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The policy of the European powers in regard to American affairs. Condition of the Netherlands.

European project* of intervention

Financial measures of the L'uited States government..

European projects of intervention

Information in regard to European systems of collecting revenues.

Financial measures of the United 8tates government. European opinions in regard to American affairs

The President's proclamation of emancipation

Acknowledgment of Information

The same ,

European opinions of American affairs

Progress of affairs In the United States

Change in the cabinet of Holland. Opinions in Europe on American questions.

Information In regard to European systems of collecting revenue. Financial measures of the United Stutes.

European interests as affected by the war. Consequent effects upon opinion.

Increasing confidence in American securities. Proposed financial measures. The employment of colored troops.

Close of the Bession of Congress

Condition of nffairs in the United States. Impossibility of conforming the policy of the government to views and wishes of European statesmen.

Financial measures of the United States government.

Concurrent resolutions of Congress conce ruing foreign Intervention.

The improbability of European intervention

Growth of popular confidence and favorable change

in public opinion. Investments in United States stocks by European

capitalists.

Acknowledgment of Information

The proposed postal convention at Paris. State of

European opinion of affairs in the United States. The same subject Acknowledgment of despatches,

medal, &c.

The Scheldt dues. The Polish question. Tho military movements in Louisiana. The game subjects

NETHERLANDS—Continued.

No.

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From whom and to whom.

Mr. Piko to Mr. Seward..

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Subject

Condition of Holland. European opinion! of the probable result of the American content.

The military situation

The interview of Messrs. Roebuck and Lindsay with tho Emperor of the French. The Alexandra case. Opinions dependent ou the success of military operation*.

Acknowledgment of information

The military situation

Fluctuations of opinion created by military events. Ministerial crisis in the Netherlands.

The effect of the news of the successes at Gettysburg and Vicksburg.

The validity of rogatory commissions of foreign magistrates in the Netherlands.

The Polish question. Favorable change In opinion regarding American affairs.

Progress of affairs in the United States

Acknowledgment of despatches

European political affairs

Discouragement of sympathizers with tho insurgents. The Mexican question.

The Frankfort conference. The Mexican question..

Progress of affairs in the United States. Condition of affairs in Mexico.

Acknowledgment of information

Foreign opinions concerning the insurrection

Page.

CHINA.

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Interview with Prince Kung. Conversation in regard to relations between the United States and China. State of Chinese affairs.

Correspondence with Prince Kung. The consulates of the United States at the treaty ports.

National flag adopted by the Chinese government

Acknowledgment of despatches

Regulations for trade in the river Yangtsze

Case of the American bark Agnes

Correspondence with the Chinese government in regard to consuls fn tho treaty ports.

The case of the American bark Agnes

Letter of the Emperor of China to the President of the United Suites.

The adoption of a national flag by tho Chinese govern men t.

The consuls at the treaty ports

The death of General Ward

The organization of the legation, and the consular establishment in China.

Regulations for trade

The case of the bark Agnes

Tho consuls at tho treaty ports ,

The case of the bark Agnes

Proposed cession of a portion of the city of Ningpo to the French. Opposed by tho British and American representatives.

The municipal government of Shanghai

Arrival of Colonel Raasloff, the Danish charge*

Recommendation of the appointment of a consul general at Shanghai.

Denial by the Chinese government of the pretence that steamers building in England are Intended for China,

Co-operation of the representatives of the treaty Powers in China,

Correspondence with the Russian minister on his departure from Peking.

The case of General Burgevine

The opening of a now gate In the walls of Shanghai, and the improvement of its sanitary condition.

Extension of the time in which to re-export native produce.

Correspondence with Prince Wittgenstein as to tho waiver of the time within which a Prussian minister cannot by existing treaties reside in Peking.

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Subject. Page.

Conclusion of a treaty between China and Denmark..1 P^O

Approval of proceeding* of Mr. Burlingame t p^l

The mnnicipol arrangement for the government of fegl Shanghai.

The mission of Colonel Knasloff, the Danish charge 681 d'affaires.

Modification of the treaty of Jnne 18 l&W FS2

The steamers purchased iu England for the Emperor bed of China.

The policy of co-operation between diplomatic repre- c**.l

wntntives of western Powers in China.

Approval of proceeding* of Mr. Burlingame ffel

Acknowledgment of the autograph letter of the Em* .-SI

peror of China to the President of the United States.

Acknowledgment of despatches and approval of pro- t-.c:l

ct-edings.

The same f tfl

The Danish treaty with China IM

The same subject. Thanks of tile Danish govern- fc^4 luent for the assistance rendered by Mr. Burlingame.

SPAIN.

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Official reception by tbe Qieen and the miuit-tcr of

foreign affairs. Etfects of the war upon slavery. Spanish interest in

the question.

The prohibition of American vessel s-of-war at Havana

from communicating with the ihore. Proceedings of Spanish vessels-of-war at New Orleans

The admission of the pirate Florida into the port of Havana. The stopping of the United States despatch-boat Keancy by a Spanish frigate.

Proce<*diiig>i of Spanish vessels at Now Orleans. Rescinding of the order forbidding United States shipsof-war to communicate with the port of Havana.

The admission of the pirate Florida into port at the Havana, and stoppage of the United States despatch-boat Reunev by a Spanish frigate. Change iu the ministry in Spain.

