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The same subject

Offer of Kngland and France to assist the Tycoon agaiimt the daimio*. Hostilities probable. The Wyoming at Knnagnwa.

Tax "on American citizens

Destruction of the United States legation bv fire

Expiration of the time fixed for the reply to the British and French proposals.

Tlic proposed change in the location of the United States legation. Relations between the Mikado and Tycoon and between Japan and the treaty powers.

Removal of Mr. Pruyn to Yokohama. Death of one of the murderer* of Mr. lleusken.

Correspondence with the British and French ministers in regard to the destruction of the United States legation by fire.

Promised compliance of the Japanese government with the British demands.

Friendly proffers of places of residence from representatives of France and Prussia.

In*tractions to co-operate with representatives of other treaty powers. The Wyoming placed under the orders of Mr. Pruyn.

Communications between the dalmios and the Tycoou. Proclamations of Japanese authorities.

Circumstances connected with the burning of the United States legation.

The British indemnity not paid as agreed upon. Intercourse suspended. Hostilities imminent.

British indemnity paid. Foreign legations ordered by the Mikado to withdraw.

The orders of the Mikado and Tycoon for the closing of ports and removal of foreigners. Reply and protest of Mr. Pruyn.

The same subjects. The British and French replies..

The same subjects

Necessity of a ratification of the treaties by the Mikado. Suggestions in regard to military and naval movements.

Insecurity of life and property of foreigners residing in Japan. Action of United States representatives in regard to proceedings of Great Britain.

Instructions as to action iu view of the critical state of affairs between treaty powers in Japan.

Testimonials from the President to Japanese authorities In recognition of their kindness to shipwrecked Americans.

The acts of violence towards American citizens. Cooperation of the treaty powers.

Tax by the daimios on vessels of the United Suites, Holland, and Frauce. Proceedings of the Japanese government and diplomatic representatives in relation thereto.

Tbe same subject

Measures for the re-opeuing of the inland sea by the naval force of the treaty powers. Claims of the respective governments.

British demands for iudemnity and for the surrender of the murderers of Mr. Richardson. The attack at and expedition to Simonosekl.

Instructions in view of tbe destruction of the American legation by lire and in regard to its removal to Yokohama. The differences between the British government and that of Japan. The order of the Tycoon requiring foreigners to leave the empire, and the queHtions between Japan and the United States resulting therefrom.

The expediency of demanding a ratification of the treaties by the Mikado.

Acknowledgment of despatch

The attack on the American ship Pembroke. Proceedings of Mr. Pruyn and tbe United States shipof-war Wyoming.

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Reception of the diplomatic corps by the King on his

recovery.

Acknowledgment of information

The same subject

European opinion regnrding American affairs and projects of intervention. Depredations of the Alabama.

The same subjects. The military situation

The conirrossional resolutions concerning foreign intervention.

The capitalization of the Scheldt dues

The progress of military operations and gradual decline of the power of the insurrection.

Projects of recognition and intervention

Audience of the King to deliver the letter of the President in regard to the award in the case of the Moconian.

Proceedings in regard to William Cornell Jewott

The progress of the war. Conversation with the King.

The use of incendiary shells at Charleston

Approval of proceedings of Mr. Sanford. Progress of the war.

TURKEY.

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Subject

The ease of the mnrder of American missionaries. Culture of cotton in the Turkish empire. Establishment of a censorship on books and newspaper*.

The censorship. The concession of the right of holding real estate to foreigners. Commercial regulations. The sentence of the assassins of the Rev. Mr. Me nam.

Reply of tho Turkish government in regard to the concession to foreigners of the right of holding real estate. Case of the American consulate at Beirut. Proposed government bank iu Turkey. Insecurity of life and property.

Sentence of the assassins of the Rev. Mr. Meriam. The Sultan's health. Political affuirs in Greece.

Communication to the Minister of Foreign Affairs of the President's congratulations on the restoration of order in the Turkish provinces. Friendly declarations of the Turkish government. The sentence of the assassins of the Rev. Mr. Meriam.

Fiscal condition of the Turkish empire. Culture of cotton.

The concession to foreigners of the right to hold real estate. Sentence of the assassins of the Rev. Mr.

Mt-riam.

Sentence of the assassins of the Rev. Mr. Meriam

Concession to foreigners of tho right to hold real

estate.

Prosecution of Turkish assassins of American missionaries.

International postal regulations. Arrest of another assassin of the Rev. Mr. Merium.

Transmitting letter of the Secretary of th« American Board of Foreign Missions In regard to the punishment of assassins of the Rev. Mr. Meriam.

Execution of assassins of tho Rev. Mr,
Ministerial changes in Turkey.

Ministerial changes in the Turkish government

Protection asked for American missionaries,
other assassins of the Rev. Mr. Meriam.

Customs reforms in Turkey. The politienl
In Europe.

The

DENMARK.

DESPATCHES.

