The Fragmentation of the Proper Name and the Crisis of Degree: Deconstructing King Lear

Front Cover
LIT Verlag Münster, 2004 - Literary Criticism - 132 pages

This is a rich interpretation of a rich text. Ben Amara provides a twenty-first century reading of a timeless masterpiece, and in so doing he can point to the relationship of death and desire as playing both with body and language. He delights in confronting his readers with the ineluctable patterns which language and time inscribe within the open/closed Shakespearean space: Degree, division, and diversity as the focal points. Emphasis upon the corporeality of the human body concatenates this study's textual interpretation with the corpus of the literary canon, itself seen as a body divided by performance and differed by reading. It is also true that [this] prevails over the damaging engagement with the deconstructed text and dominates the conflictual tendencies of the reconstructed drama."--Christopher Mulvery, King Alfred's College, Wincester, England

Radhouan Ben Amara has a Ph.D. in comparative literature from Washington University in the United States. He is professor of French at the University of Cagliari in Italy and also teaches English and English literature at Martini's High Institute in Cagliari.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

III
5
V
35
VII
109

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 9 - The heavens themselves, the planets, and this centre, Observe degree, priority, and place, Insisture, course, proportion, season, form, Office, and custom, in all line of order...
Page 10 - Lear. Meantime we shall express our darker purpose. — Give me the map there. — Know that we have divided In three our kingdom : and 'tis our fast intent To shake all cares and business from our age ; Conferring them on younger strengths, while we Unburden'd crawl toward death. — Our son of Cornwall, And you, our no less loving son of Albany, We have this hour a constant will to publish Our daughters' several dowers, that future strife May be prevented now.
Page 7 - tis fittest. Cor. How does my royal lord? How fares your majesty? Lear. You do me wrong, to take me out o' the grave. — Thou art a soul in bliss ; but I am bound Upon a wheel of fire, that mine own tears Do scald like molten lead.

About the author (2004)

Radhouan Ben Amara is professor of French at the University of Cagliari in Italy. He also teaches English and English literature at Martini's High Institute in Cagliari.

Bibliographic information