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HANSEATIC REPUBLICS, 1852.

CONVENTION FOR THE MUTUAL EXTENSION OF THE JURISDICTION OF CONSULS. BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AND THE FREE AND HANSEATIC REPUBLICS OF HAMBURG, BREMEN, AND LUBECK. CONCLUDED AT WASHINGTON APRIL 30, 1852; RATIFICATIONS EXCHANGED FEBRUARY 25, 1653; PROCLAIMED JUNE 6, 1853.

The United States of America and the Free and Hanseatic Republicks of Hamburg, Bremen, and Lubeck, having agreed to extend, in certain cases, the jurisdiction of their respective Consuls, and to increase the powers granted to said Consuls by existing treaty stipulations, have named for this purpose, as their respective Plenipotentiaries, to wit:

The President of the United States of America, Daniel Webster, Secretary of State of the United States, and the Senate of the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg, the Senate of the Free and Hanseatic City of Bremen, and the Senate of the Free and Hanseatic City of Lubeck, Albert Schumacher, Consul-General of Hamburg and Bremeu in the United States;

Who, having exchanged their fidl powers, found in due and proper form, have agreed to and signed the following articles:

Article I.

The Consuls, Vice-Consuls, commercial and vice-commercial agents of each of the high contracting parties shall have the right as such, to sit as judges and arbitrators in such differences as may arise bet ween the masters and crews of the vessels belonging to the nation whose interests are committed to their charge, without the interference of the local authorities, unless the conduct of the crews or of the master should disturb theorder or tranquillity of the country; or the said Consuls, Vice-Consuls, commercial agents, or vice commercial agents, should require their assistance in executing or supporting their own decisions. But this species of judgment or arbitration shall not deprive the contending parties of the right they have to resort, on their return, to the judicial authority of their own country.

Article II.

The present convention shall be in force for the term of twelve years I.TM*.!*TMof th„ from the day of its ratifications; and further until the end Co,,v,,„iUn. 0f twelve months, after the Government of the United States on the one part, or the Free and Hanseatic Republicks of Hamburg, Bremen, or Lubeck, or either of them, on the other part, shall have given notice of their intention to terminate the same; each of the contracting parties reserving to itself the right of giving such notice to the other at the end of the said term of twelve years. And it is hereby agreed that, at the expiration of twelve months after such notice shall have been received by either of the parties from the other, this convention, and all the provisions thereof, shall altogether cease and determine, as far as regards the States giving and receiving such notice; it being always understood and agreed that, if one or more of the Free and Hanseatic Republicks aforesaid shall, at the expiration of twelve years from the date of the ratification of the convention, give or receive ;

notice of the termination of the same, it shall, nevertheless, remain in full force and operation, as far as regards the remaining Free and Hanseatic Republicks or ltepublick, which may not have given or received such notice.

Article III.

This convention is concluded subject to the ratification of the President of the United States of America, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate thereof, and by the Senates' of the Free and Hanseatic Republicks of Hamburg, Bremen, and Lubeck; and the ratifications shall be exchanged at Washington within twelve, months from the date hereof, or sooner if possible.

In witness whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the above articles, as well in Germau as iu English, and have thereto aftixed their seals.

Done iu quadruplicate, at the city of Washington, on the thirtieth day of April, A. D. one thousand eight hundred and fiftytwo, in the seventy-sixth year of the Independence of the United States of America.

DAITL WEBSTER. • [l. 8.1
A. SCHUMACHER, [h. s.j

HAWAIIAN ISLANDS.

HAWAIIAN ISLANDS, 1849.

TREATY WITH THE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS. CONCLUDED DECEMBER 20, 184D; RATIFICATIONS EXCHANGED AT HONOLULU, AUGUST 24, 1850; PROCLAIMED NOVEMBER 9, 1850.

The United States of America and His Majesty the King of the Hawaiian Islands, equally animated with the desire of maintaining the relations of good understanding which have hitherto so happily subsisted between their respective States, and consolidating the commercial intercourse between them, have agreed to enter into negotiations for the conclusion of a treaty of friendship, commerce, and navigation, for .which purpose they have appointed Plenipotentiaries, that is to say:

The President of the United States of America, John M. Clayton, Secretary of State of the United States; and His Majesty the King of the Hawaiian Islands, James Jackson Jarves, accredited as his special Commissioner to the Government of the United States;

Who, after having exchanged their full powers, found in good and due form, have concluded and signed the following articles:

Article I.

There shall be perpetual peace and amity between the United States and the King of the Hawaiian Islands, his heirs and his

Pmo1 and amity.

successors.

Article II.

There shall be, reciprocal liberty of commerce and navigation between Reciproc.ifre.dom the United States of America and the Hawaiian Islands, ortnui.. Jj0 duty of customs, or other impost, shall be charged upon

any goods, the produce or manufacture of one country, upon importation from such country into the other, other or higher than the duty or impost charged upon goods of the same kind, the produce or manufacture of, or imported from, any other country; and the United States of America and His Majesty the King of the Hawaiian Islands do hereby engage that the subjects or citizens of any other State shall not enjoy any favor, privilege, or immunity, whatever, in matters of commerce and navigation, which shall not also, at the same time, be extended to the subjects or citizens of the other contracting party, gratuitously, if the concession in favor of that other State shall have been gratuitous, and in return for a compensation, as nearly as possible of proportionate value and effect, to be adjusted by mutual agreement, if the concession shall have been conditional.