The prohibition of United States vessels-of-war from communicating with Havana.

The same subject, and the stoppage of the United States despatch-boat Reaney by a Spanish frigate. Correspondence with the Marquis of Miruflores.

Conversation with the Marquis of Miratiorea on the nature and objects of the insurrection. The new ministry in Spain. Note in regard to the admission of the Florida at Huvana and tbe stopping of the Reaney.

The prohibition of United States ships-of-war from communicating with Havana. The postal conference at Paris. Blockade runner* at tbe Canary islands.

The case of tbe Reaney. Address of citizens of Barcelona to the President in regard to the proclamation of emancipation.

The military situation

A suspicious steamer under the Chinese flag at Teneriffe.

Acknowledgment of information

The effect in Europe of news of military successes of the United States government.

Tbe intrigues of the insurgents for recognition by Spain. Question of maritime jurisdiction.

European discussions of projects of reeognition

Reported disavowal by the Spanish government of any design to recognize the intargents. The question of maritime Jurisdiction.

The military situation. The New York riot subdued.

The assurance given by the Spanish government of its adherence to the policy of withholding recognition from tbe tnsurgeuts. Relations of slavery to the insurrection.

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Events in Mexico

Quarantine regulations at Now Orleans

The game subject

Complaint of alleged proceedings of Spanish vesselsof-war at New Orleans.

The same subject

The prohibition of Spanish vessel s-of-war from passing above the forts at New Orleans.

Protest against censnrcs of the action of the Spanish

consul in regard to affairs at Charleston.

The same subject

The prohibition of United States vessels-of-war from

communicating with Havana. Explanations in reference to asylum given to political

refugees on board Spanish vesBels-of-war at New

Orleans.

The proceedings of the Spanish vessels-of-war at New Orleans.

The samo subject

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The policy of emancipation and its effects upon European opinion.

The case of the Essex. Acknowledgment of manifestations of friendly feeling by the government of Prussia.

The proclamation of emancipation

The cases of persons naturalized in the United States returning to Europe to avoid military duty, and then claiming the protection of tho United States government

The joint resolutions of Congress on the wbject of

foreign Intervention. Claims of exemption from military service abroad by

persons who are evading military service at borne.

Political events in Prussia

Military successes of the United States government..

The same subject

The outbreak In New York

Claimants for exemption from military service

The congress of German sovereigns at Frankfort ... The statistical congress. Arrival of Mr. lluggles.

The congress of sovereigns at Frankfort

The congress of sovereigns at Frankfort

The military situation ■ JAPAN.

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A new minister of foreign affairs appointed. Hostility toward* foreigners on the part of the people.

Correspondence with the British charge d'affaires

Cordial relations existing between the ministers of Great Britain, France and the United States, In Japan. Disaster to the French steamer Dordagne.

Proposuls of the Japanese government to have persons instructed at the American legation in the English language, in order to facilitate diplomatic business.

Another attnck on the British legation. Murder of two sentinels. Proceedings of the Japanese authorities.

nstruction of Japanese officials in the English language at the American legation. Duties on articles used in the preparation of teas for export.

The murder of the guards of the British legation

Withdrawal of the British charge d'affaires from Yedo to Yokohama.

Beception of Mr. Pruyn. Communication to the minister of foreign affairs.

The postponement of the exercise of the treaty right of American citizens to reside in Yedo, and of the opening of certain ports.

The return of a sword stolen from the Japanese envoys while in Baltimore,

Result of the investigation made by the Japanese authorities in reference to the attack on the British legation.

The relations between the ministers of Great Britain, France, and the United States in Japan.

Outrage by retainers of the Prince of Satsuma. Murder of Mr. Richardson. f

The change In the Japanese department of foreign affairs.

The Japanese pupils at the legation of the United States.

The withdrawal of diplomatic representatives of other

powers from Yedo. Relations between the Japanese government and the

legation of the United States. The attack on the British legation and murder of two

sentinels.

The postponement of the stipulated opening of additional ports.

The outrage by the retaluers of the Prince of Satsuma.

Loss of the American bnrk Chevalier on the const of Japan; kindness of the Japanese to the officers and crew. Proffer of aid of a steamer by the French minister.

Threatened attack on the foreign legations

The murder of two British sailors. Demands of the

British government. Murder of Mr. Richardson.

Approval of proceedings of Mr. Pruyn

The attack on the British legation

Approval of the course of Mr. Pruyn

The attack on the British legation '.

Hostile feeling against foreigners. Removal of the

legations proposed by the Japanese authorities.

Letter from the Mikado to the Tycoon ordering tho

expulsion of foreignors.

The loss of the American bark Chevalier

Demands of the British government. Tho Tycoou

summoned by the Mikado. Threatening aspect of

affairs.

Tho attack on the British legation

The visit of the Tycoon to the Mikado

The punishment of the persons concerned in the attack on the British legation.

The British demands and the reply of the Japanese governmnnt. Interposition of the American minister invoked by the Japanese authorities.

The same subjects

Correspondence with the British and French ministers. Proffered aid to the Tycoon. Measures of coercion to be resorted to by the British and French fleets.

Negotiations between the British and French ministers and the Japanese ministers of foreign affairs.

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