The American Union Speaker: Containing Standard and Recent Selections in Prose and Poetry, for Recitation and Declamation, in Schools, Academies and Colleges : with Introductory Remarks on Elocution, and Explanatory Notes

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Thompson, Brown, 1875 - Readers - 536 pages
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Contents

The Foundation of National Greatness W E Channing
17
Intemperance W E Channing
18
Inconsistent Expectations Mrs Barbauld
19
The Patriots Sword vindicated T F Meagher
21
On being found Guilty of Treason T F Meagher
23
Address to the American Troops at L I Washington
24
Character of Chatham H Grattan
25
The Press and the Union R Choate
27
American Literature and the Union R Choute
28
The Love of Reading R Choate
29
Eloquence of the American Revolution R Choate
30
Tribute to Webster R Choate
32
Skilful Labor and Cultivated Intellect R Choate
33
The Empire of Mind R Choate
35
The City of our Liberty R Choate
36
Specimen of the Eloquence of James Otis Mrs L M Child
37
Webster in the Dartmouth College Case G S Hillard
38
The Ambition of Webster G S Hillard
39
The Danger of Exclusive Devotion to Business G S Hillard
40
Speech in the Convention of Delegates of Virginia P Henry
41
The Perfect Orator
42
The Same Concluded P Henry
43
Reply to the Duke of Grafton Lord Thurlow
44
Cćsars Pause upon the Rubicon
45
In Prospect of War Robert Hall
46
The American Indians J Story
47
Classical Learning J Story
48
An Appeal to the Loyalty of South Carolina
49
The Same Concluded
50
Burr and Blennerhassett
51
Cause for Indian Resentment
52
Speech on the British Treaty
53
Speech against a Libeller
54
New England and the Union
55
On sending Relief to Ireland
56
The New England Common School
57
Christianity the Source of Reform
58
Northern Laborers
59
Broughams Attack on Canning described
60
South Carolina during the Revolution
61
Incompetency of Parliament
62
Washington
63
Education
64
Character of Napoleon Bonaparte
65
A Collision of Vices
66
Measures not Men
67
Parliamentary Reform
68
Denunciation of Slavery
69
The Teachers of Mankind
70
The Greatness of Washington
71
Washington a Man of Genius
72
Irish Aliens and English Victories
73
The Iliad and the Bible
74
On admitting California into the Union
75
A Highway to the Pacific
76
Address to Polish Exiles in London
77
Kossuth on his Credentials
78
Eulogy on OConnell
79
National Bankruptcy
80
A Tribute to Massachusetts
81
Robespierres Last Speech
82
The Mayflower and the Pilgrims
83
The Discovery of America
84
Adams and Jefferson
85
The Indian Chief to the White Settler
86
The Men of SeventySix
87
The Same Concluded
88
Our Common Schools
89
Websters greatest Parliamentary Effort
90
What Good will the Monument
91
Emancipation of the Catholics of Ireland
92
The Public Informer
93
Red Jackets Speech to the Missionary
94
Partition of Poland
95
National Disgrace 97 A Political Pause 98 Washingtons Sword and Franklins Staff 99 The Right of Petition by Woman W Wirt W Wirt F Ames Griff...
