The Triumph of Augustan Poetics: English Literary Culture from Butler to Johnson

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The Triumph of Augustan Poetics offers an important and original reevaluation of the transition from Baroque to Augustan in English literature. Starting with Butler's outrageous burlesque, Hudibras, Blanford Parker describes the origins of Augustan satire and its momentous departure from the religious and social writing of an earlier era. He goes on to explain the creation, from the ruins of satire, of a new poetry of nature and everyday life (emerging most significantly in the work of Pope and Thomson), and the ambiguous or hostile responses of writers including Samuel Johnson.

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Contents

Introduction
3
Samuel Butler and the end of analogy
27
Transitional Augustan poetry
63
Pope and mature Augustanism
98
Thomson and the invention of the literal
138
The four poles of the Christian imagination in relation to Augustanism
176
The fideist reaction
198
Johnson and fideism
233
Index
252
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