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Ch. 25.

2.

Conjure, v. To bring about as Crafty, a. Skilful, clever, ingeby magic or supernatural in- nious.

1. 6. 24. fluence. 3. 2. 33

Cranch, v. [Form of craunch.) Conscience, n. Reasonableness, To crush with the teeth; to eat understanding. Ind. 49.

greedily. 1. 4. 14. Consort, n. fCompany. 2. 6. 143. Crimpe, n. An obsolete game at Constitution, n. Physical nature, cards. 2. 3. 25. vitality. I. I. 6.

Crosse, v. To thwart. 5. 8. 29. Containe, v. To govern; keep Cry, v. fTo call for, demand under control. 5. 7. 47.

loudly. 5. 6. 16. Contumely, n. Insulting or offen- Cry up, Phr. To proclaim (a

sively contemptuous language thing) to be excellent; to extol. or treatment. 3. 3. 17.

1. 7. 38; 4. 2. 12. Convenient, a. † Suitable to the Cryer, n. One appointed in a circumstances; appropriate. 4. town or community to make

public announcements. 5. 6. Cope, n. A vestment of silk or

17. other material resembling a Cullice, n. A strong broth, made long cloak, made of a semi- of meat, fowl, etc., boiled and circular piece of cloth, worn by strained; used especially as a ecclesiastics in processions, also nourishing food for sick per. at Vespers, and on some other sons.' NED.

4. 7. 25. occasions. Eccl. I. I. 86. Cunning, a. Possessing knowlCopie, n. [L. copia, abundance.] edge or skill.

2. I. 13; 2. 2. †A copious quantity. 2. 1. 19.

41; 4. 3. 26. Corrant, n. [Form of courant.] *Possessing supernatural †A message or messenger. I.

power or skill.

5. 9. 17. 7. 41.

Curious, a. f1. Excellent, choice, Correspondence, n. fIntercourse, fine. I. 4. 29.

communication of a secret na- †2. Minute in inquiry or disture. I. 7. 41.

crimination, subtle.

4. 7. 46. Corrier, n. [Form of currier.] Cut-worke, n.

A kind of open. One whose trade is the colour- work embroidery or lace worn ing ofl eather after it is tanned. in the latter part of the 16th

and in the 17th cen. 5. 3. 27. Corroding, ppl. a. fEating into; gnawing away.

4. 8. 28.

Dainty, a. 1. Rare. I. 4. 16. Cosen, n. [Form of cousin.) A 2. †Excellent, choice, fine.

term of intimacy or friendship. 4. 63; 2. 2. 1 ; 2. 3. 72. 3. 4. 20.

Damne, v. fto pronounce adCounsell, n. [Form of counsel.] verse judgment upon; to ex

A matter of confidence or se- press disapproval of; to procret. 5. 6. 2.

nounce a failure. 1. Ch. 38. Course, a. [Form of coarse.) Death, interj. A vehement ex

Rude, uncivil, vulgar. 1. 5. 67. clamation or imprecation. Cous'nage, n.

[Form of Cose- 5. 26; 3. I. 3. nage.] Deception, fraud. 5. Decorum, n. fThat which is 10. 109.

proper to the circumstances or Covey, n. A set or company of requirements of the case. Arch. persons.

Arch. 2. 6. 158.
Cracked, ppl. a. Fig. Damaged, Dedicate, ppl. a. Devoted.

3. 3. 62.

I.

1.

Ind. 79.

I.

impaired. 5. 1. 16.

6. 15.

3. 3. 8.

Deduce, v. fTo deduct, substract. Divers, a. Various, sundry, sev2. 6. 26.

eral. Arch. Ind. 8. Defalk, v. To diminish by cutt- Doome, v. To judge. Obs. or ing off a part. 5. 8. 42.

arch. in general. Epilogue. Delicate, a. Delightful, charm- Dominus, n. L. Master, 2. 4. 15. ing 2. I. 17. Don, A title applied to persons

of Deposition, n. Testimony given high importance or leading

upon oath in a court of law. position: applied ironically to 3. 3. 57.

one giving himself airs of imDetermine, v. To end, terminate. portance. 4. 3. 33. 3. Ch. 15.

Doublet, n. A close-fitting body+Devow, v. To devote. 1. 6. 30.

garment, with or without sleeDiametrall, a. Directly opposed. ves, worn by men from the I. I. 7.

