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Article IV.

His Majesty, the Emperor of all the Eussias shall appoint, with convenient despatch, an agent or agents for the purpose of A &c formally delivering to a similar agent or agents, appointed on behalf of the United States, the territory, dominion, property, dependencies, and appurtenances which are ceded as above, and for doing any other act which may be necessary in regard thereto. But the cession, with the right of immediate possession, is never- 0,.„i010 br all. theless to be deemed complete and absolute on the exchange "olM"of ratifications, without waiting for such formal delivery.

Article V.

Immediately after the exchange of the ratifications of this convention, any fortifications or military posts which may be in the ceded territory shall be delivered to the agent of the United States, and any Eussiau troops which may be in the territory shall be withdrawn as soon as may be reasonably and conveniently practicable.

Article VI.

lu consideration of the cession aforesaid, the United States agree to pay at the Treasury in Washington, within ten mouths after the exchange of the ratifications of this convention, to the diplomatic representative or other agent of His Majesty the Emperor of all the Eussjas, duly authorized to receive the same, seven million two hundred thousand dollars in gold. The cession of territory TritorTded« and dominion herein made is hereby declared to be free S,"^"TMS^"nv,' and unincumbered by any reservations, privileges, fran- rTM><i'»«. chises, grants, or possessions, by any associated companies, whether corporate or incorporate, Eussiau or any other, or by any parties, except merely private individual property-holders; and the cession hereby made conveys all the rights, franchises, and privileges now belonging to Eussia iu the said territory or dominion, and appurtenances thereto.

Article VII.

When this convention shall have been duly ratified by the President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, on the one part, and, on the other, by His Maj- 1 esty the Emperor of all the Eussias, the ratifications shall be exchanged at Washington within three mouths from the date hereof, or sooner if possible.

In faith whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed this convention, and thereto affixed the seals of their arms. ;"

Done at Washington the thirtieth day of March, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-seven.

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RUSSIA, 18C8.

ARTICLE RESPECTING TRADE-MARKS, ADDITIONAL TO THE TREATY OF NAVIGATION AND COMMERCE BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND RUSSIA, OF THE 18th OF DECEMBER, 1832. CONCLUDED AT WASHINGTON JANUARY 27, 1SC.8; RATIFICATIONS EXCHANGED SEPTEMBER 21, 1868; PROCLAIMED OCTOBER 15, 1808.

The United States of America and bis Majesty the Emperor of all the Russias, deeming it advisable that there should be an additional article to the treaty of commerce between them of the T6g December, 1S32, have for this purpose named as their Plenipotentiaries, the President of the United States, William H. Seward, Secretary of State, and His Majesty the Emperor of all the Russias, the Privy Councillor, Edward de Stoeckl, accredited as his Envoy Extraordinaiy aud Minister Plenipotentiary to the United States;

And the said Plenipotentiaries, after an examination of their respective full powers, which were found to be in good aud due form, have agreed to and signed the following:

ADDITIONAL ARTICLE.

The high contracting parties, desiring to secure complete and efficient protection to the manufacturing industry of their respective citizens aud subjects, agree that any counterfeiting in one of the two countries of the trade-marks affixed in the other on merchandize, to show its origin aud quality, shall be strictly prohibited and repressed, aud shall give ground for an action of damages in favor of the injured party, to be prosecuted in the courts of the country iu which the counterfeit shall be proven.

The trade-marks in which the citizens or subjects of one of the two countries may wish to secure the right of property iu the other, must be lodged exclusively, to wit, the marks of citizens of the United States in the Department of Manufactures aud Inland Commerce at St. Petersburg, and the marks of Russian subjects at the Patent-Office in 'Washington.

This additional article shall be terminable by either party, pursuant to the twelfth article of the treaty to which it is an addition. It shall be ratified by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate of the United States, and by His Majesty the Emperor of all the Russias, and the respective ratifications of tlie same shall be exchanged at St. Petersburg within nine months from the date hereof, or sooner if possible.

In faith whereof tbe respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the present additional article in duplicate, and affixed thereto the seal of their arms.

Done at Washington the twenty-seventh day of January, in the year of Grace one thousand eight hundred and sixty-eight.

WILLIAM H. SEWARD. [L. S. . EDOUARD DE STOECKL. [l. S.

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SAX SALVADOR, 1850.

A GENERAL TREATY OF AMITY, NAVIGATION, AND COMMERCE, BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES OF NORTH AMERICA AND THE REPUBLIC OF SAN SALVADOR. CONCLUDED JANUARY 2, 1850; RATIFICATIONS EXCHANGED JUNE 2, 1852; PROCLAIMED APRIL 18, 1853.

The United States of Xorth America and the Republic of San Salvador, desiring to make lasting and firm the friendship and good understanding which happily exists between both nations, have resolved to fix, in a manner clear, distinct, and positive, the rales which shall in future be religiously observed between each other, by means of a treaty or general convention of peace and friendship, commerce, and navigation.

For this desirable object the President of the United States of America has conferred full powers upon E. G. Squier, a citizen of the said States, and their Charg6 d'Affaires to Guatemala; and the President of the Republic of San Salvador has conferred similar and equal powers upon Seilor Licenciado Don Augastin Morales, who, after having exchanged their said full powers in due form, have agreed to the following articles:

Article I.

There shall be a perfect, firm, and inviolable peace and sincere friendship between the United States of America and the Republic ra„ „„,, [ru.ai. of San Salvador, in all the extent of their possessions and territories, and between their citizens respectively, without distinction of persons or places.

ARTICLE II.

