Page images
PDF
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][graphic]

•WITH NOTES SHOWING WHAT TREATIES OR PARTS
OF TREATIES HAVE BEEN ABROGATED,
AND DECISIONS THEREUPON.

WASHINGTON:

G OVEKNMENT PRINTING OFFICE.

1871.

H.

[graphic]

In The Senate Of The United States,

February 20, 1871.

Resolved by the Senate, (the House of Representative* concurring,) That there be printed the usual number of copies of "Treaties and Conventions" as reported to the Senate from the State Department, and in addition thereto one thousand copies for the use of the State Department, one thousand copies for the use of the Senate, and two thousand copies for the use of the House of Representatives. Attest t

GEO. C. GORHAM, Secretary,

By w. J: Mcdonald, chief cierk.

In The House Ov Representatives,

March 1, 1871.

Resolved, That the House concur in the foregoing resolution in relation to the printing of Treaties and Conventions. Attest:

Edwaru Mcpherson, cierk.

IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES.

LETTER.

*

OF

THE SECRETARY OF STATE,

COMMUNICATING,

In compliance with the resolution of the Senate of December 22,1S70, copies of all treaties and conventions (except postal contentions) entered into by the United States, the ratification whereof has been exchanged.

February a, 1871.—Referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations and ordered to

be printed.

Department Of State,

Washington, February 1, 1871. Sie : In compliance with a resolution of the Senate of the 22d December, requesting the Secretary of State "to prepare and transmit to the Senate copies of all the treaties and conventions (except postal conventions) entered into by the United States, the ratification whereof has been exchanged, with notes indicating such treaties or conventions or such parts of treaties or conventions as have been changed or abrogated," I have the honor to transmit the accompanying copies of treaties and conventions as called for by said resolution.

I have the honor to be, sir, your-obedient servant,

HAMILTON FISH.

Hon. Schuyler Colfax, .

President of the Senate.

TREATY-MAKING POWER.

By the Articles of Confederation of July 8, 1778, the following provisions were made relative to treaties by the United States:

Article VI.

Section 1. "No State, without the consent of the United States in Congress assembled, shall send any embassy- to, or receive any embassy^ from, or enter into any confirmed agreement, alliance or treaty with any King, Prince, or State; nor shall any person holding any office of profit or trust under the United States, or any of them, accept of anypresent, emolument, office or title of any kind whatsoever, from any King, Prince or foreign State; nor shall the United States in Congress assembled, or anyr of them, grant any title of nobility." Vol. I, 5.

Sec. 2. "No t wo or more States shall enter into any treaty, confederation or alliance whatever between them, without the consent of the United States in Congress assembled, specifying accurately7 the purposes for which the same is to be entered into, and how long it shall continue." Vol. I, 5.

Article IX.

Section 1. "The United States in Congress assembled shall have the sole and exclusive light and power of determining on peace and war, txcept in cases mentioned in the sixth article; of sending and receiving ambassadors, entering into treaties and alliances, provided that no treaty of commerce shall be made whereby the legislative power of the . respective States shall be restrained from imposing such imposts and Junes on foreigners as their own people are subjected to, or from prohibiting the exportation or importation of anjT species of goods or commodities whatsoever; of establishing rules for deciding in all cases what captures on land or water shall be legal, and in what manner prizes taken by land or naval forces in the service of the United States shall be decided or appropriated; of granting letters of marque and reprisal in times of peace; appointing courts for the trial of piracies and felonies committed on the high seas; and establishing courts for receiving and determining finally appeals in all cases of captures; provided that no member of Congress shall be appointed a judge of any of the said courts." Vol. I, G.

Sec. 6. "The United States in Congress assembled shall neverengage in a war nor grant letters of marque and reprisal in .time of peace, nor rater into any treaties or alliances, nor coin moneyT, nor regulate the value thereof, nor ascertain the sums and expenses necessary for the defense and welfare of the United States, or any of them, nor emit bills nor borrow money on the credit of the United States, nor appropriate money, nor agree upon the number of vessels of war to be built or pur

« PreviousContinue »