14th to the 18th centuries. Diamont, n. (Form of diamond.) Obs. exc. Hist. 2. 4. 27.

Doubt, v. To fear, be afraid. 5. Diaphanous, a. Permitting the

I. 5. free passage of light and vision; Dousets, n. pl. [Form of doucets.] transparent. 2. I. 16.

The testicles of a deer. 5. 5. 2. Dictamen, n. ? Obs. Precept, dic- Doxey, n. A beggar's mistress or tate, pronouncement. Ind. 118.

paramour. 4. 8. 19. Diet-drink, Special drink Drive, v. To carry on vigorously ;

prepared for invalids or per- prosecute; conduct; practice. sons under dietetic regimen. Ind. 8.

3. 4. 58. Discharge, v. To pay. 3. 4. 40. Discover, v. To reveal, show. Eeene, adv. [Form of even.] Now rare. 5. 2. 7.

Prefixed to a subject, object, Discovery, n. Disclosure, reve- or predicate to emphasize its lation. Now rare. 5. 10. 133

identity. Obs. exc. arch. Discretion, n. †Discernment in

24. practical matters. 1. 40. Elfe-lock, n. A tangled mass of Disfurnish, v. To deprive of. hair, superstitiously attributed 6. 156.

to the agency of elves, esp. Dispatch, n. Settlement, accom- Queen Mab. Ind. 123. plishment 1. 2. 8.

Ember-week, n. A week occurDispatch, v. To settle, accom- ing in each of the four seasons

plish. 2. 5. 62 ; 3. 6. 10. of the year, which includes Dispute, v. To argue. 3. 5. 98. days set apart by the Roman Disputing, ppl. a. Given to Catholic church for prayer and

dispute, disputatious. 1. 2. 44. fasting. 5. 2. 10. Dissolution, n. Termination, end- Eminence, n. 1. A rising ground, ing. I. I. II.

hill. 2. A distinction. Ind. 31 Distomper, n. * Derangement or Empire, n. Absolute comman disturbance of the “ humour or control. Fig. 2. Ch. 47; 3. temper (according to

5. 49. mediaeval physiology regarded Encomiastic, n.

Form of encoas due to disturbance in the miastic.] †A eulogistic disbodily humours)'; ill humor; course or composition. 1. 6. II.

ill temper. 3. 5. 129; 5. 1. 27. Encounter, 1. Occurrence. Divell, n. (Form of devil.] Rogue, Rare. 2. A meeting (of adrascal.

4. 4. 20; 4. 4. 25. versaries); a conflict. Passage ments of; to answer. I. 5. 71.

2. 2.

I.

2.

or

n.

sure.

3. 5. 6.

Ind. 130.

on

or

or

may partake of both meanings. | Faine, adv. Gladly, with plea4. Ch. 25.

Ind. 82. Envious, a. Full of ill-will; Faire, a. †Kind, gracious. 1. I. malicious. 4. 8. 21.

28. Epitasis, n. The second part of Faith, interj. In or on one's

a dramatic work; the part in faith. Obs. or arch. which the action begins. 1. Fame, n. Common talk , rumour. Ch. 9; 2. 73.

Now rare.

4. 7. 24Ergo, adv. Logic. [L. ergo there- Farragoe, n. [farrago.) A medley

fore.] A word used to mark or mixture of material things or the conclusion of a syllogism. persons. I. 7. 19.

Feat, n. †A professional operaErrant=Arrant, a. 1.With oppro- tion or service. 1. 6. 25; 4. 6.

brious force : Notorious, down- 28. right. 2. Without opprobrious Feate, n. fAn action, deed. 5. 8. force : Thorough, genuine, com- 52. plete. Pun these two Fee-simple, n. 'An estate held meanings. 3. 4. 65.

on condition of homage and 3. Travelling, wandering. 4: service to a superior lord by Erring. Humorous connota- whom it is granted and in tion of both meanings. 5. 4. whom the ownership remains.' 19.

NED. 2. 6. 153. Esteeme, n. Regard; respect; Fellow, n. tone who shares with favorable opinion. Obs.

another in an official dignity, arch. I. 7. 40.

the performance of any Ethnick, n. Pagan; a nation not work; a partner, co-worker. Christian or Jewish. 3. 5. 176.