96
Sheil
98
Dr Wayland
100
Scorn to be Slaves
101
W H Seward
102
T H Benton
103
Kossuth L Kossuth
104
The Abolition of the Slave Trade
105
Let there be Light
106
W H Seward
107
Mirabeau
108
Sumner Robespierre
109
Supposed Speech of John Adams
110
The Same Concluded
111
E Everett E Everett E Everett E Everett E Everett E Everett E Everett E Everett E Everett
112
Public Opinion
113
The Murderers Secret
114
The Same Concluded
115
Defence of American Clergymen
116
Peaceable Secession impossible
117
Liberty and Union
118
Events Great because of their Results
119
The Future of America
120
Liberty of Speech
121
Washington to the Present Generation
122
The Platform of the Constitution
123
J P Curran J P Curran
124
Reply to the Reflections of Mr Walpole
125
Speech against the American
126
Cram
127
J Fox C J Fox C J
128
The Noblest Public Virtue
129
Plea for the Union
130
National Glory
131
J Q Adams J Q Adams
132
Hamlets Address to the Players
133
Falstaffs Description of his Soldiers
134
PAGE
135
Death of Hamilton
136
Invective against Mr Flood
137
Reply to Mr Corry
138
Speech of Titus Quinctius to the Romans
139
The Boston Massacre
140
Enterprise of New England
141
The Right of England to Tax America
142
Description of Junius
143
True Statesmanship
144
The Queen of France and the Spirit of Chivalry
145
Peroration of Opening Speech against Hastings
146
Peroration of Closing Speech against Hastings
147
The Crisis of the Nation
148
Queen Elizabeth 152 The Free Press 149 Extract from Demosthenes
149
Extract from Demosthenes on the Crown
150
The Liberty of the Press
153
British Tyranny in India
154
Shakspeare Shakspeare Shakspeare Shakspeare
180
A Psalm of Life
183
Dr Nott
184
H Grattan H Grattan
186
The Three Beats
189
Anonymous John Hancock
190
E Burke E Burke E Burke E Burke E Burke E Burke E Burke
192
Chamouni
197
Cicero Demosthenes Demosthenes
200
J Mackintosh J Mackintosh
204
Lord Erskine Lord Erskine
207
Thanatopsis
208
H Grattan
209
Mason
210
WarSong of the Greeks 1822
217
Marco Bozzaris
223
PAGE
225
The Bell of the Atlantic
229
W Cowper
233
Catiline on his Banishment
235
136
236
Hamlets Soliloquy
241
J G Lockhart
242
Wolsey on being cast off by the King
247
J Lawrence
249
The Same Continued
253
W Cowper
257
The Higher
259
Curtis G W 373 387 388 390 403
262
Goodrich C
268
J S Knowles
270
S T Coleridge
277
W Collins
285
J Pierpont
291
T Campbell
300
Pleading Extraordinary
308
Fuss at Fires
309
Mr Pepperages Peroration
310
Fourth of July Oration
311
Mark Twain on European Guides
312
The Duel
313
Music for the Million
314
Ode to my Boy aged Three Years
315
The Height of the Ridiculous
316
The September Gale
317
Washington and Lincoln
318
The Removal
319
Nongtongpaw
320
The Swells Soliloquy on the
321
The Alarmed Skipper
322
The ColdWater
323
Whittling
324
Hotspurs Account of a
325
How to have what we Like
326
The Three Black Crows
327
Helps to Read
328
The Throes of Science
329
Hamilton G Miss Dodge
333
The Letter
337
The Frenchmans Lesson
338
How to Tell Bad News
339
The Choleric Father
340
Rolla and Alonzo
341
The English Traveller
342
The Embryo Lawyer
343
R Choate
356
J Bright
364
A Lincoln
372
Public Rumor R H Dana Jr
375
The Education of the War G Putnam
377
Washingtons Birthday February 22 1864 G Putnam
378
Our Heroic Dead J A Andrew
380
Honor to our Heroes J A Andrew
381
Limit to Human Dominion L Swain
383
The Commencement of the AntiSlavery Move
384
ment W Phillips
385
Convention A H Stephens
387
Patriotism G W Curtis
388
Ideas the Life of a People G W Curtis
390
American BattleFlags Carl Schurz
391
Manhood and Country before Wealth and Lux ury O W Holmes
393
Our Countrys Greatest Glory Bishop Whipple
394
Our National Anniversary A H Rice
396
James Otis C Sumner
397
The Reconstruction of Louisiana N P Banks
398
The Bible Its Influence T Parker
400
The Bible Its Deep and Lasting Power T Parker
401
The Perpetuity of the Union D S Dickinson
402
Samuel Adams G W Curtis
403
Heroism of the Minute Men at Lexington R H Dana Jr
405
Our Countrys Call W C Bryant
408
Not Yet W C Bryant
410
The American Flag G W Curtis
411
Lexington 1875 J G Whittier
413
The Massachusetts Line R Lowell
416
On the Shores of Tennessee E L Beers
417
A BattleSong for Freedom Gail Hamilton
419
The Voice of the North J G Whittier
421
The Watchers J G Whittier
422
Barbara Frietchie J G Whittier
424
Fall of the Indian Heroes Joaquin Miller
426
Union and Liberty 0 W Holmes
429
Sheridans Ride T B Read
430
The Execution of Montrose W E Aytoun
432
The Face against the Pane T B Aldrich
435
HUMOROUS SELECTIONS PROSE
439
Plea of Sergeant Buzfuz in Bardel vs Pick wick C Dickens
441
Mr Puffs Account of Himself R B Sheridan
444
Lyceum Speech of Mr Orator Climax Anonymous
445
Bullum vs Boatum G A Stevens
447
F Brown
454
Clemens
458
Hood T 242 245 459 461
459
T Hood T Hood T Hood O W Holmes O W Holmes Anonymous Anonymous C Dibdin Vanity Fair J T Fields J G Saxe J Pierpont Shakspeare STAN...
