv. Absolutely, entirely. Necessitous, a. Enforced. 2. 6. 106.

5. 132. Merkat, n. [Form of market.] Neerer, adv. comp. of neer. [Form

Phy. To make market. To of near.] More particularly ; barter away; to make illicit of affairs of greater concern. profit out of. 4. 7. 33.

5. 3. 29. Miracle, n. fA miraculous story. Nick, Phy. To nick it. To make I. Ch. 22.

a hit; to win against rivals. Misadvised, ppl. a. Ill-advised;

2. 4. 34 injudicious. 4. 7. 16.

Night-crow, n. A raven. 2. I. 16. Mischiefe, n. fAn injury, harm, Nip, v. To pinch, squeeze sharpor evil.

3. 5. 133; 3. 5. 142. ly. 3. 4. 6. Moath, n. (Form of moth.] So- Noble, a. A former English gold mething that eats away, gnaws coin, first minted by Edward

wastes away gradually. III, having the current value Fig. 2. 6. 144

of 16s. 8d. (or ios.) Pun on Moneth, n. [Obs. form of month.) this and current meaning. 4. I. 4. 37 ; 2. 3. 30.

6. 26. Mother, n. The hysterical passion Noise, n. Common talk, ru

(with quibble). 4. 7. 29; 511. Move, v. To propose or suggest Note, n. A mark or token from

(something to be done); to which something may be inbring forward (a matter). ferred. 4. 2. 25.

or

mour.

5. 4. 16.

2.

5. 6.

Mrs., n. fIn the 17th and 18th O', prep. [Worn down or apo

c. prefixed to the name of an copate form of of.] Ind. 6. unmarried lady or girl; equi- etc. valent to the mod. use of Miss. Obnoxious, a. Liable to injury. 1. 2. 3.

3. 5. 15. Murther, n. [Form of murder.] Observe, v. †To treat with cere

fTerrible slaughter, destruc- monious respect or reverence ;

tion of life. I. 5. 60; 3. 4. 19. to honor; to humour, gratify. Mushrome, n. [Form of mush

2. 6. 93. room.] An upstart. Hence, Occasion, n. Cause. I. I. 12; fa contemptible person. Fig. I. I. 33 3. 5. 70.

Occasion, v. To cause. 3. Ch. 11. Musse, n. fA scramble. 4. 3. 10. 'Od, interj. A contracted or Mysterie, n.

pression 'od shield. 1. 4. 17.

of, adv. + Off. 4. 4. 51. Name, n. The name of a person Off, v. †To leave off, put off.

with implication of the indi- 5. 7. 24.

vidual denoted by it. Ind. 62. Offer, v. To attempt; to put Nay, adv. Used as introductory forth effort. 1. I. 38.

word without any direct nega- Office, n. Duty attaching to ones tion. 1. Ch. 35.

station or position. 2. 6. 61 ; Neat, a. 1. †Elegant, trim, fashio- 3. 5. 48; 4 Ch. 4.

nably dressed. 1. 3. 36; 2. Often, a. Frequent. Arch. 3. 2. 43

5. 119. 2. † Suited to refinement or Ope, v. Reduced from open. †To elegance. 2. I. 14

reveal, disclose. Poet.

4. 7. 3. fSkillful, clever.

2. 3. 45. 42.

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Open, a. Liberal, generous. 2. Particular, a. Individual. 2. Ch.

68.
Open, v. To state (a case) to the Parts, n. Abilities, talents, (al.

court, preliminary to adducing most always in pl.) Arch. Ind.
evidence; esp., to speak first 15; 55; 4. 6. 14.
in a case; to open pleadings. Party, n. A particular person.
Law. I. 7. 23.

Now vulgar. 3. 6. 7.
Opinion, n. Reputation. 1. 1. Pase, v. [Form of pass.) To go,
39.

walk. 5. 2. 23. Oppilation, n. An obstruction. Passage, n. A flight; also fig. Med. 3. 4. 70.

a dispute, verbal altercation. Or, conj. In correlation : 07-09. 2. 6. 152.

either-or. Arch. or poet. 1. 5. Passe, v. To give in pledge; 6; 2. 6. 99; 3. 5. 34.

to pledge. Ind. 51. Order, phr. To take order. †To Passion, n. The condition of

deal with, manage (in a speci- being acted upon, the being ficed manner.) 5. 2. 9.

passive. 3. 5. 184. Ordinance, n. Order, regulated Patentee, n. tone to whom

condition. Ohs. in general. 3. something has been granted.
5. 103

Fig. 2. 7. 6.
Orient, a. The colour or peculiar Paynim, n. A pagan, heathen;

lustre of a pearl of the best à non-Christian: esp. a Mo-
quality. Rare. 5. 7. 91.

hammedan, a Saracen. Arch. Out, interj. With ellipsis of

and poet.