Ind. 61. Ever, adv. Constantly; with con- Fellowes, n. pl. Equals in positinual recurrence. Arch.

tion or rank. 3. 5. 46. 19.

Fether, .n. [Form of feather.] Exact, a. fConsummate, finished, Used derogatively: A nobody: perfect. 3. 3. 13.

a mere nothing. I. 3. 17. *Exacuate, v. To sharpen, sti. Fidler, n. [Form of fiddler.) A mulate, excite. 3. 3. 79.

trifler.

2. 6. 143 Execution, n. Infliction of da- Figure-flinging, vbl. n. Figure

mage or slaughter. Now almost casting; calculating astrologexclusively in phr. to do exe- ically. 4. Ch. 21. cution. NED. I. 5. 55.

Fine, a. Intellectually subtle, Exemplified, ppl. a. Made an clever, ingenious.

1. 6. 25. example of. 3. 5. 137. Fire, n. Ardour of temperament; Expect, v. †To wait for, await. fervour.

1. 2. 4 1. Ch. 10: 4. Ch. 5.

Fit, n. fA painful or exciting Expostulate, v. To complain of, experience. 3. 4. 77. remonstrate with

person Fit, v. fTo satisfy the requireabout.

I. 3.

a

*Flatuous, a. Full of wind or Fable, v. 1. †To talk, tell. 4. 1. gas; flatulent. 3. 3. 108.

9. 2. To speak falsely, lie. Fly, n. I. A fly wheel or other Obs. exc. arch. 2. 5. 40.

device used to regulate the Face, n. Presence; countenance speed of machinery. 2. 4. 10. as expressing feeling. 2. Ch. 2. A parasite.

2. 6. 144. 57.

Fly, v. To chase with a hawk;

4. 3. 16.

3. 38.

2.

a.

1. 2. 20.

Ind. 73.

to attack by flying. Phr. Fly Geere, v. [Form of jeer.] To to the mark : Attack everything speak in mockery. 3. 6. 10. you see as quarry. Ind. 115. Gentile, a. [Form of genteel.] Phr. To fly at. To attack. 3. A re-adoption, at the end of

the 16th c. of F. gentil, which Fomenting, ubl. n. | Stirring up, had been previously adopted rousing. 1. Ch. 43

in the 13th c., and had assumed Fond, a. Foolish, silly. 2. 5. 37. the form of gentle.' NED. Footing, vbl. n. Track, trail. 1. Polished, well bred. Now rare. 5. 5. 44

Appropriate to persons of rank For, conj. fintroducing the or quality. Ind. 106.

cause of a fact; because. 3. Gentleman-usher, n. A gentle2. 45

man acting as usher to a person Forge, n. tInvention. 4. 4. 41. of superior rank. 2. 3. 25. Forme, n. Behavior, manners, Ghastly, fCausing terror,

etc. which satisfy the current terrible. 1. I. 48. ideals of 'society.' 2. 5. 59. Gills, n. (pl.) The mouth, jaws, 2. A grade in English public or face. Slang. schools. Ind. 40.

Gance at, phr. To allude or Foro (In foro) adv. phr. In court; refer to obliquely or in passing, in the open.

usually by way of censure or Foxe, n. f' A kind of sword. It satire; to hit at. 1. I. 65.

has been conjectured that this Gleeke, n. 'A game at cards, arose from the figure of a wolf, played by three persons; fortyon certain sword-blades, being four cards were used, twelve mistaken for a fox.' NED. being dealt by each player, I. I. 47.

while the remaining eight formFricace, n. 1. ? Friction. 2. ?' A ed a common stock".' NED.

sort of medicine, probably 2. 3. 25. intended to be rubbed upon Gloworme, (Form of glowthe part diseased.' Nares. 3. worm.) An insect the female

of which emits a shining green From, prep. †Apart from.

3. light. 5. 5. 14. 3. 119.

Goe, v. †To walk. Epilogue. Furnished, ppl. a. Accoutred, Gok't, ppl. a. [Form of gucked.]

provided with necessaries. Foolish. 2. 32.

Goodwy', See Goody. Furze, n. A spiny evergreen Goody, n. [Shortened from good

shrub with yel flowers, wife.) A term of civili forgrowing abundantly on waste merly applied to a woman, lands throughout Europe. 5. usually a married woman, in

humble life. 2. 2. 26.