The United States of America and the Republic of Sau Salvador, desiring to live in peace and harmony with all the nations .,„„,,,-„„„.,,,,„ of the earth, by means of a policy frank and equally friendly voredTM,!?TM-^ with all, engage mutually not to grant any particular favor to other nations in respect of commerce and navigation which shall not immediately become common to the other party, who shall enjoy the same freely, if the concession was freely made, or on allowing the same compensation, if the concession was conditional.

Article III.

The two high contracting parties, being likewise desirous of placing the commerce and navigation of their respective countries Ritht ,„,„,!» »m> on the liberal basis of perfect equality and reciprocity, ma- h°'d tually agree that the citizens of each may frequent all the coasts and countries of the other, and reside therein, and shall have the power to purchase and hold lands, and all kinds of real estate, and to engage in all kinds of trade, manufactures, and mining, upon the same terms with the native citizen, and shall enjoy all the privileges and concessions in these matters which are or may be made to the citizens of any country, and shall enjoy all the rights, privileges, and exemptions in navigation, commerce, and manufactures, which native citizens do or shall enjoy, submitting themselves to the laws, decrees, or usages there established, couuu trade re- to which native citizens are subjected. But it is understood tliis article does not include the coasting trade of either country, the regulation of which is reserved by the parties respectively, according to their own separate laws.

Article IV.

They likewise agree that whatever kind of produce, manufacture, or . . ^ merchandise of any foreign country cau be, from time to to iwi.ior^i,t'y oinv" time, lawfully imported into the United States in their own vessels, may be also imported in vessels of the Republic of San Salvador; and that no higher or other duties upon the tonnage of the vessel and her cargo shall be levied and collected, whether the importation be made in vessels of the one country or of the other; and in like manner that, whatever kind of produce, manufactures, or merchandise of any foreign country can be, from time to time, lawfully imported into the Republic of San Salvador in.its own vessels, may be also imported in vessels of the United States; and that no higher or other duties upon the tonnage of the vessel and her cargo shall be levied or collected, whether the importation be made iu vessels of the one country or the other. And they further agree that whatever may be lawfully exported or re-exported from one country in its own vessels to any foreign country may iu like manner be exported or re-exported iu the vessels of the other country; and the same bounties, duties, and drawbacks shall be allowed and collected, whether such exportation or re-exportation be made in vessels of the United States or of the Republic of San Salvador.

Article V.

Xo higher or other duties shall be imposed on the importation into the No di«rimm«t„„ United States of any articles the produce or manufactures jutTM <m pmduTM. 0f Republic of San Salvador, and no higher or other duties shall be imposed on the importation into the Republic of San Salvador of any articles the produce or manufactures of the United States, than are or shall bo payable on the like articles being the produce or manufactures of any foreign country; nor shall any higher or other duties or charges be imposed in either of the two countries on the exportation of any articles to the United States or to the Republic of San Salvador, respectively, than such as are payable on the exportation of the like articles to any other foreign country; nor shall any prohibition be imposed on the exportation or importation of any articles the produce or manufactures of the United States or of the Republic of San Salvador, to or from the territories of the United States, or to or from the territories of the Republic of San Salvador, which shall not equally extend to all other nations.

Article VI.

Iu order to prevent the possibility of any misunderstanding, it is hereby Article, iv and v declared that the stipulations contained iu the three pre£nl&w"~?r*Z ceding articles are to their full extent applicable to the vessels of the United States and their cargoes arriving in the ports of San Salvador, ami reciprocally to the vessels of the said Republic of Sau Salvador and their cargoes arriving in the ports of the United States, whether they proceed from the ports of the country to which they respectively belong or from the ports of any other foreign country; and, in either case, no discriminating duty shall be imposed . or collected in the ports of either country on said vessels or '"""""tro c,n!° their cargoes, whether the same shall be of native or foreign produce or manufacture.

Article VII.

It is likewise agreed that it shall be wholly free for all merchants, commanders of ships, and other citizens of both countries, to manage, by themselves or agents, their own business in all the ports and places subject to the jurisdiction of each other, as well with respect to the consignments and sale of their goods and merchan disc, by wholesale or retail, as with respect to the loading, unloading, and sending off their ships; they being in all these cases to be treated as citizens of the country in which they reside, or at least to be placed on an equality with the subjects or citizens of the most favored nation.

Article VIII..

The citizens of neither of the contracting parties shall be liable to any embargo, nor be detained with their vessels, cargoes, merchandise, or effects, for any military expedition, nor for any """"**"■ public or private purpose whatever, without allowing to those interested an equitable and sufficient indemnification.

Article IX.

Whenever the citizens of either of the contracting parties shall be forced to seek refuge or asylum iii the rivers, bays, ports, or lr,MmeM of dominions of the other with their vessels, whether merchant or war, public or private, through stress of weather, pursuit of pirates or enemies, or want of provisions or water, they shall be received and treated with humanity, giving to them all favor and protection for repairing their ships, procuring provisions, and placing themselves in a situation to continue their voyage, without obstacle or hindrance of any kind.

Article X.

All the ships, merchandise, and effects belonging to the citizens of one of the contracting parties which may be captured by Prol)t7 pirates, whether within the limits of its jurisdiction or on tartarTM. pir««.. the high seas, and may be carried or found in the rivers, roads, bays, ports, or dominions of the other, shall be delivered up to the owners, they proving in due and proper form their rights before the competent tribunals, it being well understood that the claim shall be made within the term of one year by the parties themselves, their attorneys, or agents of their respective Governments.

Article XL

When any vessels belonging to the citizens of either of the contracting parties shall be wrecked or foundered, or shall suffer any Wrock. damage on the coasts or within the dominions of the other,

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