Mr. Seward to Mr. Wood

do

Mr. Wood to Mr. Seward

Mr. Seward to Mr. Wood
Mr. Wood to Mr. Seward

do

Mr. Seward to Mr. Wood

Mr. Wood to Mr. Seward

Mr. Seward to Mr. Wood

do

Mr. Wood to Mr. Seward

1862. Nov. 17 Nov. 18

1863. Jan. 5

Jan. 17
Jan. SO
Jan. 37

Feb. 18

April 14

June 13

Sept. 22

Oct. 20

Presentation of American pistol* to the King

Emissaries of the insurgents in Denmark and Sweden

Audience with tho King. Presentation of American pistols.

Intercepted treasonable correspondence

The President'* proclamation of emancipation

The Hamburg International Kxhibition. Imperfect information regarding the United States in Europe.

Acknowledgment of despatches. The Hamburg Exhibition.

Resolutions of Congress In regard to foreign Intervention.

Acknowledgment of despatches

The military situation

Falsehoods circulated in regard to affairs in the United States.

EGYPT.

No. From whom and to whom.

DESPATCHES.

83 Mr. Thayer to Mr. Seward .

16 Mr. Seward to Mr, Thayer . 25 Mr. Thayer to Mr. Seward .

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Subject.

The cultivation of cotton in Egypt. Projected railway between Cairo and the Red Sea. Public sentiment in tbe east in regard to American affaire.

The cotton crop. The Suez canaL Steamers build* lng in England for the Viceroy. Foreign travel in Egypt. Death of Mohammed Habitat.

The European press, and influences brought to bear npon it by emissaries of tbe insurgents.

Celebration of the opening of the Isthmus canal. Steam communication with European porta. Proposed re-establishment of the port of Berenice, on the Red Sea.

The cotton supply. The proposed railway from Cairo to the Red Sea, Reciprocal good wishes between the government of Egypt and of the United States.

The cotton supply. The Suez canal

Reported transportation by the French government of blacks from Egypt to Mexico for military service. Death of Said Pacha. Reception of the consular corps by the new Viceroy, Ismail Pacha.

Disturbances between native and foreign-born residents of Egypt Reception of a deputation of American clergymen and missionaries by the Pacha, Present condition and resources of Egypt

Acknowledgment of despatches and approval of proceedings.

The accession of Ismail Pacha

The reception of American clergymen and missionaries by the Viceroy.

Visit of Sultan Abdul Aziz to Egypt

Conventions made by the Viceroy with the Suez Canal Company. Prospects of the canal, and views of European governments in regard to it

Arrival of Captains Spckc and Grant from their expedition to discover the source of the Nile. The Suez canal.

The Sultan's visit to Egypt

The Suez canal

The expedition to the sources of the Nile and the results of the discovery.

Destructive murrain among Egyptian cattle. Visit of Prince Napoleon to Egypt.

Cotton culture in Egypt

Page.

1101

1102

1104 1103

1106

1107 1107

1109

1111

1112 1112

1112 1114

1116

1122 11--2 1122

1133

1125

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MEXICO—Continued.

From whom and to whom.

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Subject

The exportation of munitions of war and of mules
mid wagons from the United States.

The military situation In Mexico

The siege of Puebla. Purchase of mules and wagons
by the French.

The case of the Noe-Daquy

The purchase in the United States of munitions of
war by the iH-lligerouts of Mexico.

Case of the Noe-Duq«y

Complaints in regard to Mexican citizens resident in
Texas and New Mexico.

Case of the Noe-Daquy

The same subject

The exportation of arms, mules, and wagons from tht;
United States to Mexico. Communications with
the diplomatic corpB in Mexico in regard to protec-
tion of foreign subject* residents In Mexico.

European intervention in American affairs. The
neutrality of the Isthmus of Panama,

The same subjects

do

Case of the Xoe-Daquy

Exportation of arms, munitions of war, and mules
and wagons from the United States to Mexico.
Siege of Puebla.

Exportations to Mexico. The protection of foreign
subjects by diplomatic representatives.

The military situation In Mexico

Alleged impressments of Mexican citizens into the
military service of the United States.

Illicit traffic across the Mexicnn frontier

The surrender of Pueblo. Military operations

The position of the American legation In Mexico

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BRAZIL.

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Relations between British and European powers.
Insurgent vessels in Rio de Janeiro.

Progress of affairs in the United States

The I*rt; si dent's proclamation of emancipation

The same subject

Correspondence with the Marquis d'Abrantes, In re-
ference to the proceedings of the Alabama at Fer-
nando de Noronha, and the action of the Brazilian
local nutiiorities.

Piratical depredations and movements of the Ala-
bama, Georgia, and Florida, and their visits to
Brazilian ports.

The Mime subject

The same subject. The interruption of diplomatic
intercourse between Bruzil and Great Britain.

Movements and depredations of the pirates Alabama,
Florida, and Georgia.

The same subject

The same subject

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