Travels in the south of Spain, in letters written A.D. 1809 and 1810, Volume 1

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J. Johnson and Company, and W. Miller, 1811 - Spain - 443 pages

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Page 331 - Exegi monumentum aere perennius Regalique situ pyramidum altius, Quod non imber edax, non Aquilo impotens Possit diruere aut innumerabilis Annorum series et fuga temporum.
Page 14 - ... keep a much greater number of domestic servants than families of the same description in England. In their dress and personal ornaments both the men and women are very extravagant, especially the latter ; and I am told that the money expended on a lady's silk stockings and shoes alone (for they never walk out twice in the same) is enormous. Cadiz market, observes the same writer, was excessively crowded, especially the fish and vegetable markets ; the latter was supplied with a surprising profusion...
Page 8 - The view on entering the bay of Cadiz presents the finest collection of objects that can be conceived : on one extremity of the left point is situated the town of Rota, a little farther the castle of Santa Catalina and the neat city of Santa Maria ; at a greater distance, on the lap of a lofty hill, stands Medina ; nearer the sea the town of Puerto Real and the arsenal of the Carracas ; and on the extremity of the right hand point of land the city of Cadiz.
Page 9 - I am much afraid, from what I have seen of the proceedings of the Central Junta, that in the distributions of their forces they do not consider military defence and military operations, so much as they do political intrigue and the attainment of trifling political objects.
Page 85 - ... with images and pictures, the massy silver and gold ornaments, and the rails of bronze, tastefully designed, compose a most impressive whole. The priests kneeling before the altar, and in silence offering up their devotions, the clouds of ascending incense, and the pious on their knees, in the...
Page 95 - I with ac sho syml und< forw thei tio anc one of the last victims in this city was Olavide, a most respectable man, who applied the wealth he had acquired in South America, to the patriotic purpose of cultivating the Sierra Morena, with a number of German settlers, and to adorning and improving the public walks of the city, as well as the wharfs on the banks of the Guadalquivir. He had read the writings of some of the French unbelievers, and was suspected of having...
Page 82 - The garden of the Alcazar is said to have been laid out by the Moors, and is preserved in its original state ; it contains walks paved •with marble, parterres laid out with ever-greens, and well shaded with orange trees. In many parts of it there are baths, supplied by marble fountains from...
Page 335 - ... their meal at noon, which is so general that the towns and villages appear quite deserted from one till four o'clock. The labours of the artificer, and the attention of the shopkeeper, are suspended during those hours ; and the doors and windows of the latter are as closely shut as at night, or on a holyday.
Page 9 - ... military defence and military operations, so much as they do political intrigue, and the attainment of trifling political objects. They wish to strengthen the Army of Venegas, not because it is necessary or desirable on military grounds, but because they think the Army, as an instrument of mischief, safer in his hands than in those of another ; and they leave 12,000 men in Estremadura, not because more are not or may not be deemed necessary...
Page 81 - The outside of the Alcazar is miserable in its appearance ; but the first court, after entering the gate has a very grand effect : the front, looking into that court, is purely Arabic in its style, and the inscriptions...

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