461
503
475
F Bret Harte
485
E W Palmer
486
Shakspeare Shakspeare Shakspeare Anonymous Dr Aiken Fielding Anonymous Anonymous Anonymous R B Sheridan R B Sheridan
493
12
522
80
524
114
525
127
526
131
527
144
528
174
529
210
530
G W Patten
532
355
535
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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 341 - Ingratitude, more strong than traitors' arms, Quite vanquished him : then burst his mighty heart ; And, in his mantle muffling up his face, Even at the base of Pompey's statue, Which all the while ran blood, great Caesar fell.
Page 218 - As home his footsteps he hath turned, From wandering on a foreign strand ? If such there breathe, go mark him well ; For him no minstrel raptures swell ; High though his titles, proud his name, Boundless his wealth as wish can claim ; Despite those titles, power, and pelf, The wretch concentered all in self, Living, shall forfeit fair renown, And, doubly dying, shall go down To the vile dust from whence he sprung, Unwept, unhonored, and unsung.
Page 179 - Be not too tame, neither, but let your own discretion be your tutor; suit the action to the word, the word to the action; with this special observance, that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature; for anything so overdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end, both at the first and now, was and is to hold, as 'twere, the mirror up to nature; to show virtue her own feature, scorn her own image, and the very age and body of the time his form and pressure.
Page 219 - Eske River where ford there was none: But ere he alighted at Netherby gate The bride had consented, the gallant came late: For a laggard in love, and a dastard in war Was to wed the fair Ellen of brave Lochinvar. So boldly he...
Page 178 - Who is here so base, that would be a bondman ? If any, speak ; for him have I offended. Who is here so rude, that would not be a Roman ? If any, speak ; for him have I offended. Who is here so vile, that will not love his country ? If any, speak ; for him have I offended. I pause for a reply.
Page 348 - The letter, as I live, with all the business I writ to his holiness. Nay, then, farewell ! I have touch'd the highest point of all my greatness ; And, from that full meridian of my glory, I haste now to my setting : I shall fall Like a bright exhalation in the evening, And no man see me more.
Page 209 - O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave? On the shore, dimly seen through the mists of the deep, Where the foe's haughty host in dread silence reposes, What is that which the breeze, o'er the towering steep, As it fitfully blows, now conceals, now discloses?
Page 347 - tis not to me she speaks: Two of the fairest stars in all the heaven, Having some business, do entreat her eyes To twinkle in their spheres, till they return. What if her eyes were there, they in her head; The brightness of her cheek would shame those stars, As daylight doth a lamp; her eye in heaven Would through the airy region stream so bright, That birds would sing, and think it were not night. See, how she leans her cheek upon her hand! O, that I were a glove upon that hand, That I might touch...
Page 292 - When thou art gone, the solemn brood of care Plod on, and each one, as before, will chase His favorite phantom; yet all these shall leave Their mirth and their employments, and shall come And make their bed with thee. As the long train Of ages...
Page 335 - There was a sound of revelry by night. And Belgium's capital had gathered then Her beauty and her chivalry ; and bright The lamps shone o'er fair women and brave men : A thousand hearts beat happily ; and when Music arose with its voluptuous swell, Soft eyes looked love to eyes which spake again ; And all went merry as a marriage-bell, But hush ! hark ! a deep sound strikes like a rising knell.

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