Article III.

All articles, the produce or manufacture of either conntry, which can legally be imported into either couutry from the other, iu ships of that other country, and thence coming, shall, when so imported, be subject to the same duties, and enjoy the same privileges, whether imported in ships of the one country or in ships of the other; and in like manner, all poods which can legally be exported or re-exported from either country to the other, in ships of that other country, shall, when so exported or re-exported, be subject to the same duties, and be entitled to the same privileges, drawbacks, bounties, and allowances, whether exported in ships of the one country or in ships of the other; and all goods and articles, of whatever description, not being of the produce or manufacture of the United States, which can be legally imported into the Sandwich Islands, shall, when so imported in vessels of the United States, pay no other or higher duties, imposts, or charges, than shall be payable upon the like goods and articles when imported in the vessels of the most favored foreign nation, other than the nation of which the said goods and articles are the produce or manufacture.

Article IV.

No duties of tonnage, harbor, light houses, pilotage, quarantine, or other similar duties, of whatever nature or under whatever denomination, shall be imposed in either country upon the °°TM,*°" vessels of the other in respect of voyages between the United States of America and the Hawaiian Islands, if laden, or in respect of any voyage if in ballast, which shall not be equally imposed in the like cases on national vessels.

Article V.

It is hereby declared that the stipulations of the present treaty are not to be understood as applying to the navigation and carrying c . trade between one port and another situated in the States »«•»•■»«■ of either contracting party, such navigation and trade being reserved exclusively to national vessels.

Article VI.

Steam-vessels of the United States which may be employed by the Government of the said States in the carrying of their pub- s,«,m.v,.,wi, c.r. lie mails across the Pacific Oceau, or from one port in that ocean to another, shall have free access to the ports of the Sandwich Islands, with the privilege of stopping therein to refit, to refresh, to laud passengers and their baggage, and for the transaction of any business pertaining to the public mail service of the United States, and shall bo subject* in such ports to no duties of tonnage, harbor, light-houses, quarantine, or other similar duties, of whatever nature or under whatever denomination.

Article VII. ,

The whale-ships of the United States shall have access to the ports of Ililo, Kealakckua, and Hanalei, in the Sandwich Islands, for the purposes of refitment and refreshment, as well as to the ports of Honolulu and Lahaina, which only are ports of entry for all merchant vessels; and in all the above-named ports they shall be permitted to trade or barter their supplies or goods, excepting spirituous liquors, to the amount of two hundred dollars ad valorem for each vessel, without paying any charge for tonnage or harbor dues of any description, or any duties or imposts whatever upon the goods or articles so traded or bartered. They shall also be permitted, with the like exemption from all charges for tonnage and harbor dues, further to trade or barter,*with the same exception as to spirituous liquors, to the additional amount of one thousand dollars ad valorem for each vessel, paying upon the additional goods and articles so traded and bartered no other or higher duties than are payable on like goods and articles when imported in the vessels and by the citizens or subjects of the most favored foreign nation. They shall also be permitted to pass from port to port of the Sandwich Islands for the purpose of procuring refreshments, but they shall not discharge their seamen or land their passengers in the said islands, except at Lahaina and Honolulu; and in all the ports named in this article the whale-ships of the United States shall enjoy, in all respects whatsoever, all the rights, privileges, and immunities which are enjoyed by, or shall be granted to, the whale-ships of the most favored foreign nation. The like privilege of frequenting the three ports of the Sandwich Islands above named in this article not being ports of entry for merchant vessels, is also guaranteed to all the public armed vessels of the United States. But nothing in this article shall be construed as authorizing any vessel of the United States having on board any disease usually regarded as requiring quarantine to enter, during the continuance of such disease on board, any port of the Sandwich Islands other than Lahaina or Honolulu.

Article VIII.

The contracting parties engage, in regard to the personal privileges that the citizens of the United States of America shall enjoy "H"»"s"i,s" in the dominions of His Majesty the King of the Hawaiian •ndjvuw verTM. Islands and the subjects of his said Majesty in the United States of America, that they shall have free and undoubted right to travel and to reside in the States of the two high contracting parties, subject to the same precautious of police which are practiced towards the subjects or citizens of the most favored nations. They shall be entitled to occupy dwellings and warehouses, and to dispose of their personal property of every kind and description, by sale, gift, exchange, will, or in any other way whatever, without the smallest hiuderance or obstacle; and their heirs or representatives, being subjects or citizens of the other contracting party, shall succeed to their personal goods, whether by testament or ab intestate, and may take possession thereof, either by themselves or by others acting for thein, and dispose of the same at will, paying to the profit of the respective Governments such dues only as the inhabitants of the country whereiu the said goods are shall be subject to pay in like cases. And in case of the absence of the heir and representative, such care shall be taken of the said goods as would be taken of the goods of a native of the same country in like case until the lawful owner may take measures for receiving them. And if a question should arise among several claimants as to which of them said goods belong, the same shall be decided finally by the laws and judges of the land wherein the said goods are. Where, on the decease of any person holding real estate within the territories of one party, such real estate would, by the laws of the land, descend on a citizen or subject of the other were he not disqualified by alienage, such citizen or subject shall be allowed a reasonable time to sell the same, and to withdraw the proceeds without molestation and exempt from all duties of detraction on the part of the Government of the respective States. The citizens or subjects of the contracting parties shall not be obliged to pay, under

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