Transactions of the ... Annual Meetings of the Kansas Academy of Science, Volume 12

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Vols. for 1881/82- include the Report of the secretary.
 

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Page 67 - Physiognomy is the science or knowledge of the correspondence between the external and internal man — the visible superficies and invisible contents. It is, properly so called, the observation of character at rest, which is displayed in the form and appearance of the movable parts while at rest. Character impassioned is manifested by the movable parts in motion.
Page 90 - These appearances, which are hero denominated 'ancient garden-beds/ indicate an earlier and more perfect system of cultivation than that which now prevails; for the present Indians do not appear to possess the ideas of taste and order necessary to enable them to arrange objects in consecutive rows. Traces of this kind of cultivation, though not very abundant, are found in several other parts of the State (Wisconsin).
Page 63 - QUANTITIES, AND THE RATIOS OF QUANTITIES, WHICH IN ANY FINITE TIME CONVERGE CONTINUALLY TO EQUALITY, AND BEFORE THE END OF THAT TIME APPROACH NEARER THE ONE TO THE OTHER THAN BY ANY GIVEN DIFFERENCE, BECOME ULTIMATELY EQUAL.
Page 80 - I have been unable to ascertain the time occupied in a single act of self-division, but supposing it to be completed in twenty-four hours, we should have, as the progeny of a single frustule, the amazing number of one thousand millions in a single month...
Page 47 - Lawrence, shows that the most notable meteorological features' of the year 1889 were the remarkable absence of extremes of heat and cold, resulting in a very mild winter and a...
Page 119 - July 27, last month, would say, that infected bugs were applied after they were kept with live ones about 42 hours. They were applied as follows: Most of the bugs mixed were dead when taken out of the box. They were applied in seven different hills, being put into every ninth hill. I marked every hill with a number so as to be better able to watch the progress. Examined after 48 hours' application, with the following results: No.
Page 23 - ... atmospheres squeezing the water out of the rock pores, and granting sufficient plasticity in the rock and a sufficient quantity of water, it must rise in the tube. which has only the pressure of one atmosphere upon it. A large bore to the well and a small supply of water would be against its reaching the surface. On the other hand, a bed-rock with mobile molecules at or near saturation under this enormous pressure must cause in a narrow tube a flowing well.
Page 120 - The following is a summary of the results of the field experiments in the season of 1890: Number of boxes of diseased bugs sent out, thirty-eight. Seven of these lots were either not received or received and not used. Reports were received from twenty-six of the thirty-one remaining cases. Of these, twenty-six reports three were unfavorable, nineteen favorable, and four doubtful concerning the success of the experiment. These doubtful cases are not to be looked upon as unfavorable, but more evidence...
Page 64 - Finite particles are not moments, but the very quantities generated by the moments. We are to conceive them as the just nascent principles of finite magnitudes.
Page 182 - No. 6. The Intrusive and Extrusive Triassic Trap Sheets of the Connecticut Valley, by Wm.

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