I. Ch. 19. intr. v.

(go, come, etc.) An Pox, n. [Form of pocks, pl. of exclamation expressing lamen- pock.] Formerly much used tation, abhorrence, in- in imprecative phrases. 3. 2. 3. dignant reproach. Arch. or Peach, v. To give incriminating dial. I. 5. 21.

or

evidence against, inform against Over, adv. Beyond what is nor- (an accomplice or associate).

mal or proper ; excessively. I. Now Rare. 4. 7. 34 I, 61.

Pease-dresser, n. One who pre

pares peas by making ready to Pack, v. 'To select or make up cook, or cooking. 4. 7. II. (a jury or a deliberating or Peece, n. [Form of piece.) A voting body) in such a way as gold piece; a coin.

4. 6. 27. to secure a partial decision, or Peice, n. [Form of piece.) A further some private or party

person, an individual. Arch. ends.' NED. 3. 3. 6; 3. 3. 22.

and dial. 4. 2. 38. Panoplie, n. [Form of panoply.) Piece, of Phr. † Somewhat of; A complete suit of armour. one who partakes to some ex

tent of the character mentioned Panym, a. See Paynim. 3. 2. 10. 1. 2. 30. Paralaxe, n. [Form of parallax.] Perdu, n. [Partly short for fChange, alteration.

1. 6. 39.

sentinel perdus or Fr. enfants Parasite, n. One who lives at perdus.) A soldier placed in

another's expense and repays a position of special danger, him with flattery.

and hence considered as virI. 3. 40.

tually lost or in a desperate Parerga, n. pl. Of Parergon.

5. 3. 122. By-work, subordinate or se- Peremptory. a. Positive in opicondary business. 1. 7. 69. nion or assertion ; esp. in bad

3. 5. 81.

Ind. 3:

case.

1.

Ind. 9.

Ch. 32.

use.

n.

sense, intolerant in debate or Poetaster, n. A petty or paltry contradiction; dogmatic. poet; a rimester.

Poetito, n. A paltry poet, a Perimeter, n. The continuous poetaster. [Ital. deriv. of L.

line or lines forming the boun- poeta, poet.] Ind. 9. dary of a closed geometrical Point, n. The essential or imfigure; circumference. Fig. portant thing. 4. 7. 48.

Ind. 97; 3. 3. 98. 'Point, v. [Contraction of apPerk, v. To assume a self-asser- point.] To make an appoint

tive, or conceited attitude or ment, Arch. 4. 6. 5. air. 3. 5. 172.

Policie, n. Government. 4. 3. Perplex, v. To complicate; to 22.

make intricate. 4. Ch. 32. Politique, a. [Obs. form of Person, n. [Form of parson.) A politic.1. Political. 1. 7. 6; clergyman. 1. 5. 24.

2. 6. 65. Perstringe, v. To criticize ad- 2. †Sagacious, prudent. 4. 8. versely. 2. Ch. 2.

63. Pert, a. Saucy, impudent, in- Politique, 1. A shrewd

decorously loquacious. 3. 1. 32. schemer. 2. fA sagacious, pruPestilent, a. Dangerous to reli

dent person.

Play on these gion, morals, or public peace.

two meanings. 3. 5. 53. 2. 6. 126.

3. t' One of an opportunist Phansie, n. [Form of phantasy and moderate party, which

or fantasy.] Extravagant or arose in France c. 1573, during visionary fancy. Ind. 1. the Huguenot wars, and rePhansie, v. [From of fancy.] To garded peace and political re

imagine. Ind. 92; 2. Ch. 21. form as more urgent than the Phlebotomy, n. The action or decision by arms of a religious

practice of cutting open a vein quarrel; also a sympathizer so as to let blood, as a medical with this party elsewhere.' or therapeutical operation. 3. NED. 3. 5. 21; 4. 45.

4. in pl. Politics.

4. 3. 12. Piece, v. To reunite, rejoin, (a Port, v. †To carry, bear, convey.

broken friendship). 3. I. 14. 1. 5. 48. Piercing, ppl. a. Sharp, keen. Poultrounerie, n. Cowardice. 3. penetrating. 1. 5. 20.

5. 36. Pimpe, n. A pander, procurer. Practice, n. A scheme or plan

Pimpe errant. In humorous made for an evil purpose. 4. imitation of knight errant, etc.

Practise. 4. 8. 56. 5. 4. 19.

Pragmatick, a. (Form of prag. Pinke, n. A hole or eyelet pun- matic.] Officiously busy in

ched in a garment for deco- other people's affairs; meddrative purposes. 3. 5. 75. ling.

2. 6. 144. Plant, v. Post, station. Ind. 114. Prescribe, v. To appoint, direct. Plastick, n. [Form of plastic.)

I. 7. 8. A modeller, moulder, sculptor. Present, a. Actually in hand, 4. Ch. 14.

dealt with, considered. Ind. Poesie, n. fA motto or short 74. inscription. 4. 6. 51.

Presently, adv. Immediately, at Poet'accio. n. Poet, a term of

Arch. 3. 3. 125, 3. Ch. disparagement; [Ital. poetaccio.) a poetaster.

Presentment, n.

The act of

4. 10.

once.

12.

Ind. 9.

P

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