Reports of Cases in the Supreme Court of Appeals of Virginia

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D. Bottom, Superintendent of Public Print., 1878 - Law reports, digests, etc
Some vols. also contain reports of cases in the General Court of Virginia.
 

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Page 211 - The question, whether a law be void for its repugnancy to the constitution, is, at all times, a question of much delicacy, which ought seldom, if ever, to be decided in the affirmative, in a doubtful case.
Page 907 - Probable cause" has been defined as a reasonable ground of suspicion supported by circumstances sufficiently strong in themselves to warrant a cautious man in the belief that the person accused is guilty of the offense with which he is charged.
Page 391 - And it is further provided in the policy that, "if the interest of the assured in the property be any other than the entire, unconditional, and sole ownership of the property, for the use and benefit of the assured...
Page 40 - A sentence of a court pronounced against a party without hearing him, or giving him an opportunity to be heard, is not a judicial determination of his rights, and is not entitled to respect in any other tribunal.
Page 211 - But it is not on slight implication and vague conjecture that the legislature is to be pronounced to have transcended its powers, and its acts to be considered as void. The opposition between the constitution and the law should be such that the judge feels a clear and strong conviction of their incompatibility with each other.
Page 986 - The obligation of a contract is "the law which binds the parties to perform their agreement." Sturges v. Crowninshield, 4 Wheat. 122, 197; Story, op. cit., 1378. This Court has said that "the laws which subsist at the time and place of the making of a contract, and where it is to be performed, enter into and form a part of it, as if they were expressly referred to or incorporated in its terms.
Page 407 - The fundamental rule in construing statutes is to ascertain and give effect to the intention of the legislature.
Page 107 - NY, 405 it was held that no rule in the interpretation of a policy is more fully established, or more imperative and controlling, than that which declares that in all cases it must be liberally construed in favor of the insured, so as not to defeat, without a plain necessity, his claim to the indemnity, which in making the insurance it was his object to secure.
Page 519 - ... and shall also produce a certificate, under the hand and seal of a magistrate or notary public, (nearest the place of the fire, not concerned in the loss as a creditor or otherwise, nor related to the assured,) stating that he has examined the circumstances attending the loss, knows the character and circumstances of the assured, and verily believes that the assured has, without fraud, sustained loss on the property insured to the amount which such magistrate or notary public shall certify.
Page 916 - ... piece or parcel of land, lying and being in the county of , and state of Minnesota, to wit: [describe land or premises granted].

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