Gossip, n. I. A sponsor at bapGallant, Courtier-like ; tism.

I. 3. 41. 2. Familiar fashionable. 2. Indulging in acquaintance, friend, chum. social gaiety or display. Ind

1. 2. 24 47.

Grace, n. A favour, in contraGarnish, a. * Used to provide distinction to a right or obli

dress, clothes, esp. in an elegant gation. Somewhat arch. fashion. 5. 8. 42.

5. 23. Geare, n. Doings, affair. 2. 2. Granam, (Form of grannam.) A 44.

grand mother; an old woman. 5. II. Harrington, under a patent Hot, a. That has not had time

n.

2. 17.

I.

3. 6. 6.

7. 18.

a.

I.

2. n.

a

are

4. I. 6.

Obs. exc. dial.

4. 7. 35; 4. granted him by James I in 8. 66.

1613. 2. 6. 101; 4. 8. 74. Gratulate, v. †To offer congra- Have, at, v. phy. To go at or tulations. 5. 8. 4.

get at, esp. in a hostile way. Gravity, n. Weight, authority. Chiefly in imperative; announI. I. 39.

cing the speaker's intent to Greene sicknesse. Path. get at or attack.

2. 6. 141. Chlorosis ; disease mostly Head, Phr. Of the first head; affecting young females about • said of a deer, etc. at the age the age of puberty, characte- when the antlers first rized by anemia, suppression developed ; hence fig. of a man of the menses, and a pale or newly ennobled or raised in greenish complexion.' NED. rank.' NED. 2. 3. 58. I. 4. 17; 2. 2. 22.

'Hem, phr. pl. [O. E. him, heom.] Grogoran, n. [Form of grogram.] Them. Common in early

A coarse fabric of silk, of Mod. Eng., in which it came mohair and wool, or of these to be regarded as a contr. of mixed with silk; often stiffened the equivalent them, and was with gum.' NED.

therefore in the 17th c. often Ground, n. 1. Basis, foundation. printed 'hem, 'em.' NED. Rare. I. 6. 27.

2. Motive, 1. 2. 36. valid reason.

4. 3. 29; 5. I. 30. Heresy, n. Opinion or doctrine Guard, n. An ornamental border characterizing particular indi

or trimming on a garment. viduals or parties. 2. 6. 113.

Obs. exc. hist. or arch. 1. 6. 22. Heterogene, a. Heterogeneous. Gueld, v. [Form of geld.) † To ?Obs. 2. 6. 106.

deprive of some essential part. Hieroglyphick, n. (Form of hiero

Transf. and fig. 2. 5. 64. glyphic.] A symbol, an Gums, n. pl. *Mucilaginous or blem.

2. 6. 74. resinous products employed High, a. 1. Luxurious. as drugs or perfumes. 3. 2. 9. treme, i. e. ' high church.' Play

one these meanings. 3. I. 5. Hag, n. An old woman. 5. 9. 5. Historified, ppl. a. Celebrated in Haggard, a. Of a hawk : Caught history. 3. 5. 157.

after having assumed adult Histrionicall, a. [Form of histriplumage; hence, wild, untamed. onical.) Acting a part, feigned. 3. 3. 38.

Fig. 3. 5. 141. Halfe, n. A husband. 2. 2. 6. Hole, n. Cave. den. I. I. 50. Hall, The, n. Westminster Hall, Home, adv. To the very heart or

formerly the seat of the High root of the matter ; effectively, Court of Justice in England ; thoroughly. Fig. hence, the administration of Honesty, n. †Honour, credit, justici. 2. 3. 47

good name. 2. 5. 29. Halt, v. To walk lame, limp. Honorable, a. Pertaining to perEpilogue.

sons of rank or social distincHandle, n. Occasion, opportu- tion.

2. 6. 97. nity. Fig. 4. 7. 60.

Horary, a. [L. hora, hour.] Handsome, a. Appropriate, happy, Hourly. I. 6. 6. clever. 1. Ch. 4.

Hospital, n. An asylum for the Harrington, n. A brass farthing destitute, infirm, or aged. token, coined by John, Lord

em

2. Ex

4. 3. 18.

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